20-F
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 20-F

 

 

(Mark One)

REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

OR

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

OR

 

SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Date of event requiring shell company report                     

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number

001-33311

 

 

Navios Maritime Holdings Inc.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Not Applicable

(Translation of Registrant’s Name into English)

Republic of Marshall Islands

(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

7 Avenue de Grande Bretagne, Office 11B2

Monte Carlo, MC 98000 Monaco

(Address of principal executive offices)

Stuart Gelfond

Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP

One New York Plaza

New York, New York 10004

Tel: (212) 859-8000

Fax: (212) 859-4000

(Name, Telephone, E-mail and/or Facsimile number and Address of Company Contact Person)

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, par value $.0001 per share   The New York Stock Exchange
8.75% Series G Cumulative Redeemable Perpetual Preferred Stock, par value $0.0001 per share (“Series G”)   The New York Stock Exchange*
American Depositary Shares, each representing 1/100th of a Share of Series G   The New York Stock Exchange

8.625% Series H Cumulative Redeemable Perpetual

Preferred Stock, par value $0.0001 per share (“Series H”)

  The New York Stock Exchange *
American Depositary Shares, each representing 1/100th of a Share of Series H   The New York Stock Exchange

 

* Not for trading, but in connection with the registration of American Depositary Shares, pursuant to the requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act. None

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act. None

 

 

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report:

120,386,472 shares of common stock, 14,191 shares of Series G and 28,612 shares of Series H as of December 31, 2017

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ☐    No  ☒

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.    Yes  ☐    No  ☒

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or an emerging growth company. See the definition of “accelerated filer” and “large accelerated filer,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer    ☐

  Accelerated filer    ☒    Non-accelerated filer    ☐   Emerging growth company     ☐

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ☐

 

The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

 

                U.S. GAAP ☒

  

International Financial Reporting Standards as issued

by the International Accounting Standards Board ☐

   Other ☐

If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow.    Item 17  ☐    Item 18  ☐

If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ☐    No    ☒

 

 

 

 


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

     1  

Item 1. Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers

     1  

Item 2. Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable

     1  

Item 3. Key Information

     1  

Item 4. Information on the Company

     45  

Item 4A. Unresolved Staff Comments

     69  

Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects

     69  

Item 6. Directors, Senior Management and Employees

     105  

Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions

     111  

Item 8. Financial Information

     116  

Item 9. The Offer and Listing

     117  

Item 10. Additional Information

     118  

Item 11. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

     126  

Item 12. Description of Securities Other than Equity Securities

     127  

PART II

  

Item 13. Defaults, Dividend Arrearages and Delinquencies

     127  

Item  14. Material Modifications to the Rights of Security Holders and Use of Proceeds

     127  

Item 15. Controls and Procedures

     127  

Item 16A. Audit Committee Financial Expert

     128  

Item 16B. Code of Ethics

     128  

Item 16C. Principal Accountant Fees and Services

     128  

Item 16D. Exemptions from the Listing Standards for Audit Committees

     129  

Item  16E. Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers

     129  

Item 16F. Changes in Registrant’s Certifying Accountant

     129  

Item 16G. Corporate Governance

     129  

Item 16H. Mine Safety Disclosures

     129  

PART III

  

Item 17. Financial Statements

     129  

Item 18. Financial Statements

     129  

Item 19. Exhibits

     130  

EX-8.1

  

EX-12.1

  

EX-12.2

  

EX-13.1

  

EX-15.1

  

EX-15.2

  

EX-15.3

  

 


Table of Contents

Please note in this Annual Report, “we”, “us”, “our”, the “Company” and “Navios Holdings” all refer to Navios Maritime Holdings Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries, except as otherwise indicated or where the context otherwise requires.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included in this report.

Navios Maritime Holdings Inc. desires to take advantage of the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and is including this cautionary statement in connection with this safe harbor legislation. This document and any other written or oral statements made by us or on our behalf may include forward-looking statements, which reflect our current views with respect to future events and financial performance. The words “may,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “expect,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “forecast,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “propose,” “potential,” “continue” and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements.

The forward-looking statements in this document and in other written or oral statements we make from time to time are based upon current assumptions, many of which are based, in turn, upon further assumptions, including without limitation, management’s examination of historical operating trends, data contained in our records, and other data available from third parties. Although we believe that these assumptions were reasonable when made, because these assumptions are inherently subject to significant uncertainties and contingencies which are difficult or impossible to predict and are beyond our control, we cannot assure you that we will achieve or accomplish these expectations, beliefs or projections.

In addition to these important factors and matters discussed elsewhere herein, important factors that, in our view, could cause actual results to differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, the strength of world economies, fluctuations in currencies and interest rates, general market conditions, including fluctuations in charter hire rates and vessel values, changes in demand in the dry cargo shipping industry, changes in the Company’s operating expenses, including bunker prices, drydocking and insurance costs, expectations of dividends and distributions from affiliates, the Company’s ability to maintain compliance with the continued listing standards of the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”), changes in governmental rules and regulations or actions taken by regulatory authorities, potential liability from pending or future litigation, general domestic and international political conditions, potential disruption of shipping routes due to accidents or political events, the value of our publicly traded subsidiaries, and other important factors described from time to time in the reports we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC. See also “Risk Factors” below.

We undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement or statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which such statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by law. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all of these factors. Further, we cannot assess the impact of each such factor on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to be materially different from those contained in any forward-looking statement.

PART I

Item 1. Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers

Not Applicable.

Item 2. Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable

Not Applicable.

Item 3. Key Information

A. Selected Financial Data

Navios Holdings’ selected historical financial information and operating results for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014 and 2013 are derived from the consolidated financial statements of Navios Holdings. The selected consolidated statement of comprehensive (loss)/income data for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015 and the selected consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2017 and 2016 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report. The selected consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects”, the consolidated financial statements, related notes and other financial information included elsewhere in this Annual Report. The historical data included below and elsewhere in this Annual Report is not necessarily indicative of our future performance.

 

1


Table of Contents
     Year Ended
December 31,
2017
    Year Ended
December 31,
2016
    Year Ended
December 31,
2015
    Year Ended
December 31,
2014
    Year Ended
December 31,
2013
 
     (Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars — except share and per share data)  

Statement of Comprehensive (Loss)/income Data

          

Revenue

   $ 463,049     $ 419,782     $ 480,820     $ 569,016     $ 512,279  

Administrative fee revenue from affiliates

     23,667       21,799       16,177       14,300       7,868  

Time charter, voyage and logistics business expenses

     (213,929     (175,072     (247,882     (263,304     (244,412

Direct vessel expenses

     (116,713     (127,396     (128,168     (130,064     (114,074

General and administrative expenses incurred on behalf of affiliates

     (23,667     (21,799     (16,177     (14,300     (7,868

General and administrative expenses

     (27,521     (25,295     (34,183     (45,590     (44,634

Depreciation and amortization

     (104,112     (113,825     (120,310     (104,690     (98,124

Provision for losses on accounts receivable

     (269     (1,304     (59     (792     (630

Interest income

     6,831       4,947       2,370       5,515       2,299  

Interest expense and finance cost

     (121,611     (113,639     (113,151     (113,660     (110,805

Impairment losses

     (50,565     —         —         —         —    

Loss on derivatives

     —         —         —         —         (260

Gain on sale of assets

     1,064       —         —         —         18  

(Loss)/gain on bond and debt extinguishment

     (981     29,187       —         (27,281     (37,136

Other income

     6,140       18,175       4,840       15,639       17,031  

Other expense

     (13,761     (11,665     (34,982     (24,520     (10,447
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before equity in net earnings of affiliated companies

   $ (172,378   $ (96,105   $ (190,705   $ (119,731   $ (128,895

Equity/(loss) in net earnings of affiliated companies

     4,399       (202,779     61,484       57,751       19,344  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before taxes

   $ (167,979   $ (298,884   $ (129,221   $ (61,980   $ (109,551

Income tax benefit/(expense)

     3,192       (1,265     3,154       (84     4,260  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

   $ (164,787   $ (300,149   $ (126,067   $ (62,064   $ (105,291

Less: Net (income)/loss attributable to the noncontrolling interest

     (1,123     (3,674     (8,045     5,861       (3,772
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to Navios Holdings common stockholders

   $ (165,910   $ (303,823   $ (134,112   $ (56,203   $ (109,063
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss attributable to Navios Holdings common stockholders, basic and diluted

   $ (175,298   $ (273,105   $ (150,314   $ (66,976   $ (110,990
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to Navios Holdings common stockholders

   $ (1.50   $ (2.54   $ (1.42   $ (0.65   $ (1.09
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted average number of shares, basic and diluted

     116,673,459       107,366,783       105,896,235       103,476,614       101,854,415  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

2


Table of Contents

Balance Sheet Data (at period end)

              

Current assets, including cash and restricted cash

   $ 256,076      $ 273,140      $ 302,959      $ 417,131      $ 339,986  

Total assets

     2,629,981        2,752,895        2,958,813        3,127,697        2,886,453  

Total long-term debt, net including current portion

     1,682,488        1,651,095        1,581,308        1,612,890        1,478,089  

Navios Holdings’ stockholders’ equity

   $ 516,098      $ 678,287      $ 988,960      $ 1,152,963      $ 1,065,695  

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
2017
    Year Ended
December 31,
2016
    Year Ended
December 31,
2015
    Year Ended
December 31,
2014
    Year Ended
December 31,
2013
 
     (Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars — except per share data)  

Other Financial Data

          

Net cash provided by operating activities

   $ 50,784     $ 36,920     $ 43,478     $ 56,323     $ 59,749  

Net cash used in investing activities

     (42,365     (150,565     (36,499     (244,888     (258,571

Net cash (used in)/ provided by financing activities

     (16,779     86,225       (91,123     248,290       128,785  

Book value per common share

     4.29       5.79       8.95       10.89       10.22  

Cash dividends per common share

     —         —         0.17       0.24       0.24  

Cash dividends per preferred share

     —         74.4       216.7       99.9       200.0  

Cash paid for common stock dividend declared

     —         —         19,325       25,228       24,710  

Cash paid for preferred stock dividend declared

     —         3,681       16,025       7,502       1,696  

Adjusted EBITDA(1)

   $ 68,813     $ (62,827   $ 112,756     $ 176,698     $ 107,909  

 

(1) EBITDA represents net (loss)/income attributable to Navios Holdings’ common stockholders before interest and finance costs, before depreciation and amortization and before income taxes. Adjusted EBITDA represents EBITDA before stock based compensation. We use Adjusted EBITDA as liquidity measure and reconcile Adjusted EBITDA to net cash provided by operating activities, the most comparable U.S. GAAP liquidity measure. Adjusted EBITDA is calculated as follows: net cash provided by operating activities adding back, when applicable and as the case may be, the effect of (i) net increase/(decrease) in operating assets, (ii) net (increase)/decrease in operating liabilities, (iii) net interest cost, (iv) deferred finance charges and gains/(losses) on bond and debt extinguishment, (v) (provision)/recovery for losses on accounts receivable, (vi) equity in affiliates, net of dividends received, (vii) payments for drydock and special survey costs, (viii) noncontrolling interest, (ix) gain/ (loss) on sale of assets/ subsidiaries, (x) unrealized (loss)/gain on derivatives, and (xi) loss on sale and reclassification to earnings of available-for-sale securities and impairment charges. Navios Holdings believes that Adjusted EBITDA is a basis upon which liquidity can be assessed and represents useful information to investors regarding Navios Holdings’ ability to service and/or incur indebtedness, pay capital expenditures, meet working capital requirements and pay dividends. Navios Holdings also believes that Adjusted EBITDA is used (i) by prospective and current lessors as well as potential lenders to evaluate potential transactions; (ii) to evaluate and price potential acquisition candidates; and (iii) by securities analysts, investors and other interested parties in the evaluation of companies in our industry.

Adjusted EBITDA has limitations as an analytical tool, and therefore, should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for the analysis of Navios Holdings’ results as reported under U.S. GAAP. Some of these limitations are: (i) Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect changes in, or cash requirements for, working capital needs; (ii) Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect the amounts necessary to service interest or principal payments on our debt and other financing arrangements; and (iii) although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being depreciated and amortized may have to be replaced in the future. Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect any cash requirements for such capital expenditures. Because of these limitations, among others, Adjusted EBITDA should not be considered as a principal indicator of Navios Holdings’ performance. Furthermore, our calculation of Adjusted EBITDA may not be comparable to that reported by other companies due to differences in methods of calculation.

 

3


Table of Contents

The following table reconciles net cash provided by operating activities, as reflected in the consolidated statements of cash flows, to Adjusted EBITDA:

Adjusted EBITDA Reconciliation from Cash from Operations

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
2017
    Year Ended
December 31,
2016
    Year Ended
December 31,
2015
    Year Ended
December 31,
2014
    Year Ended
December 31,
2013
 
     (Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars — except per share data)  

Net cash provided by operating activities

   $ 50,784     $ 36,920     $ 43,478     $ 56,323     $ 59,749  

Net (decrease)/ increase in operating assets

     (25,052     20,599       (43,042     18,025       (57,792

Net (increase)/decrease in operating liabilities

     (20,814     (38,928     (39,288     (23,613     27,087  

Payments for drydock and special survey costs

     10,824       11,096       24,840       10,970       12,119  

Net interest cost

     108,389       103,039       106,257       104,084       103,122  

Provision for losses on accounts receivable

     (269     (1,304     (59     (792     (630

Impairment losses

     (50,565     —         —         —         —    

Gain on sale of assets

     1,064       —         —         —         18  

Unrealized loss on FFA derivatives, warrants, interest rate swaps

     —         —         —         —         (69

Gain/ (Loss) on bond and debt extinguishment

     185       29,187       —         (4,786     (12,142

(Losses)/earnings in affiliates and joint ventures, net of dividends received

     (4,610     (219,417     30,398       22,179       (19,781

Reclassification to earnings of available-for-sale securities

     —         (345     (1,783     (11,553     —    

Noncontrolling interest

     (1,123     (3,674     (8,045     5,861       (3,772
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

   $ 68,813     $ (62,827   $ 112,756     $ 176,698     $ 107,909  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

B. Capitalization and Indebtedness

Not applicable.

C. Reasons for the Offer and Use of Proceeds

Not applicable.

D. Risk Factors

Some of the following risks relate principally to the industry in which we operate and our business in general. Other risks relate principally to the securities market and ownership of our common stock. You should carefully consider each of the following risks together with the other information incorporated into this Annual Report when evaluating the Company’s business and its prospects. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones the Company faces. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to the Company or that the Company currently considers immaterial may also impair the Company’s business operations. If any of the following risks relating to our business and operations actually occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected and in that case, the trading price of our common stock could decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment.

 

4


Table of Contents

Risks Associated with the Shipping Industry and Our Operations

The cyclical nature of the shipping industry may lead to decreases in charter rates and lower vessel values, which could adversely affect our and our affiliates’ results of operations and financial condition. In particular, charter rates in the dry cargo market are currently near historical lows and certain of our vessels may operate below operating cost.

The shipping business, including the dry cargo market, is cyclical in varying degrees, experiencing severe fluctuations in charter rates, profitability and, consequently, vessel values. For example, during the period from January 1, 2016 to December 31, 2017, the Baltic Exchange’s Panamax time charter average daily rates experienced a low of $2,260 and a high of $13,740. Additionally, during the period from January 1, 2016 to December 31, 2017, the Baltic Exchange’s Capesize time charter average (BCI-5TCA) daily rates experienced a low of $1,985 and a high of $30,475 and the Baltic Dry Index experienced a low of 290 points and a high of 1,743 points. There can be no assurance that the dry bulk charter market will not fluctuate or hit new lows. We anticipate that the future demand for our dry bulk carriers and dry bulk charter rates will be dependent upon demand for imported commodities, economic growth in the emerging markets, including the Asia Pacific region, of which China is particularly important, India, Brazil and Russia and the rest of the world, seasonal and regional changes in demand and changes to the capacity of the world fleet. Adverse economic, political, social or other developments can decrease demand and prospects for growth in the shipping industry and thereby could reduce revenue significantly. A decline in demand for commodities transported in dry bulk carriers or an increase in supply of dry bulk vessels could cause a further decline in charter rates, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. If we sell a vessel at a time when the market value of our vessels has fallen, the sale may be at less than the vessel’s carrying amount, resulting in a loss.

Demand for container shipments declined significantly from 2008 to 2009 in the aftermath of the global financial crisis but has increased each year from 2009 to 2017. In 2016, total container trade grew by 4.2%, influenced by strong trade growth worldwide. In 2017, total container trade is estimated to have gained 5.5%, led by recovering volumes going to the US as well as increases in intra-regional trade. Containership supply growth was less than demand growth during the year as there was elevated scrapping in the first part of the year, which allowed average daily rates to recover modestly. The oversupply in the market continued to prevent any significant rise in time charter rates for both short- and long-term periods. Additional orders for large and very large containerships continue to be placed during 2017 and so far in 2018, both increasing the expected future supply of larger vessels and having a spillover effect on the market segment for smaller vessels. Ordering of container ships slowed significantly in 2016 and 2017 while scrapping increased to a record volume in 2016 and was the third highest on record in 2017. The recent global economic slowdown and disruptions in the credit markets significantly reduced demand for products shipped in containers and, in turn, containership capacity, which has had an adverse effect on our and our affiliates’ results of operations and financial condition.

The continuation of such containership oversupply or any declines in container freight rates could negatively affect the liner companies to which our affiliates seek to charter their containerships.

Historically, the tanker markets have been volatile as a result of the many conditions and factors that can affect the price, supply and demand for tanker capacity. Demand for crude oil and product tankers is historically well correlated with the growth or contraction of the world economy. The past several years were marked by a major economic slowdown, which has had, and continues to have, a significant impact on world trade, including the oil trade. Global economic conditions remain fragile with significant uncertainty with respect to recovery prospects, levels of recovery and long-term economic growth effects. Energy prices sharply declined from mid-2014 to the end of March 2016 primarily as a result of increased oil production worldwide. In response to this increased production, demand for tankers to move oil and refined petroleum products increased significantly and average spot and period charter rates for product and crude tankers rose, but have since then declined as more tankers have been delivered. Keys to this demand growth have been steady increases in Chinese and Indian crude oil imports since 2001 and a steady increase in US oil production, which has led to a steady decline in US crude oil imports since 2005. Oil products shipments have increased due to refinery closures in Europe, Japan and Australia with oil products being shipped to those regions from India, the Middle East and the US. With the increase in US crude oil production, the US became a net exporter of oil products since 2011 adding to the seaborne movement of oil products, recently however, large inventories of products have reduced arbitrage possibilities and spot rates for product tankers have moderated. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (“OPEC”) is currently producing and shipping oil at very high levels, even after it announced the continued production cuts. Should OPEC significantly reduce oil production or should there be significant declines in non-OPEC oil production or should China or other emerging market countries suffer significant economic slowdowns, that may result in a protracted period of reduced oil shipments and a decreased demand for our affiliated tanker vessels and lower charter rates, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

The percentage of the total tanker fleet on order as a percent of the total fleet declined from 18% at the end of 2015 to 12% at the beginning of March 2018. An over-supply of tanker capacity may result in a reduction of charter hire rates. If a reduction in charter rates occurs, our affiliates may only be able to charter their tanker vessels at unprofitable rates or may not be able to charter these vessels at all, which could lead to a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

5


Table of Contents

The demand for dry cargo vessels, containerships and tanker capacity has generally been influenced by, among other factors:

 

    global and regional economic conditions;

 

    developments in international trade;

 

    changes in seaborne and other transportation patterns, such as port congestion and canal closures or expansions;

 

    supply and demand for energy resources, commodities, semi-finished and finished consumer and industrial products, and liquid cargoes, including petroleum and petroleum products;

 

    changes in the exploration or production of energy resources, commodities, semi-finished and finished consumer and industrial products;

 

    supply and demand for products shipped in containers;

 

    changes in global production of raw materials or products transported by containerships;

 

    the distance dry bulk cargo or containers are to be moved by sea;

 

    the globalization of manufacturing;

 

    carrier alliances, vessel sharing or container slot sharing that seek to allocate container ship capacity on routes;

 

    weather and crop yields;

 

    armed conflicts and terrorist activities, including piracy;

 

    natural or man-made disasters that affect the ability of our vessels to use certain waterways;

 

    political, environmental and other regulatory developments, including but not limited to governmental macroeconomic policy changes, import- export restrictions, central bank policies and pollution conventions or protocols;

 

    embargoes and strikes;

 

    technical advances in ship design and construction;

 

    waiting days in ports;

 

    changes in oil production and refining capacity and regional availability of petroleum refining capacity;

 

    the distance chemicals, petroleum and petroleum products are to be moved by sea;

 

    changes in seaborne and other transportation patterns, including changes in distances over which cargo is transported due to geographic changes in where oil is produced, refined and used; and

 

    competition from alternative sources of energy.

The supply of vessel capacity has generally been influenced by, among other factors:

 

    the number of vessels that are in or out of service;

 

    the scrapping rate of older vessels;

 

    port and canal traffic and congestion;

 

    the number of newbuilding deliveries;

 

    vessel casualties;

 

    the availability of shipyard capacity;

 

    the economics of slow steaming;

 

    the number of vessels that are used for storage or as floating storage offloading service vessels;

 

    the conversion of tankers to other uses, including conversion of vessels from transporting oil and oil products to carrying dry bulk cargo and the reverse conversion;

 

6


Table of Contents
    availability of financing for new vessels;

 

    the phasing out of single-hull tankers due to legislation and environmental concerns;

 

    the price of steel;

 

    national or international regulations that may effectively cause reductions in the carrying capacity of vessels or early obsolescence of tonnage; and

 

    environmental concerns and regulations.

Our growth depends on continued growth in demand for dry bulk commodities and the shipping of dry bulk cargoes.

Our growth strategy focuses on expansion in the dry bulk shipping sector. Accordingly, our growth depends on continued growth in worldwide and regional demand for dry bulk commodities and the shipping of dry bulk cargoes, which could be negatively affected by a number of factors, such as declines in prices for dry bulk commodities, or general political and economic conditions.

Reduced demand for dry bulk commodities and the shipping of dry bulk cargoes would have a material adverse effect on our future growth and could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition. In particular, Asian Pacific economies, of which China is especially important, and India have been the main driving force behind the current increase in seaborne dry bulk trade and the demand for dry bulk carriers. A negative change in economic conditions in any Asian Pacific country, but particularly in China, Korea, Japan or India, may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, as well as our future prospects, by reducing demand and resultant charter rates.

Weak economic conditions throughout the world, particularly the Asia Pacific region, renewed terrorist activity, the growing refugee crises and protectionist policies which could affect advanced economies, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The global economy remains relatively weak, especially when compared to the period prior to the 2008-2009 financial crisis. The current global recovery is proceeding at varying speeds across regions and is still subject to downside economic risks stemming from factors like fiscal fragility in advanced economies, high sovereign and private debt levels, highly accommodative macroeconomic policies, the significant fall in the price of crude oil and other commodities and persistent difficulties in access to credit and equity financing as well as political risks such as the continuing war in Syria, renewed terrorist attacks around the world and the emergence of populist and protectionist political movements in advanced economies.

Concerns regarding new terrorist threats from groups in Europe and the growing refugee crisis may advance protectionist policies and may negatively impact globalization and global economic growth, which could disrupt financial markets, and may lead to weaker consumer demand in the EU, the U.S., and other parts of the world which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

In recent years, China has been one of the world’s fastest growing economies in terms of gross domestic product, which has had a significant impact on shipping demand. However, if China’s growth in gross domestic product declines and other countries in the Asia Pacific region experience slower or negative economic growth in the future, this may negatively affect the fragile recovery of the economies of the U.S. and the EU, and thus, may negatively impact shipping demand. For example, the possibility of the introduction of impediments to trade within the EU member countries in response to increasing terrorist activities, and the possibility of market reforms to float the Chinese renminbi, either of which development could weaken the Euro against the Chinese renminbi, could adversely affect consumer demand in the EU. Moreover, the revaluation of the renminbi may negatively impact the U.S.’ demand for imported goods, many of which are shipped from China. Any moves by either the U.S. or the EU to levy additional tariffs on imported goods carried in containers as part of protectionist measures or otherwise could decrease shipping demand. Such weak economic conditions or protectionist measures could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition, as well as our cash flows.

 

7


Table of Contents

Disruptions in global financial markets from terrorist attacks, regional armed conflicts, general political unrest and the resulting governmental action could have a material adverse impact our ability to obtain financing required to acquire vessels or new businesses. Furthermore, such a disruption would adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows and could cause the market price of our shares to decline.

Terrorist attacks in certain parts of the world, such as the attacks on the U.S. on September 11, 2001 or more recently in Paris and London, and the continuing response of the U.S. and other countries to these attacks, as well as the threat of future terrorist attacks, continue to cause uncertainty and volatility in the world financial markets and may affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, global financial markets and economic conditions have been severely disrupted and volatile in recent years and remain subject to significant vulnerabilities, such as the deterioration of fiscal balances and the rapid accumulation of public debt, continued deleveraging in the banking sector and a limited supply of credit. Credit markets as well as the debt and equity capital markets were exceedingly distressed during 2008 and 2009 and have been volatile since that time. The continuing refugee crisis in the EU, the continuing war in Syria and advances of ISIS and other terrorist organizations in the Middle East, conflicts in Iraq, general political unrest in Ukraine, and political tension or conflicts in the Asia Pacific Region such as in the South China Sea and North Korea have led to increased volatility in global credit and equity markets. The resulting uncertainty and volatility in the global financial markets may accordingly affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. These uncertainties, as well as future hostilities or other political instability in regions where our vessels trade, could also affect trade volumes and patterns and adversely affect our operations, and otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition, as well as our cash flows.

Further, as a result of the ongoing political and economic turmoil in Greece resulting from the sovereign debt crisis and the related austerity measures implemented by the Greek government, the operations of our managers located in Greece may be subjected to new regulations and potential shift in government policies that may require us to incur new or additional compliance or other administrative costs and may require the payment of new taxes or other fees. We also face the risk that strikes, work stoppages, civil unrest and violence within Greece may disrupt the shoreside operations of our managers located in Greece.

Specifically, these issues, along with the re-pricing of credit risk and the difficulties currently experienced by financial institutions, have made, and will likely continue to make, it difficult to obtain financing. As a result of the disruptions in the credit markets and higher capital requirements, many lenders have increased margins on lending rates, enacted tighter lending standards, required more restrictive terms (including higher collateral ratios for advances, shorter maturities and smaller loan amounts), or have refused to refinance existing debt at all. Furthermore, certain banks that have historically been significant lenders to the shipping industry have reduced or ceased lending activities in the shipping industry. Additional tightening of capital requirements and the resulting policies adopted by lenders, could further reduce lending activities. We may experience difficulties obtaining financing commitments or be unable to fully draw on the capacity under our committed term loans in the future, if our lenders are unwilling to extend financing to us or unable to meet their funding obligations due to their own liquidity, capital or solvency issues. We cannot be certain that financing will be available on acceptable terms or at all. If financing is not available when needed, or is available only on unfavorable terms, we may be unable to meet our future obligations as they come due. Our failure to obtain such funds could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition, as well as our cash flows. In the absence of available financing, we also may be unable to take advantage of business opportunities or respond to competitive pressures.

The New York Stock Exchange may delist our common stock from trading on its exchange, which could limit your ability to trade our common stock and subject us to additional trading restrictions.

A company is not in compliance with the continued listing standards set forth in Section 802.01C of the NYSE Listed Company Manual if the average closing price of that company’s common stock is less than $1.00 over a consecutive 30 trading-day period.

Since March 26, 2018, the closing price of our common stock was less than $1.00.

Under the NYSE Listed Company Manual, a listed company is generally afforded a six-month period following receipt of the NYSE deficiency notice to regain compliance, after which the NYSE will commence suspension of trading and delisting procedures. Regaining compliance requires, on the last trading day of any calendar month, a company’s common stock price per share and 30 trading-day average closing share price to be at least $1.00. During this six month period, a company’s common stock will continue to be traded on the NYSE, subject to compliance with other continued listing requirements and further subject to the discretion of the NYSE to commence delisting procedures against a company’s common stock for other reasons, such as selling for an abnormally low price.

While we are currently in compliance with the NYSE listing standards, we cannot assure you that our common stock will continue to be listed on NYSE in the future.

 

8


Table of Contents

If our common stock ultimately were to be delisted for any reason, we could face significant material adverse consequences, including:

 

    a limited availability of market quotations for our common stock;

 

    a limited amount of news and analyst coverage for us;

 

    a decreased ability for us to issue additional securities or obtain additional financing in the future;

 

    limited liquidity for our shareholders due to thin trading; and

 

    loss of our tax exemption under Section 883 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), loss of preferential capital gain tax rates for certain dividends received by certain non-corporate U.S. holders, and loss of “mark-to-market” election by U.S. holders in the event we are treated as a passive foreign investment company (“PFIC”).

A decrease in the level of China’s imports of raw materials or a decrease in trade globally could have a material adverse impact on our charterers’ business and, in turn, could cause a material adverse impact on our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

China imports significant quantities of raw materials. For example, in 2017, China imported 1.058 billion tons of iron out of a total of 1.474 billion tons shipped globally accounting for about 72% of the global seaborne iron ore trade. While it only accounted for 18% of seaborne coal movements of coal in 2017 according to current estimates (217 million tons imported compared to 1.197 billion tons of seaborne coal traded globally), that is a decline from over 22% in 2013 (264 million tons imported compared to 1.182 billion tons of seaborne coal traded globally). Our dry bulk vessels are deployed by our charterers on routes involving dry bulk trade in and out of emerging markets, and our charterers’ dry bulk shipping and business revenue may be derived from the shipment of goods within and to the Asia Pacific region from various overseas export markets. Any reduction in or hindrance to China-based importers could have a material adverse effect on the growth rate of China’s imports and on our charterers’ business. For instance, the government of China has implemented economic policies aimed at reducing pollution, increasing consumption of domestically produced Chinese coal or promoting the export of such coal. This may have the effect of reducing the demand for imported raw materials and may, in turn, result in a decrease in demand for dry bulk shipping. Additionally, though in China there is an increasing level of autonomy and a gradual shift in emphasis to a “market economy” and enterprise reform, many of the reforms, particularly some limited price reforms that result in the prices for certain commodities being principally determined by market forces, are unprecedented or experimental and may be subject to revision, change or abolition. The level of imports to and exports from China could be adversely affected by changes to these economic reforms by the Chinese government, as well as by changes in political, economic and social conditions or other relevant policies of the Chinese government.

For example, China imposes a new tax for non-resident international transportation enterprises engaged in the provision of services of passengers or cargo, among other items, in and out of China using their own, chartered or leased vessels, including any stevedore, warehousing and other services connected with the transportation. The regulation broadens the range of international transportation companies who may find themselves liable for Chinese enterprise income tax on profits generated from international transportation services passing through Chinese ports. This tax or similar regulations, such as the recently promoted environmental taxes on coal, by China may result in an increase in the cost of raw materials imported to China and the risks associated with importing raw materials to China, as well as a decrease in the quantity of raw materials to be shipped from our charterers to China. This could have an adverse impact on our charterers’ business, operating results and financial condition and could thereby affect their ability to make timely charter hire payments to us and to renew and increase the number of their time charters with us.

Our operations expose us to the risk that increased trade protectionism from China or other nations will adversely affect our business. If the global recovery is undermined by downside risks and the recent economic downturn returns, governments may turn to trade barriers to protect their domestic industries against foreign imports, thereby depressing the demand for shipping. Specifically, increasing trade protectionism in the markets that our charterers serve may cause (i) a decrease in cargoes available to our charterers in favor of local charterers and local owned ships and (ii) an increase in the risks associated with importing goods to China. Any increased trade barriers or restrictions on trade, especially trade with China, would have an adverse impact on our charterers’ business, operating results and financial condition and could thereby affect their ability to make timely charter hire payments to us and to renew and increase the number of their time charters with us. This could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and our ability to pay cash distributions to our stockholders.

 

9


Table of Contents

When our contracts expire, we may not be able to successfully replace them, or we may not choose to enter into long-term contracts at levels that are at or below operating costs.

The process for concluding contracts and longer term time charters generally involves a lengthy and intensive screening and vetting process and the submission of competitive bids. In addition to the quality and suitability of the vessel, medium and longer term shipping contracts tend to be awarded based upon a variety of other factors relating to the vessel operator, including:

 

    environmental, health and safety record;

 

    compliance with regulatory industry standards;

 

    reputation for customer service, technical and operating expertise;

 

    shipping experience and quality of ship operations, including cost-effectiveness;

 

    quality, experience and technical capability of crews;

 

    the ability to finance vessels at competitive rates and overall financial stability;

 

    relationships with shipyards and the ability to obtain suitable berths;

 

    construction management experience, including the ability to procure on-time delivery of new vessels according to customer specifications;

 

    willingness to accept operational risks pursuant to the charter, such as allowing termination of the charter for force majeure events; and

 

    competitiveness of the bid in terms of overall price.

As a result of these factors, when our contracts including our long-term charters expire, we cannot assure you that we will be able to replace them promptly or at all or at rates sufficient to allow us to operate our business profitably, to meet our obligations, including payment of debt service to our lenders, or to pay dividends. Our ability to renew the charter contracts on our vessels on the expiration or termination of our current charters, or, on vessels that we may acquire in the future, the charter rates payable under any replacement charter contracts, will depend upon, among other things, economic conditions in the sectors in which our vessels operate at that time, changes in the supply and demand for vessel capacity and changes in the supply and demand for the transportation of commodities. During periods of market distress when long-term charters may be renewed at rates at or below operating costs, we may not choose to charter our vessels for longer terms particularly if doing so would create an ongoing negative cash flow during the period of the charter. We may instead choose or be forced to idle our vessels or lay them up or scrap them depending on market conditions and outlook at the time those vessels become available for charter.

However, if we are successful in employing our vessels under longer-term time charters, our vessels will not be available for trading in the spot market during an upturn in the market cycle, when spot trading may be more profitable. If we cannot successfully employ our vessels in profitable charter contracts, our results of operations and operating cash flow could be materially adversely affected.

We may employ vessels on the spot market and thus expose ourselves to risk of losses based on short-term decreases in shipping rates.

We periodically employ some of our vessels on a spot basis. The spot charter market is highly competitive and freight rates within this market are highly volatile, while longer-term charter contracts provide income at pre-determined rates over more extended periods of time. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in keeping our vessels fully employed in these short-term markets, or that future spot rates will be sufficient to enable such vessels to be operated profitably. A significant decrease in spot market rates or our inability to fully employ our vessels by taking advantage of the spot market would result in a reduction of the incremental revenue received from spot chartering and adversely affect our results of operations, including our profitability and cash flows, with the result that our ability to pay debt service and dividends could be impaired.

Additionally, if spot market rates or short-term time charter rates become significantly lower than the time charter equivalent rates that some of our charterers are obligated to pay us under our existing charters, the charterers may have incentive to default under that charter or attempt to renegotiate the charter. If our charterers fail to pay their obligations, we would have to attempt to re-charter our vessels at lower charter rates, which would affect our ability to comply with our loan covenants and operate our vessels profitably. If we are not able to comply with our loan covenants and our lenders choose to accelerate our indebtedness and foreclose their liens, we could be required to sell vessels in our fleet and our ability to continue to conduct our business would be impaired.

 

10


Table of Contents

We depend upon significant customers for part of our revenues. The loss of one or more of these customers or a decline in the financial capability of our customers could materially adversely affect our financial performance.

We derive a significant part of our revenue from a small number of charterers. During the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015, we derived approximately 31.1%, 41.1%, and 33.8%, respectively, of our gross revenues from four customers. For the year ended December 31, 2017, no customers accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s revenue. For the year ended December 31, 2016, two customers accounted for 14.7% and 13.1%, respectively, of the Company’s revenue. For the year ended December 31, 2015, one customer accounted for 15.1% of the Company’s revenue.

We could lose a customer or the benefits of a time charter if, among other things:

 

    the customer fails to make charter payments because of its financial inability, disagreements with us or otherwise, which risk is increasing due to the current economic environment;

 

    the customer terminates the charter because we fail to deliver the vessel within a fixed period of time, the vessel is lost or damaged beyond repair, there are serious deficiencies in the vessel or prolonged periods of off-hire, default under the charter; or

 

    the customer terminates the charter because the vessel has been subject to seizure for more than a specified number of days.

Furthermore, a number of our charters are at above-market rates, such that any loss of such charter may require us to recharter the vessel at lower rates. Additionally, our charterers from time to time have sought to renegotiate their charter rates with us. We no longer maintain insurance against the risk of default by our customers.

If one or more of our customers is unable to perform under one or more charters with us and we are not able to find a replacement charter, or if a charterer exercises certain rights to terminate the charter, or if a charterer is unable to make its charter payments in whole or in part, we could suffer a loss of revenues that could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are subject to certain credit risks with respect to our counterparties on contracts, and the failure of such counterparties to meet their obligations could cause us to suffer losses on such contracts and thereby decrease revenues.

We charter-out our vessels to other parties who pay us a daily rate of hire. We also enter into contracts of affreightment (“COAs”) pursuant to which we agree to carry cargoes, typically for industrial customers, who export or import dry bulk cargoes. Additionally, we may enter into Forward Freight Agreements (“FFAs”), parts of which are traded over-the-counter. We also enter into spot market voyage contracts, where we are paid a rate per ton to carry a specified cargo on a specified route. The FFAs and these contracts and arrangements subject us to counterparty credit risks at various levels. If the counterparties fail to meet their obligations, we could suffer losses on such contracts, which could materially adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, if a charterer defaults on a time charter, we may only be able to enter into new contracts at lower rates. It is also possible that we would be unable to secure a charter at all. If we re-charter the vessel at lower rates or not at all, our financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

Trading and complementary hedging activities in freight, tonnage and FFAs subject us to trading risks, and we may suffer trading losses, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Due to dry bulk shipping market volatility, success in this shipping industry requires constant adjustment of the balance between chartering-out vessels for long periods of time and trading them on a spot basis. A long-term contract to charter a vessel might lock us into a profitable or unprofitable situation depending on the direction of freight rates over the term of the contract. We may seek to manage and mitigate that risk through trading and complementary hedging activities in freight, tonnage and FFAs. We may trade FFAs with an objective of both economically hedging the risk on the fleet, specific vessels or freight commitments and taking advantage of short-term fluctuations in market prices. There can be no assurance that we will be able at all times to successfully protect ourselves from volatility in the shipping market. We may not successfully mitigate our risks, leaving us exposed to unprofitable contracts, and may suffer trading losses resulting from these hedging activities.

We are subject to certain operating risks, including vessel breakdowns or accidents, that could result in a loss of revenue from the chartered-in vessels and which in turn could have an adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition.

Our exposure to operating risks of vessel breakdown and accidents mainly arises in the context of our owned vessels. The rest of our core fleet is chartered-in under time charters and, as a result, most operating risks relating to these time chartered vessels remain with their owners. If we pay hire on a chartered-in vessel at a lower rate than the rate of hire it receives from a sub-charterer to whom we have chartered out the vessel, a breakdown or loss of the vessel due to an operating risk suffered by the owner will, in all

 

11


Table of Contents

likelihood, result in our loss of the positive spread between the two rates of hire. Although we maintain insurance policies (subject to deductibles and exclusions) to cover us against the loss of such spread through the sinking or other loss of a chartered-in vessel, we cannot assure you that we will be covered under all circumstances or that such policies will be available in the future on commercially reasonable terms. Breakdowns or accidents involving our vessels and losses relating to chartered vessels, which are not covered by insurance, would result in a loss of revenue from the affected vessels adversely affecting our financial condition and results of operations.

Risks inherent in the operation of ocean-going vessels could affect our business and reputation, which could adversely affect our expenses, net income, cash flow and the price of our common stock.

The operation of ocean-going vessels entails certain inherent risks that may materially adversely affect our business and reputation, including:

 

    the damage or destruction of vessels due to marine disaster such as a collision;

 

    the loss of a vessel due to piracy and terrorism;

 

    cargo and property losses or damage as a result of the foregoing or drastic causes such as human error, mechanical failure and bad weather;

 

    environmental accidents as a result of the foregoing; and

 

    business interruptions and delivery delays caused by mechanical failure, human error, war, terrorism, disease and quarantine, political action in various countries, labor strikes or adverse weather conditions.

Such occurrences could result in death or injury to persons, loss of property or environmental damage, delays in the delivery of cargo, loss of revenues from or termination of charter contracts, governmental fines, penalties or restrictions on conducting business, litigation with our employees, customers or third parties, higher insurance rates, and damage to our reputation and customer relationships generally. Although we maintain hull and machinery and war risks insurance, as well as protection and indemnity insurance, which may cover certain risks of loss resulting from such occurrences, our insurance coverage may be subject to caps or not cover such losses and any of these circumstances or events could increase our costs or lower our revenues. The involvement of our vessels in an environmental disaster may harm our reputation as a safe and reliable vessel owner and operator. Any of these results could have a material adverse effect on business, results of operations and financial condition, as well as our cash flows.

We are subject to various laws, regulations and conventions, including environmental and safety laws that could require significant expenditures both to maintain compliance with such laws and to pay for any uninsured environmental liabilities including any resulting from a spill or other environmental incident.

The shipping business and vessel operation are materially affected by government regulation in the form of international conventions, national, state and local laws, and regulations in force in the jurisdictions in which vessels operate, as well as in the country or countries of their registration. Governmental regulations, safety or other equipment standards, as well as compliance with standards imposed by maritime self-regulatory organizations and customer requirements or competition, may require us to make capital and other expenditures. Because such conventions, laws and regulations are often revised, we cannot predict the ultimate cost of complying with such conventions, laws and regulations, or the impact thereof on the fair market price or useful life of our vessels. In order to satisfy any such requirements, we may be required to take any of our vessels out of service for extended periods of time, with corresponding losses of revenues. In the future, market conditions may not justify these expenditures or enable us to operate our vessels, particularly older vessels, profitably during the remainder of their economic lives. This could lead to significant asset write downs. In addition, violations of environmental and safety regulations can result in substantial penalties and, in certain instances, seizure or detention of our vessels.

Additional conventions, laws and regulations may be adopted that could limit our ability to do business, require capital expenditures or otherwise increase our cost of doing business, which may materially adversely affect our operations, as well as the shipping industry generally. In various jurisdictions legislation has been enacted, or is under consideration, that would impose more stringent requirements on air pollution and effluent discharges from our vessels. For example, the International Maritime Organization (“IMO”) periodically proposes and adopts amendments to revise the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (“MARPOL”), such as the revision to Annex VI, which came into force on July 1, 2010. The revised Annex VI implements a phased reduction of the sulfur content of fuel and allows for stricter sulfur limits in designated emission control areas (“ECAs”). Thus far, ECAs have been formally adopted for the Baltic Sea area (limiting SOx emissions only), the North Sea area including the English Channel (limiting SOx emissions only) and the North American ECA (which came into effect on August 1, 2012 limiting SOx, NOx and particulate matter emissions). In October 2016, the IMO approved the designation of the North Sea and Baltic Sea as ECAs for NOx under Annex VI, which is scheduled for adoption in 2017 and would take effect in January 2021. The U.S. Caribbean Sea ECA entered into force on January 1, 2013 and has been effective since January 1, 2014, limiting SOx, NOx and particulate matter emissions. In January 2015, the limit for fuel oil sulfur levels fell to 0.10% m/m in ECAs established to limit SOx and particulate matter emissions.

 

12


Table of Contents

After considering the issue for many years, the IMO announced on October 27, 2016 that it was proceeding with a requirement for 0.5% m/m sulfur content in marine fuel (down from current levels of 3.5%) outside the ECAs starting on January 1, 2020. Under Annex VI, the 2020 date was subject to review as to the availability of the required fuel oil. Annex VI required the fuel availability review to be completed by 2018 but was ultimately completed in 2016. Therefore, by 2020, ships will be required to remove sulfur from emissions through the use of emission control equipment, or purchase marine fuel with 0.5% sulfur content, which may see increased demand and higher prices due to supply constraints. Installing pollution control equipment or using lower sulfur fuel could result in significantly increased costs to our company. Similarly, MARPOL Annex VI requires Tier III standards for NOx emissions to be applied to ships constructed and engines installed in ships operating in NOx ECAs from January 1, 2016.

Certain jurisdictions have adopted more stringent requirements. For instance, California has adopted more stringent low sulfur fuel requirements within California regulated waters. Compliance with new emissions standards could require modifications to vessels or the use of more expensive fuel. While it is unclear how new emissions standards will affect the employment of our vessels, over time it is possible that ships not retrofitted to comply with new standards may become less competitive.

In addition, the IMO, the U.S. and states within the U.S. have proposed or implemented requirements relating to the management of ballast water to prevent the harmful effects of foreign invasive species. These ballast water proposals and requirements are discussed below in the risk factor relating to ballast water.

The operation of vessels is also affected by the requirements set forth in the International Safety Management (“ISM”) Code. The ISM Code requires shipowners and bareboat charterers to develop and maintain an extensive Safety Management System (the “SMS”) that includes the adoption of a safety and environmental protection policy setting forth instructions and procedures for safe vessel operation and describing procedures for dealing with emergencies. Further to this, the IMO has introduced the first ever mandatory measures for an international greenhouse gas reduction regime for a global industry sector. These energy efficiency measures took effect on January 1, 2013 and apply to all ships of 400 gross tonnage and above. They include the development of a ship energy efficiency management plan (“SEEMP”) which is akin to a safety management plan, with which the industry will have to comply. The failure of a ship owner or bareboat charterer to comply with the ISM Code and IMO measures may subject such party to withdrawal of the permit to operate or manage the vessels, increased liability, decreased available insurance coverage for the affected vessels, and may result in a denial of access to, or detention in, certain ports.

We operate a fleet of vessels that are subject to national and international laws governing pollution from such vessels. Several international conventions impose and limit pollution liability from vessels. An owner of a tanker vessel carrying a cargo of “persistent oil” as defined by the International Convention for Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage (the “CLC”) is subject under the convention to strict liability for any pollution damage caused in a contracting state by an escape or discharge from cargo or bunker tanks. This liability is subject to a financial limit calculated by reference to the tonnage of the ship, and the right to limit liability may be lost if the spill is caused by the shipowner’s intentional or reckless conduct. Liability may also be incurred under the CLC for a bunker spill from the vessel even when she is not carrying such cargo, but is in ballast.

When a tanker is carrying clean oil products that do not constitute “persistent oil” that would be covered under the CLC, liability for any pollution damage will generally fall outside the CLC and will depend on other international conventions or domestic laws in the jurisdiction where the spillage occurs. The same principle applies to any pollution from the vessel in a jurisdiction, which is not a party to the CLC. The CLC applies in over 100 jurisdictions around the world, but it does not apply in the U.S., where the corresponding liability laws such as the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (the “OPA 90”) discussed below, are particularly stringent.

For vessel operations not covered by the CLC, including those operated under our fleet, international liability for oil pollution is governed by the International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage (the “Bunker Convention”). In 2001, the IMO adopted the Bunker Convention, which imposes strict liability on shipowners for pollution damage and response costs incurred in contracting states caused by discharges, or threatened discharges, of bunker oil from all classes of ships not covered by the CLC. The Bunker Convention also requires registered owners of ships over a certain size to maintain insurance to cover their liability for pollution damage in an amount equal to the limits of liability under the applicable national or international limitation regime, including liability limits calculated in accordance with the Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims 1976, as amended (the “1976 Convention”), discussed in more detail in the following paragraph. The Bunker Convention became effective in contracting states on November 21, 2008 and as of February 7, 2017, had 83 contracting states. In non-contracting states, liability for such bunker oil pollution typically is determined by the national or other domestic laws in the jurisdiction where the spillage occurs.

The CLC and Bunker Convention also provide vessel owners a right to limit their liability, depending on the applicable national or international regime. The CLC includes its own liability limits. The 1976 Convention is the most widely applicable international regime limiting maritime pollution liability. Rights to limit liability under the 1976 Convention are forfeited where a spill is caused by a shipowner’s intentional or reckless conduct. Certain jurisdictions have ratified the IMO’s Protocol of 1996 to the 1976 Convention, referred to herein as the “Protocol of 1996.” The Protocol of 1996 provides for substantially higher liability limits in those jurisdictions than the limits set forth in the 1976 Convention. Finally, some jurisdictions, such as the U.S., are not a party to either the 1976 Convention or the Protocol of 1996, and, therefore, a shipowner’s rights to limit liability for maritime pollution in such jurisdictions may be uncertain.

 

13


Table of Contents

Environmental legislation in the U.S. merits particular mention as it is in many respects more onerous than international laws, representing a high-water mark of regulation with which ship owners and operators must comply, and of liability likely to be incurred in the event of non-compliance or an incident causing pollution. Though it has been eight years since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico (the “Deepwater Horizon incident”), such regulation may become even stricter because of the incident’s impact. In the U.S., the OPA90 establishes an extensive regulatory and liability regime for the protection and cleanup of the environment from cargo and bunker oil spills from vessels, including tankers. The OPA 90 covers all owners and operators whose vessels trade in the U.S., its territories and possessions or whose vessels operate in U.S. waters, which includes the U.S.’s territorial sea and its 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone. Under the OPA 90, vessel owners, operators and bareboat charterers are “responsible parties” and are jointly, severally and strictly liable (unless the spill results solely from the act or omission of a third party, an act of God or an act of war) for all containment and clean-up costs and other damages arising from discharges or substantial threats of discharges, of oil from their vessels. The U.S. Congress has in the past considered bills to strengthen certain requirements of the OPA 90; similar legislation may be introduced in the future. Further, under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (“CERCLA”) and similar state laws, investigation and cleanup requirements for threatened or actual releases of hazardous substances may be imposed upon owners and operators of vessels, on a joint and several basis, regardless of fault or the legality of the original activity that resulted in the release of hazardous substances.

In addition to potential liability under the federal OPA 90, vessel owners may in some instances incur liability on an even more stringent basis under state law in the particular state where the spillage occurred. For example, California regulations prohibit the discharge of oil, require an oil contingency plan be filed with the state, require that the ship owner contract with an oil response organization and require a valid certificate of financial responsibility, all prior to the vessel entering state waters.

In recent years, the EU has become increasingly active in the field of regulation of maritime safety and protection of the environment. In some areas of regulation, the EU has introduced new laws without attempting to procure a corresponding amendment to international law. Notably, the EU adopted in 2005 a directive, as amended in 2009, on ship-source pollution, imposing criminal sanctions for pollution not only where pollution is caused by intent or recklessness (which would be an offence under MARPOL), but also where it is caused by “serious negligence.” The concept of “serious negligence” may be interpreted in practice to be little more than ordinary negligence. The directive could therefore result in criminal liability being incurred in circumstances where it would not be incurred under international law.

The EU has also issued Directive 2013/30/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of June 12, 2013 on safety of offshore oil and gas operations. The objective of this Directive is to reduce as much as possible the occurrence of major accidents relating to offshore oil and gas operations and to limit their consequences, thus increasing the protection of the marine environment and coastal economies against pollution, establishing minimum conditions for safe offshore exploration and exploitation of oil and gas and limiting possible disruptions to EU indigenous energy production, and to improve the response mechanisms in case of an accident. The Directive was implemented on July 19, 2015. As far as the environment is concerned, the U.K. has various new or amended regulations such as: the Offshore Petroleum Activities (Offshore Safety Directive) (Environmental Functions) Regulations 2015 (OSDEF), the 2015 amendments to the Merchant Shipping (Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Cooperation Convention) Regulations 1998 (OPRC 1998) and other environmental Directive requirements, specifically the Environmental Management System. The Offshore Petroleum Licensing (Offshore Safety Directive) Regulations 2015 will implement the licensing Directive requirements.

Criminal liability for a pollution incident could not only result in us incurring substantial penalties or fines, but may also, in some jurisdictions, facilitate civil liability claims for greater compensation than would otherwise have been payable.

We maintain insurance coverage for each owned vessel in our fleet against pollution liability risks in the amount of $1.0 billion in the aggregate for any one event. The insured risks include penalties and fines as well as civil liabilities and expenses resulting from accidental pollution. However, this insurance coverage is subject to exclusions, deductibles and other terms and conditions. If any liabilities or expenses fall within an exclusion from coverage, or if damages from a catastrophic incident exceed the aggregate liability of $1.0 billion for any one event, our cash flow, profitability and financial position would be adversely impacted.

We may be required to make significant investments in ballast water management, which may have a material adverse effect on our future performance, results of operations, and financial position.

As discussed above, the International Convention for the Control and Management of Vessels’ Ballast Water and Sediments (the “BWM Convention”) which was adopted in February 2004 aims to prevent the spread of harmful aquatic organisms from one region to another, by establishing standards and procedures for the management and control of ships’ ballast water and sediments. The BWM Convention’s implementing regulations call for a phased introduction of mandatory ballast water exchange requirements, to be replaced in time with mandatory concentration limits, as well as other obligations, including recordkeeping requirements and implementation of a Ballast Water and Sediments Management Plan. The BWM Convention stipulates that it will enter into force twelve months after it has been adopted by at least 30 states, the combined merchant fleets of which represent at least 35% of the gross tonnage of the world’s merchant shipping. With Finland’s accession to the Agreement on September 8, 2016, the 35% threshold was reached, and the BWM convention entered into force on September 8, 2017. Thereafter, on October 19, 2016, Panama also acceded to the BWM convention, adding its 18.02% of world gross tonnage. As of September 8, 2017, the BWM Convention had 69 contracting states for

 

14


Table of Contents

75.11% of world gross tonnage. Although new ships constructed after September 8, 2017 must comply on delivery with the BWM Convention, implementation of the BWM Convention has been delayed for existing vessels (constructed prior to September 8, 2017) for a further two years. For such existing vessels, installation of ballast water management systems must take place at the first renewal survey following September 8, 2017 (the date the BWM Convention entered into force). The BWM Convention requires ships to manage ballast water in a manner that removes, renders harmless or avoids the update or discharge of aquatic organisms and pathogens within ballast water and sediment. Recently updated Ballast Water and Sediment Management Plan guidance includes more robust testing and performance specifications. The entry of the BWM Convention and revised guidance, as well as similar ballast water treatment requirements in certain jurisdictions (such as the U.S. and states within the U.S.), will likely result in compliance costs relating to the installation of equipment on our vessels to treat ballast water before it is discharged and other additional ballast water management and reporting requirements. Investments in ballast water treatment may have a material adverse effect on our future performance, results of operations, cash flows and financial position.

Climate change and government laws and regulations related to climate change could negatively impact our financial condition.

We are and will be, directly and indirectly, subject to the effects of climate change and may, directly or indirectly, be affected by government laws and regulations related to climate change. A number of countries have adopted or are considering the adoption of, regulatory frameworks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In the U.S., the United States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) has declared greenhouse gases to be dangerous pollutants and has issued greenhouse gas reporting requirements for emissions sources in certain industries (which does not include the shipping industry). EPA does require owners of vessels subject to MARPOL Annex VI to maintain records for nitrogen oxides standards and in-use fuel specifications. In addition, while the emissions of greenhouse gases from international shipping are not subject to the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change(the “UNFCCC”), which requires adopting countries to implement national programs to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the IMO intends to develop limits on greenhouse gases from international shipping. It has responded to the global focus on climate change and greenhouse gas emissions by developing specific technical and operational efficiency measures and a work plan for market-based mechanisms in 2011. These include the mandatory measures of the ship energy efficiency management (“SEEMP”), outlined above, and an energy efficiency design index (“EEDI”) for new ships. The IMO is also considering its position on market-based measures through an expert working group. Among the numerous proposals being considered by the working group are the following: a port state levy based on the amount of fuel consumed by the vessel on its voyage to the port in question; a global emissions trading scheme which would allocate emissions allowances and set an emissions cap; and an international fund establishing a global reduction target for international shipping, to be set either by the UNFCCC or the IMO.

At its 64th session (2012), the IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (the “MEPC”) indicated that 2015 was the target year for member states to identify market-based measures for international shipping. At its 66th session in 2014, the MEPC continued its work on developing technical and operational measures relating to energy-efficiency measures for ships, following the entry into force of the mandatory efficiency measures on January 1, 2013. It adopted the 2014 Guidelines on the Method of Calculation of the Attained EEDI, applicable to new ships. It further adopted amendments to MARPOL Annex VI concerning the extension of the scope of application of the EEDI to Liquified Natural Gas (“LNG”) carriers, ro-ro cargo ships (vehicle carriers), ro-ro passenger ships and cruise passengers ships with nonconventional propulsion. At its 67th session (2014), the MEPC adopted the 2014 Guidelines on survey and certification of the EEDI, updating the previous version to reference ships fitted with dual-fuel engines using LNG and liquid fuel oil. The MEPC also adopted amendments to the 2013 Interim Guidelines for determining minimum propulsion power to maintain the maneuverability of ships in adverse conditions, to make the guidelines applicable to phase 1 (starting January 1, 2015) of the EEDI requirements. At its 68th session (2015), the MEPC amended the 2014 Guidelines on EEDI survey and certification as well as the method of calculating of EEDI for new ships, the latter of which was again amended at the 70th session (2016). At its 70th session, the MEPC also adopted mandatory requirements for ships of 5,000 gross tonnage or greater to collect fuel consumption data for each type of fuel used, and report the data to the flag State after the end of each calendar year.

Although regulation of greenhouse gas emissions in the shipping industry was discussed during the 2015 UN Climate Change Conference in Paris (the “Paris Conference”), the agreement reached among the 195 nations did not expressly reference the shipping industry. Following the Paris Conference, the IMO announced it would continue its efforts on this issue at the MEPC, and at its 70th session, the MEPC approved a Roadmap for developing a comprehensive GHG emissions reduction strategy for ships, which includes the goal of adopting an initial strategy and emission reduction commitments in 2018. The Roadmap also provides for additional studies and further intersessional work, to be continued at the 71st session in 2017, with a goal of adopting a revised strategy in 2023 to include short-, mid- and long-term reduction measures and schedules for implementation. In April 2018, the committee charged with creating the reduction strategy must finalize the initial draft of the strategy and submit a report to MEPC.

The EU announced in April 2007 that it planned to expand the EU emissions trading scheme (“ETS”) by adding vessels, as ETS-regulated businesses required to report on carbon emissions and subject to a credit trading system for carbon allowances. A proposal from the European Commission was expected if no global regime for reduction of seaborne emissions had been agreed to by the end of 2011. On October 1, 2012, the European Commission announced that it would propose measures to monitor, verify and report on greenhouse-gas emissions from the shipping sector. On June 28, 2013, the European Commission adopted a communication setting out a strategy for progressively including greenhouse gas emissions from maritime transport in the EU’s policy for reducing its overall greenhouse emissions. The first step proposed by the European Commission was an EU Regulation to an EU-wide system for the

 

15


Table of Contents

monitoring, reporting and verification of carbon dioxide emissions from large ships starting in 2018. The EU Regulation (2015/757) was adopted on April 29, 2015 and took effect on July 1, 2015, with monitoring, reporting and verification requirements beginning on January 1, 2018. This Regulation appears to be indicative of an intent to maintain pressure on the international negotiating process. The European Commission also adopted an Implementing Regulation, which entered into force in November 2016, setting templates for monitoring plans, emissions reports and compliance documents pursuant to Regulation 2015/757.

In February 2017, EU member states met to consider independently regulating the shipping industry under the ETS. On February 15, 2017, European Parliament voted in favor of a bill to include maritime shipping in the ETS by 2023 if the IMO has not promulgated a comparable system by 2021. In November 2017, the Council of Ministers, the EU’s main decision making body, agreed that the EU should act on shipping emissions by 2023 if the IMO fails to deliver effective global measures. Last year, IMO’s urgent call to action to bring about shipping greenhouse gas emissions reductions before 2023 was met with industry push-back in many countries. Depending on how fast IMO and the EU move on this issue, the ETS may result in additional compliance costs for our vessels.

We cannot predict with any degree of certainty what effect, if any possible climate change and government laws and regulations related to climate change will have on our operations, whether directly or indirectly. However, we believe that climate change, including the possible increase in severe weather events resulting from climate change, and government laws and regulations related to climate change may affect, directly or indirectly, (i) the cost of the vessels we may acquire in the future, (ii) our ability to continue to operate as we have in the past, (iii) the cost of operating our vessels, and (iv) insurance premiums, deductibles and the availability of coverage. As a result, our financial condition could be negatively impacted by significant climate change and related governmental regulation, and that impact could be material.

We are subject to vessel security regulations and will incur costs to comply with recently adopted regulations and we may be subject to costs to comply with similar regulations that may be adopted in the future in response to terrorism.

Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, there has been a variety of initiatives intended to enhance vessel security. On November 25, 2002, the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 (“MTSA”), came into effect. To implement certain portions of the MTSA, in July 2003, the U.S. Coast Guard issued regulations requiring the implementation of certain security requirements aboard vessels operating in waters subject to the jurisdiction of the U.S.. Similarly, in December 2002, amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, (“SOLAS”), created a new chapter of the convention dealing specifically with maritime security. The new chapter went into effect in July 2004, and imposes various detailed security obligations on vessels and port authorities, most of which are contained in the newly created International Ship and Port Facilities Code, or ISPS Code. Among the various requirements are:

 

    on-board installation of automatic information systems, (“AIS”), to enhance vessel-to-vessel and vessel-to-shore communications;

 

    on-board installation of ship security alert systems;

 

    the development of vessel security plans; and

 

    compliance with flag state security certification requirements.

Furthermore, additional security measures could be required in the future, which could have a significant financial impact on us. The U.S. Coast Guard regulations, intended to be aligned with international maritime security standards, exempt non-U.S. vessels from MTSA vessel security measures, provided such vessels have on board a valid International Ship Security Certificate, or ISSC, that attests to the vessel’s compliance with SOLAS security requirements and the ISPS Code. We will implement the various security measures addressed by the MTSA, SOLAS and the ISPS Code and take measures for the vessels to attain compliance with all applicable security requirements within the prescribed time periods. Although management does not believe these additional requirements will have a material financial impact on our operations, there can be no assurance that there will not be an interruption in operations to bring vessels into compliance with the applicable requirements and any such interruption could cause a decrease in charter revenues. Furthermore, additional security measures could be required in the future, which could have a significant financial impact on us.

The cost of vessel security measures has also been affected by acts of piracy against ships. Attacks of this kind have commonly resulted in vessels and their crews being detained for several months, and being released only on payment of large ransoms. Substantial loss of revenue and other costs may be incurred as a result of such detention. Although we insure against these losses to the extent practicable, the risk remains of uninsured losses, which could significantly affect our business. Costs are incurred in taking additional security measures in accordance with Best Management Practices to Deter Piracy, notably those contained in the BMP3 industry standard. A number of flag states have signed the 2009 New York Declaration, which expresses commitment to Best Management Practices in relation to piracy and calls for compliance with them as an essential part of compliance with the ISPS Code.

 

16


Table of Contents

Acts of piracy on ocean-going vessels could adversely affect our business.

Acts of piracy have historically affected ocean-going vessels trading in certain regions of the world, such as the South China Sea and the Gulf of Aden off the coast of Somalia. Piracy continues to occur in the Gulf of Aden off the coast of Somalia and increasingly in the Gulf of Guinea. Although both the frequency and success of attacks have diminished recently, we still consider potential acts of piracy to be a material risk to the international container shipping industry, and protection against this risk requires vigilance. Our vessels regularly travel through regions where pirates are active. Crew costs, including those due to employing onboard security guards, could increase in such circumstances. While the use of security guards is intended to deter and prevent the hijacking of our vessels, it could also increase our risk of liability for death or injury to persons or damage to personal property. In addition, while we believe the charterer remains liable for charter payments when a vessel is seized by pirates, the charterer may dispute this and withhold charter hire until the vessel is released. A charterer may also claim that a vessel seized by pirates was not “on-hire” for a certain number of days and it is therefore entitled to cancel the charter party, a claim that we would dispute. We may not be adequately insured to cover losses from these incidents, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and ability to make distributions. Crew costs could also increase in such circumstances. We may not be adequately insured to cover losses from acts of terrorism, piracy, regional conflicts and other armed actions.

Political and government instability, terrorist attacks, increased hostilities or war could lead to further economic instability, increased costs and disruption of our business.

We are an international company and conduct our operations primarily outside the U.S.. Changing economic, political and governmental conditions in the countries where we are engaged in business or where our vessels are registered will affect us. Terrorist attacks, such as the attacks in the U.S. on September 11, 2001 and the U.S.’ continuing response to these attacks, and in Paris on January 7, 2015 and on November 13, 2015, the bombings in Spain on March 11, 2004 and in Brussels on March 22, 2016, and the attacks in London on July 7, 2005, the recent conflicts in Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, Ukraine and other current and future conflicts, and the continuing response of the U.S. to these attacks, as well as the threat of future terrorist attacks, continue to cause uncertainty in the world financial markets, including the energy markets. Continuing hostilities in the Middle East may lead to additional armed conflicts or to further acts of terrorism and civil disturbance in the U.S. or elsewhere, which could result in increased volatility and turmoil in the financial markets and may contribute further to economic instability. Current and future conflicts and terrorist attacks may adversely affect our business, operating results, financial condition, ability to raise capital and future growth. Terrorist attacks on vessels, such as the October 2002 attack on the M/V Limburg, a VLCC not related to us, may in the future also negatively affect our operations and financial condition and directly impact our vessels or our customers.

Furthermore, our operations may be adversely affected by changing or adverse political and governmental conditions in the countries where our vessels are flagged or registered and in the regions where we otherwise engage in business. Any disruption caused by these factors may interfere with the operation of our vessels, which could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our operations may also be adversely affected by expropriation of vessels, taxes, regulation, tariffs, trade embargoes, economic sanctions or a disruption of or limit to trading activities, or other adverse events or circumstances in or affecting the countries and regions where we operate or where we may operate in the future.

Governments could requisition our vessels during a period of war or emergency, resulting in a loss of earnings

A government of the jurisdiction where one or more of our vessels are registered could requisition for title or seize our vessels. Requisition for title occurs when a government takes control of a vessel and becomes its owner. In addition, a government could requisition our vessels for hire. Requisition for hire occurs when a government takes control of a ship and effectively becomes the charterer at dictated charter rates. Generally, requisitions occur during a period of war or emergency, although governments may elect to requisition vessels in other circumstances. Although we would expect to be entitled to compensation in the event of a requisition of one or more of our vessels, the amount and timing of payment, if any, would be uncertain. Government requisition of one or more of our vessels may cause us to breach covenants in certain of our credit facilities, and could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations and financial condition.

A failure to pass inspection by classification societies could result in one or more vessels being unemployable unless and until they pass inspection, resulting in a loss of revenues from such vessels for that period and a corresponding decrease in operating cash flows.

The hull and machinery of every commercial vessel must be classed by a classification society authorized by its country of registry. The classification society certifies that a vessel is safe and seaworthy in accordance with the applicable rules and regulations of the country of registry of the vessel and with SOLAS. Our owned fleet is currently enrolled with Nippon Kaiji Kiokai, Bureau Veritas, Lloyd’s Register, DNV GL and American Bureau of Shipping.

A vessel must undergo an annual survey, an intermediate survey and a special survey. In lieu of a special survey, a vessel’s machinery may be on a continuous survey cycle, under which the machinery would be surveyed periodically over a five-year period. Our vessels are on special survey cycles for hull inspection and continuous survey cycles for machinery inspection. Every vessel is also required to be drydocked every two to three years for inspection of the underwater parts of such vessel.

 

17


Table of Contents

If any vessel fails any annual survey, intermediate survey or special survey, the vessel may be unable to trade between ports and, therefore, would be unemployable, potentially causing a negative impact on our revenues due to the loss of revenues from such vessel until she is able to trade again.

Increased inspection procedures and tighter import and export controls could increase costs and disrupt our business.

International shipping is subject to various security and customs inspection and related procedures in countries of origin and destination and trans-shipment points. Inspection procedures may result in the seizure of contents of our vessels, delays in the loading, offloading, trans-shipment or delivery and the levying of customs duties, fines or other penalties against us.

It is possible that changes to inspection procedures could impose additional financial and legal obligations on us. Changes to inspection procedures could also impose additional costs and obligations on our customers and may, in certain cases, render the shipment of certain types of cargo uneconomical or impractical. Any such changes or developments may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our insurance may be insufficient to cover losses that may occur to our property or result from our operations.

The operation of any vessel includes risks such as mechanical failure, collision, fire, contact with floating objects, property loss, cargo loss or damage and business interruption due to political circumstances in foreign countries, hostilities and labor strikes. In addition, there is always an inherent possibility of a marine disaster, including oil spills and other environmental mishaps. There are also liabilities arising from owning and operating vessels in international trade. We procure insurance for our fleet in relation to risks commonly insured against by vessel owners and operators. Our current insurance includes (i) hull and machinery and war risk insurance covering damage to our vessels’ hulls and machinery from, among other things, collisions and contact with fixed and floating objects, (ii) war risks insurance covering losses associated with the outbreak or escalation of hostilities and (iii) protection and indemnity insurance (which includes environmental damage) covering, among other things, third-party and crew liabilities such as expenses resulting from the injury or death of crew members, passengers and other third parties, the loss or damage to cargo, third-party claims arising from collisions with other vessels, damage to other third-party property and pollution arising from oil or other substances, and salvage, towing and other related costs, including wreck removal.

We can give no assurance that we are adequately insured against all risks or that our insurers will pay a particular claim. Even if our insurance coverage is adequate to cover our losses, we may not be able to obtain a timely replacement vessel in the event of a loss of a vessel. Furthermore, in the future, we may not be able to obtain adequate insurance coverage at reasonable rates for our fleet. For example, more stringent environmental regulations have led to increased costs for, and in the future may result in the lack of availability of, insurance against risks of environmental damage or pollution. We may also be subject to calls, or premiums, in amounts based not only on our own claim records but also on the claim records of all other members of the protection and indemnity associations through which we receive indemnity insurance coverage. There is no cap on our liability exposure for such calls or premiums payable to our protection and indemnity association. Our insurance policies also contain deductibles, limitations and exclusions, which, although we believe are standard in the shipping industry, may nevertheless increase our costs. A catastrophic oil spill or marine disaster could exceed our insurance coverage, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Any uninsured or underinsured loss could harm our business and financial condition. In addition, the insurance may be voidable by the insurers as a result of certain actions, such as vessels failing to maintain required certification.

Our charterers may engage in legally permitted trading in locations, which may still be subject to sanctions or boycott, such as Iran, Syria and Sudan. Our insurers may be contractually or by operation of law prohibited from honoring our insurance contract for such trading, which could result in reduced insurance coverage for losses incurred by the related vessels. Furthermore, our insurers and we may be prohibited from posting or otherwise be unable to post security in respect of any incident in such locations, resulting in the loss of use of the relevant vessel and negative publicity for our Company which could negatively impact our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Maritime claimants could arrest our vessels, which could interrupt our cash flow.

Crew members, suppliers of goods and services to a vessel, shippers or receivers of cargo and other parties may be entitled to a maritime lien against a vessel for unsatisfied debts, claims or damages, including, in some jurisdictions, for debts incurred by previous owners. In many jurisdictions, a maritime lien-holder may enforce its lien by arresting a vessel. The arrest or attachment of one or more of our vessels, if such arrest or attachment is not timely discharged, could interrupt our cash flows and could require us to pay large sums of money to have the arrest or attachment lifted. Any of these occurrences could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition as well as our cash flows. We are not currently aware of the existence of any such maritime lien on our vessels.

 

18


Table of Contents

In addition, in some jurisdictions, such as South Africa, under the “sister ship” theory of liability, a claimant may arrest both the vessel which is subject to the claimant’s maritime lien and any “associated” vessel, which is any vessel owned or controlled by the same owner. Claimants could try to assert “sister ship” liability against one vessel in our fleet for claims relating to another ship in the fleet.

The risks and costs associated with vessels increase as the vessels age.

The costs to operate and maintain a vessel in operation increase with the age of the vessel. The average age of the vessels in our fleet is 7.7 years, basis fully delivered fleet, and most dry bulk vessels have an expected life of approximately 25 years. In some instances, charterers prefer newer vessels that are more fuel efficient than older vessels. Cargo insurance rates also increase with the age of a vessel, making older vessels less desirable to charterers as well. Governmental regulations, safety or other equipment standards related to the age of the vessels may require expenditures for alterations or the addition of new equipment to our vessels and may restrict the type of activities in which these vessels may engage. We cannot assure you that, as our vessels age, market conditions will justify those expenditures or enable us to operate our vessels profitably during the remainder of their useful lives. If we sell vessels, we may have to sell them at a loss, and if charterers no longer charter-out vessels due to their age, our earnings could be materially adversely affected.

Technological innovation could reduce our charter hire income and the value of our vessels.

The charter hire rates and the value and operational life of a vessel are determined by a number of factors including the vessel’s efficiency, operational flexibility and physical life. Efficiency includes speed, fuel economy and the ability to load and discharge cargo quickly. Flexibility includes the ability to enter harbors, utilize related docking facilities and pass through canals and straits. The length of a vessel’s physical life is related to its original design and construction, its maintenance and the impact of the stress of operations. If new vessels are built that are more efficient or more flexible or have longer physical lives than our vessels, competition from these more technologically advanced vessels could adversely affect the amount of charter hire payments we receive for our vessels and the resale value of our vessels could significantly decrease. As a result, our results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

If we fail to manage our planned growth properly, we may not be able to expand our fleet successfully, which may adversely affect our overall financial position.

We have grown our fleet and business significantly. We intend to continue to expand our fleet in the future. Our growth will depend on:

 

    ongoing and anticipated economic conditions and charter rates;

 

    locating and acquiring suitable vessels;

 

    identifying reputable shipyards with available capacity and contracting with them for the construction of new vessels;

 

    integrating any acquired vessels successfully with our existing operations;

 

    enhancing our customer base;

 

    managing our expansion; and

 

    obtaining required financing, which could include debt, equity or combinations thereof.

Additionally, the marine transportation and logistics industries are capital intensive, traditionally using substantial amounts of indebtedness to finance vessel acquisitions, capital expenditures and working capital needs. If we finance the purchase of our vessels through the issuance of debt securities, it could result in:

 

    default and foreclosure on our assets if our operating cash flow after a business combination or asset acquisition were insufficient to pay our debt obligations;

 

    acceleration of our obligations to repay the indebtedness even if we have made all principal and interest payments when due if the debt security contained covenants that required the maintenance of certain financial ratios or reserves and any such covenant was breached without a waiver or renegotiation of that covenant;

 

    our immediate payment of all principal and accrued interest, if any, if the debt security was payable on demand; and

 

19


Table of Contents
    our inability to obtain additional financing, if necessary, if the debt security contained covenants restricting our ability to obtain additional financing while such security was outstanding.

In addition, our business plan and strategy is predicated on buying vessels at what we believe is near the low end of the cycle in what has typically been a cyclical industry. However, there is no assurance that shipping rates and vessels asset values will not sink lower, or that there will be an upswing in shipping costs or vessel asset values in the near-term or at all, in which case our business plan and strategy may not succeed in the near-term or at all. Growing any business by acquisition presents numerous risks such as undisclosed liabilities and obligations, difficulty experienced in obtaining additional qualified personnel and managing relationships with customers and suppliers and integrating newly acquired operations into existing infrastructures. We may not be successful in growing and may incur significant expenses and losses.

If we purchase any newbuilding vessels, delays, cancellations or non-completion of deliveries of newbuilding vessels could harm our operating results.

If we purchase any newbuilding vessels, the shipbuilder could fail to deliver the newbuilding vessel as agreed or their counterparty could cancel the purchase contract if the shipbuilder fails to meet its obligations. In addition, under charters we may enter into that are related to a newbuilding, if our delivery of the newbuilding to our customer is delayed, we may be required to pay liquidated damages during such delay. For prolonged delays, the customer may terminate the charter and, in addition to the resulting loss of revenues, we may be responsible for additional, substantial liquidated damages. We do not derive any revenue from a vessel until after its delivery and are required to pay substantial sums as progress payments during construction of a newbuilding. While we expect to have refund guarantees from financial institutions with respect to such progress payments in the event the vessel is not delivered by the shipyard or is otherwise not accepted by us, there is the potential that we may not be able to collect all portions of such refund guarantees, in which case we would lose the amounts we have advanced to the shipyards for such progress payments.

The completion and delivery of newbuildings could be delayed, cancelled or otherwise not completed because of:

 

    quality or engineering problems;

 

    changes in governmental regulations or maritime self-regulatory organization standards;

 

    work stoppages or other labor disturbances at the shipyard;

 

    bankruptcy or other financial crisis of the shipbuilder;

 

    a backlog of orders at the shipyard;

 

    political or economic disturbances;

 

    weather interference or catastrophic event, such as a major earthquake or fire;

 

    requests for changes to the original vessel specifications;

 

    shortages of or delays in the receipt of necessary construction materials, such as steel;

 

    inability to finance the construction or conversion of the vessels; or

 

    inability to obtain requisite permits or approvals.

If delivery of a vessel is materially delayed, it could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition and our ability to make cash distributions.

Although we have long-standing relationships with certain Japanese shipowners that provide us access to competitive contracts, we cannot assure you that we will always be able to maintain such relationships or that such contracts will continue to be available in the future.

We have long-standing relationships with certain Japanese shipowners that give us access to time charters at favorable rates and that, in some cases, include options to purchase the vessels at favorable prices relative to the current market. We cannot assure you that we will have such relationships indefinitely. In addition, there is no assurance that Japanese shipowners will generally make contracts available on the same or substantially similar terms in the future.

 

20


Table of Contents

The smuggling of drugs or other contraband onto our vessels may lead to governmental claims against us.

We expect that our vessels will call in ports in South America and other areas where smugglers attempt to hide drugs and other contraband on vessels, with or without the knowledge of crew members. Under some jurisdictions, vessels used for the conveyance of illegal drugs could subject the vessels to forfeiture to the government of such jurisdiction. To the extent our vessels are found with contraband, whether inside or attached to the hull of our vessel and whether with or without the knowledge of any of our crew, we may face governmental or other regulatory claims which could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows, financial condition and ability to pay dividends.

Our vessels may be subject to unbudgeted periods of off-hire, which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Under the terms of the charter agreements under which our vessels operate, or are expected to operate in the case of a newbuilding, when a vessel is “off-hire,” or not available for service or otherwise deficient in its condition or performance, the charterer generally is not required to pay the hire rate, and we will be responsible for all costs (including the cost of bunker fuel) unless the charterer is responsible for the circumstances giving rise to the lack of availability. A vessel generally will be deemed to be off-hire if there is an occurrence preventing the full working of the vessel due to, among other things:

 

    operational deficiencies;

 

    the removal of a vessel from the water for repairs, maintenance or inspection, which is referred to as drydocking;

 

    equipment breakdowns;

 

    delays due to accidents or deviations from course;

 

    occurrence of hostilities in the vessel’s flag state or in the event of piracy;

 

    crewing strikes, labor boycotts, certain vessel detentions or similar problems; or

 

    our failure to maintain the vessel in compliance with its specifications, contractual standards and applicable country of registry and international regulations or to provide the required crew.

Under some of our charters, the charterer is permitted to terminate the time charter if the vessel is off-hire for an extended period, which is generally defined as a period of 90 or more consecutive off-hire days. Under some circumstances, an event of force majeure may also permit the charterer to terminate the time charter or suspend payment of charter hire.

As we do not maintain off-hire insurance except in cases of loss of hire up to a limited number of days due to war or piracy events any extended off-hire period could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

Our international activities increase the compliance risks associated with economic and trade sanctions imposed by the U.S., the EU and other jurisdictions.

Our international operations and activities could expose us to risks associated with trade and economic sanctions prohibitions or other restrictions imposed by the U.S. or other governments or organizations, including the United Nations, the EU and its member countries. Under economic and trade sanctions laws, governments may seek to impose modifications to, prohibitions/restrictions on business practices and activities, and modifications to compliance programs, which may increase compliance costs, and, in the event of a violation, may subject us to fines and other penalties.

Iran

During the last few years until January 2016, the scope of sanctions imposed against Iran, the government of Iran and persons engaging in certain activities or doing certain business with and relating to Iran was expanded by a number of jurisdictions, including the U.S., the EU and Canada. In 2010, the U.S. enacted the Comprehensive Iran Sanctions Accountability and Divestment Act (“CISADA”), which expanded the scope of the former Iran Sanctions Act. The scope of U.S. sanctions against Iran were expanded subsequent to CISADA by, among other U.S. laws, the National Defense Authorization Act of 2012 (the “2012 NDAA”), the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (“ITRA”), Executive Order 13662, and the Iran Freedom and Counter-Proliferation Act of 2012 (“IFCA”). The foregoing laws, among other things, expanded the application of prohibitions to non-U.S. companies, such as our company, and introduced limits on the ability of non-U.S. companies and other non-U.S. persons to do business or trade with Iran when such activities relate to specific trade and investment activities involving Iran.

 

21


Table of Contents

U.S. economic sanctions on Iran fall into two general categories: “Primary” sanctions, which prohibit U.S. persons or U.S. companies and their foreign branches, U.S. citizens, U.S. permanent residents, and persons within the territory of the U.S. from engaging in all direct and indirect trade and other transactions with Iran without U.S. government authorization, and “secondary” sanctions, which are mainly nuclear-related sanctions. While most of the EU and U.S. nuclear-related sanctions with respect to Iran (including, inter alia, CISADA, ITRA, and IFCA) were lifted on January 16, 2016 through the implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (the “JCPOA”) entered into between the permanent members of the United Nations Security Council (China, France, Russia, the U.K. and the U.S.) and Germany, there are still certain limitations in place with which we need to comply. The primary sanctions with which U.S. persons or transactions with a U.S. nexus must comply are still in force and have not been lifted or relaxed, except in a very limited fashion. Additionally, the sanctions lifted under the JCPOA could be reimposed (“snapped back”) at any time if Iran violates the JCPOA or the U.S. withdraws from the JCPOA.

After the lifting of most of the nuclear-related sanctions on January 16, 2016, EU sanctions remain in place in relation to the export of arms and military goods, missiles-related goods and items that might be used for internal repression. The main nuclear-related EU sanctions, which remain in place, include restrictions on:

 

  i. Graphite and certain raw or semi-finished metals such as corrosion-resistant high-grade steel, iron, aluminium and alloys, titanium and alloys and nickel and alloys (as listed in Annex VIIB to EU Regulation 267/2012 as updated by EU Regulation 2015/1861 (the “EU Regulation”);

 

  ii. Goods listed in the Nuclear Suppliers Group list (listed in Annex I to the EU Regulation);

 

  iii. Goods that could contribute to nuclear-related or other activities inconsistent with the JCPOA (as listed in Annex II to the EU Regulation); and

 

  iv. Software designed for use in nuclear/military industries (as listed in Annex VIIA to the EU Regulation).

Dealing with the above is no longer prohibited, but prior authorization must be obtained first and is granted on a case-by-case basis. The remaining restrictions apply to the sale, supply, transfer or export, directly or indirectly to any Iranian person/for use in Iran, as well as the provision of technical assistance, financing or financial assistance in relation to the restricted activity. Certain individuals and entities remain sanctioned and the prohibition to make available, directly or indirectly, economic resources or assets to or for the benefit of sanctioned parties remains. “Economic resources” is widely defined and it remains prohibited to provide vessels for a fixture from which a sanctioned party (or parties related to a sanctioned party) directly or indirectly benefits. It is therefore still necessary to carry out due diligence on the parties and cargoes involved in fixtures involving Iran.

Russia/Ukraine

As a result of the crisis in Ukraine and the annexation of Crimea by Russia in 2014, both the U.S. and the EU have implemented sanctions against certain persons and entities.

The EU has imposed travel bans and asset freezes on certain persons and entities pursuant to which it is prohibited to make available, directly or indirectly, economic resources or assets to or for the benefit of the sanctioned parties. Certain Russian ports including Kerch Commercial Seaport; Sevastopol Commercial Seaport and Port Feodosia are subject to the above restrictions. Other entities are subject to sectoral sanctions, which limit the provision of equity and debt financing to the listed entities. In addition, various restrictions on trade have been implemented which, amongst others, include a prohibition on the import into the EU of goods originating in Crimea or Sevastopol as well as restrictions on trade in certain dual-use and military items and restrictions in relation to various items of technology associated with the oil industry for use in deep water exploration and production, Arctic oil exploration and production or shale oil projects in Russia. As such, it is important to carry out due diligence on the parties and cargoes involved in fixtures relating to Russia.

The U.S. has imposed sanctions against certain designated Russian entities and individuals (“U.S. Russian Sanctions Targets”). These sanctions block the property and all interests in property of the U.S. Russian Sanctions Targets. This effectively prohibits U.S. persons from engaging in any economic or commercial transactions with the U.S. Russian Sanctions Targets unless the same are authorized by the U.S. Treasury Department. Similar to EU sanctions, U.S. sanctions also entail restrictions on certain exports from the U.S. to Russia and the imposition of Sectoral Sanctions, which restrict the provision of equity and debt financing to designated Russian entities. While the prohibitions of these sanctions are not directly applicable to us, we have compliance measures in place to guard against transactions with U.S. Russian Sanctions Targets, which may involve the U.S. or U.S. persons and thus implicate prohibitions. The U.S. also maintains prohibitions on trade with Crimea.

The U.S.’s “Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act” (Public Law 115-44) (CAATSA), authorizes imposition of new sanctions on Iran, Russia, and North Korea. The CAATSA sanctions with respect to Russia have not actually been imposed or implemented. CAATSA sanctions on Iran and North Korea enhance existing sanctions.

 

22


Table of Contents

Venezuela-Related Sanctions

The U.S. sanctions with respect to Venezuela prohibit dealings with designated Venezuelan government officials, and curtail the provision of financing to PDVSA and other government entities. EU sanctions against Venezuela are primarily governed by EU Council Regulation 2017/2063 of 13 November 2017 concerning restrictive measures in view of the situation in Venezuela. This includes financial sanctions and restrictions on listed persons, an arms embargo, and related prohibitions and restrictions including restrictions related to internal repression.

Other U.S. Economic Sanctions Targets

In addition to Iran and certain Russian entities and individuals, as indicated above, the U.S. maintains economic sanctions against Syria, Cuba, North Korea, and sanctions against entities and individuals (such as entities and individuals in the foregoing targeted countries, designated terrorists, narcotics traffickers) whose names appear on the List of SDNs and Blocked Persons maintained by the U.S. Treasury Department (collectively, the “Sanctions Targets”). We are subject to the prohibitions of these sanctions to the extent that any transaction or activity we engage in involves Sanctions Targets and a U.S. person or otherwise has a nexus to the U.S..

Other E.U. Economic Sanctions Targets

The EU also maintains sanctions against Syria, North Korea and certain other countries and against individuals listed by the EU. These restrictions apply to our operations and as such, to the extent that these countries may be involved in any business it is important to carry out checks to ensure compliance with all relevant restrictions and to carry out due diligence checks on counterparties and cargoes.

Compliance

Considering the aforementioned prohibitions of U.S. as well as EU sanctions and the nature of our business, there is a sanctions risk for us due to the worldwide trade of our vessels, which we seek to minimize by following our corporate written Economic Sanctions Compliance Policy and Procedures and our compliance with all applicable sanctions and embargo laws and regulations. Although we intend to maintain such compliance, there can be no assurance that we will be in compliance in the future, particularly as the scope of certain laws may be unclear and may be subject to changing interpretations, and the law may change. Moreover, despite, for example, relevant provisions in charter parties forbidding the use of our vessels in trade that would violate economic sanctions, our charterers may nevertheless violate applicable sanctions and embargo laws and regulations and those violations could in turn negatively affect our reputation and be imputed to us. In addition, given our relationship with Navios Acquisition, Navios Partners, Navios Maritime Containers Inc. (“Navios Containers”) and Navios Midstream Partners L.P. (“Navios Midstream”), we cannot give any assurance that an adverse finding against Navios Acquisition, Navios Partners, Navios Containers or Navios Midstream by a governmental or legal authority or others with respect to the matters discussed herein or any future matter related to regulatory compliance by Navios Acquisition, Navios Partners, Navios Containers, Navios Midstream or ourselves will not have a material adverse impact on our business, reputation or the market price or trading of our common stock-units.

We are constantly monitoring developments in the U.S., the E.U. and other jurisdictions that maintain economic sanctions against Iran, other countries, and other sanctions targets, including developments in implementation and enforcement of such sanctions programs. Expansion of sanctions programs, embargoes and other restrictions in the future (including additional designations of countries and persons subject to sanctions), or modifications in how existing sanctions are interpreted or enforced, could prevent our vessels from calling in ports in sanctioned countries or could limit their cargoes. If any of the risks described above materialize, it could have a material adverse impact on our business and results of operations.

To reduce the risk of violating economic sanctions, we have a policy of compliance with applicable economic sanctions laws and have implemented and continue to implement and diligently follow compliance procedures to avoid economic sanctions violations.

We rely on critical information systems for the operation of our businesses, and the failure of any critical information system, including a cyber-security breach, may adversely impact our businesses.

We rely on information systems and networks in our operations and administration of our business. Information systems are vulnerable to software viruses, power failures and security breaches by computer hackers and cyber terrorists. We rely on industry-accepted security measures and technology to securely maintain confidential and proprietary information maintained on our information systems. However, we cannot guarantee that our information systems cannot be damaged or compromised. The unavailability of the information systems or the failure of these systems to perform as anticipated for any reason could disrupt our business and could result in decreased performance and increased operating costs, causing our business and results of operations to suffer. Any significant interruption or failure of our information systems or any significant breach of security could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition, as well as our cash flows.

 

23


Table of Contents

Changing laws and evolving reporting requirements could have an adverse effect on our business.

Changing laws, regulations and standards relating to reporting requirements, including the European Union General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”), may create additional compliance requirements for us. To maintain high standards of corporate governance and public disclosure, we have invested in, and intend to continue to invest in, reasonably necessary resources to comply with evolving standards.

GDPR broadens the scope of personal privacy laws to protect the rights of European Union citizens and requires organizations to report on data breaches within 72 hours and be bound by more stringent rules for obtaining the consent of individuals on how their data can be used. GDPR will become enforceable on May 25, 2018 and non-compliance may expose entities to significant fines or other regulatory claims, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial conditions, results of operations and cash flows.

We could be materially adversely affected by violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the U.K. Bribery Act, and anti-corruption laws in other applicable jurisdictions.

As an international shipping company, we may operate in countries known to have a reputation for corruption. The U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977 (the “FCPA”) and other anti-corruption laws and regulations in applicable jurisdictions generally prohibit companies registered with the SEC and their intermediaries from making improper payments to government officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Under the FCPA, U.S. companies may be held liable for some actions taken by strategic or local partners or representatives. Legislation in other countries includes the U.K. Bribery Act 2010 (the “U.K. Bribery Act”) which is broader in scope than the FCPA because it does not contain an exception for facilitation payments. We and our customers may be subject to these and similar anti-corruption laws in other applicable jurisdictions. Failure to comply with legal requirements could expose us to civil and/or criminal penalties, including fines, prosecution and significant reputational damage, all of which could materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations, including our relationships with our customers, and our financial results. Compliance with the FCPA, the U.K. Bribery Act and other applicable anti-corruption laws and related regulations and policies imposes potentially significant costs and operational burdens on us. Moreover, the compliance and monitoring mechanisms that we have in place including our Code of Ethics and our anti-bribery and anti-corruption policy, may not adequately prevent or detect all possible violations under applicable anti-bribery and anti-corruption legislation. However, we believe that the procedures we have in place to prevent bribery are adequate and that they should provide a defense in most circumstances to a violation or a mitigation of applicable penalties, at least under the U.K.’s Bribery Act.

We may be unable to attract and retain qualified, skilled employees or crew necessary to operate our business or may have to pay substantially increased costs for our employees and crew.

Our success will depend in part on our ability to attract, hire, train and retain highly skilled and qualified personnel. In crewing our vessels, we require technically skilled employees with specialized training who can perform physically demanding work. Competition to attract, hire, train and retain qualified crew members is intense. In addition, recently, the limited supply of, and increased demand for, well-qualified crew members, due to the increase in the size of global shipping fleet, has created upward pressure on crewing costs, which we generally bear under our period, time and spot charters. If we are not able to increase our hire rates to compensate for any crew cost increases, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected. Any inability we experience in the future to attract, hire, train and retain a sufficient number of qualified employees could impair our ability to manage, maintain and grow our business.

Our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer holds approximately 30.6% of our common stock and will be able to exert considerable influence over our actions; her failure to own a significant amount of our common stock or to be our Chief Executive Officer would constitute a default under our secured credit facilities.

Ms. Angeliki Frangou owns approximately 30.6% of the outstanding shares of our common stock directly or through her affiliates, and has previously filed an amended Schedule 13D indicating that she intends, subject to market conditions, to purchase up to $20.0 million of our common stock (as of March 31, 2018, she had purchased approximately $10.0 million of the total $20.0 million in value of our common stock). As the Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and a significant stockholder, she has the power to exert considerable influence over our actions and the outcome of matters on which our stockholders are entitled to vote including the election of directors and other significant corporate actions. The interests of Ms. Frangou may be different from your interests. Furthermore, if Ms. Frangou ceases to hold a minimum of 20% of our common stock, does not remain actively involved in the business, or ceases to be our Chief Executive Officer, then we will be in default under our secured credit facilities.

 

24


Table of Contents

The loss of key members of our senior management team could disrupt the management of our business.

We believe that our success depends on the continued contributions of the members of our senior management team, including Ms. Angeliki Frangou, our Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and principal stockholder. The loss of the services of Ms. Frangou or one of our other executive officers or senior management members could impair our ability to identify and secure new charter contracts, to maintain good customer relations and to otherwise manage our business, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance and our ability to compete.

Certain of our directors, officers, and principal stockholders are affiliated with entities engaged in business activities similar to those conducted by us, which may compete directly with us, causing such persons to have conflicts of interest.

Some of our directors, officers and principal stockholders have affiliations with entities that have similar business activities to those conducted by us. Certain of our directors are also directors of other shipping companies and they may enter similar businesses in the future. These other affiliations and business activities may give rise to certain conflicts of interest in the course of such individuals’ affiliation with us. Although we do not prevent our directors, officers and principal stockholders from having such affiliations, we use our best efforts to cause such individuals to comply with all applicable laws and regulations in addressing such conflicts of interest. Our officers and employee directors devote their full time and attention to our ongoing operations, and our non-employee directors devote such time as is necessary and required to satisfy their duties as directors of a public company.

Because we generate substantially all of our revenues in U.S. dollars but incur a portion of our expenses in other currencies, exchange rate fluctuations could cause us to suffer exchange rate losses, thereby increasing expenses and reducing income.

We engage in worldwide commerce with a variety of entities. Although our operations may expose us to certain levels of foreign currency risk, our transactions are predominantly U.S. dollar-denominated at the present. Additionally, our South American subsidiaries transact a nominal amount of their operations in Uruguayan pesos, Paraguayan Guaranies, Argentinean pesos and Brazilian Reales, whereas our wholly-owned vessel subsidiaries and the vessel management subsidiaries transact a nominal amount of their operations in Euros; however, all of the subsidiaries’ primary cash flows are U.S. dollar-denominated. In 2017, approximately 42.4% of our expenses were incurred in currencies other than U.S. dollars. Transactions in currencies other than the functional currency are translated at the exchange rate in effect at the date of each transaction. Expenses incurred in foreign currencies against which the U.S. dollar falls in value can increase, thereby decreasing our income. A change in exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and each of the foreign currencies listed above of 1.00% would change our net loss for the year ended December 31, 2017 by $1.5 million.

For example, as of December 31, 2017, the value of the U.S. dollar as compared to the Euro decreased by approximately 12.1% compared with the respective value as of December 31, 2016. A greater percentage of our transactions and expenses in the future may be denominated in currencies other than U.S. dollar. As part of our overall risk management policy, we attempt to hedge these risks in exchange rate fluctuations from time to time. We may not always be successful in such hedging activities and, as a result, our operating results could suffer as a result of non-hedged losses incurred as a result of exchange rate fluctuations.

We are incorporated in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, which does not have a well-developed body of corporate law.

Our corporate affairs are governed by our amended and restated articles of incorporation and by-laws and by the Marshall Islands Business Corporations Act (“BCA”). The provisions of the BCA are intended to resemble provisions of the corporation laws of a number of states in the U.S.. However, there have been few judicial cases in the Republic of the Marshall Islands interpreting the BCA. The rights and fiduciary responsibilities of directors under the law of the Republic of the Marshall Islands are not as clearly established as the rights and fiduciary responsibilities of directors under statutes or judicial precedent in existence in certain U.S. jurisdictions. Stockholder rights may differ as well. The BCA does specifically incorporate the non-statutory law, or judicial case law, of the State of Delaware and other states with substantially similar legislative provisions. Accordingly, you may have more difficulty protecting your interests in the face of actions by management, directors or controlling stockholders than you would in the case of a corporation incorporated in the State of Delaware or other U.S. jurisdictions.

We, and certain of our officers and directors, may be difficult to serve with process as we are incorporated in the Republic of the Marshall Islands and such persons may reside outside of the U.S..

We are a corporation organized under the laws of the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and all of our assets are located outside of the U.S.. In addition, the majority of our directors and officers are residents of non-U.S. jurisdictions. Substantial portions of the assets of these persons are located in Greece or other non-U.S. jurisdictions. Thus, it may not be possible for investors to affect service of process upon us, or our non-U.S. directors or officers, or to enforce any judgment obtained against these persons in U.S. courts. In addition, it may not be possible to enforce U.S. securities laws or judgments obtained in U.S. courts against these persons in a non-U.S. jurisdiction.

 

25


Table of Contents

Being a foreign private issuer exempts us from certain SEC and NYSE requirements.

We are a foreign private issuer within the meaning of rules promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). As such, we are exempt from certain provisions applicable to U.S. public companies including:

 

    the rules under the Exchange Act requiring the filing with the SEC of quarterly reports on Form 10-Q or current reports on Form 8-K;

 

    the sections of the Exchange Act regulating the solicitation of proxies, consents or authorizations in respect of a security registered under the Exchange Act;

 

    the provisions of Regulation FD aimed at preventing issuers from making selective disclosures of material information;

 

    the sections of the Exchange Act requiring insiders to file public reports of their stock ownership and trading activities and establishing insider liability for profits realized from any “short-swing” trading transaction (i.e., a purchase and sale, or sale and purchase, of the issuer’s equity securities within less than six months); and

 

    the obligation to obtain shareholder approval in connection with the approval of, and material revisions to, equity compensation plans.

Because of these exemptions, investors are not afforded the same protections or information generally available to investors holding shares in public companies organized in the U.S.

Risks Relating to Our Common Stock

Our stock price may be volatile, and investors in our common stock could lose all or part of their investment.

The following factors could cause the price of our common stock in the public market to fluctuate significantly:

 

    variations in our quarterly operating results;

 

    changes in market valuations of companies in our industry;

 

    fluctuations in stock market prices and volumes;

 

    issuance of common stock or other securities in the future;

 

    the addition or departure of key personnel;

 

    announcements by us or our competitors of new business or trade routes, acquisitions or joint ventures; and

 

    the other factors discussed elsewhere in this Annual Report.

Volatility in the market price of our common stock may prevent investors from being able to sell their common stock at or above the price; an investor pays for our common stock in an offering. In the past, class action litigation has often been brought against companies following periods of volatility in the market price of those companies’ common stock. We may become involved in this type of litigation in the future. Litigation is often expensive and diverts management’s attention and company resources and could have a material effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.

 

26


Table of Contents

Risks Relating to Our Series G and Series H and the Depositary Shares

Our Series G and Series H are subordinated to our debt obligations, and a holder’s interests could be diluted by the issuance of additional shares, including additional Series G, Series H and by other transactions.

Our Series G, with a liquidation preference of $2,500.00 per share and our Series H, with a liquidation preference of $2,500.00 per share (the Series G and the Series H together referred to as the “Series G and H”), both represented by American Depositary Shares (the “Depositary Shares”), are subordinated to all of our existing and future indebtedness. As of December 31, 2017, our total debt was $1,717.8 million. We may incur substantial additional debt from time to time in the future, and the terms of the Series G and H do not limit the amount of indebtedness we may incur. In February 2016, we announced the suspension of payment of quarterly dividends on our common stock and on the Series G and Series H. The payment of principal and interest on our debt reduces cash available for distribution to us and on our shares, including the Series G and H and the Depositary Shares, should such dividends be reinstated.

The issuance of additional preferred stock on a parity with or senior to our Series G and H would dilute the interests of the holders of our Series G and H, and any issuance of any preferred stock senior to or on parity with our Series G and H or additional indebtedness could affect our ability to pay dividends on, redeem or pay the liquidation preference on our Series G and H. No provisions relating to our Series G and H protect the holders of our Series G and H in the event of a highly leveraged or other transaction, including a merger or the sale, lease or conveyance of all or substantially all our assets or business, which might adversely affect the holders of our Series G and H.

Our Series G and H will rank pari passu with any other class or series of our capital stock established after the original issue date of the Series G and H that is not expressly subordinated or senior to the Series G and H (“Parity Securities”) as to the payment of dividends and amounts payable upon liquidation or reorganization. If less than all dividends payable with respect to the Series G and H and any Parity Securities are paid, any partial payment shall be made pro rata with respect to shares of Series G and H and any Parity Securities entitled to a dividend payment at such time in proportion to the aggregate amounts remaining due in respect of such shares at such time.

We may not have sufficient cash from our operations to enable us to pay dividends on or to redeem our Series G and H, and accordingly the Depositary Shares, as the case may be, following the payment of expenses and the establishment of any reserves.

In February 2016, we announced the suspension of payment of quarterly dividends on the Series G and Series H. On July 15, 2017, the Company reached six quarterly dividend payments in arrears relating to its Series G and Series H and as a result the respective dividend rates increased by 0.25%. We will reinstate and pay quarterly dividends on the Series G and H, and accordingly the Depositary Shares, only from funds legally available for such purpose when, as and if declared by our board of directors. We may not have sufficient cash available to reinstate such dividend or to pay dividends each quarter if and when reinstated. In addition, we may have insufficient cash available to redeem the Series G and H, and accordingly the Depositary Shares. The amount of cash we can use to pay dividends or redeem our Series G and H and the Depositary Shares depends upon the amount of cash we generate from our operations, which may fluctuate significantly, and other factors, including the following:

 

    changes in our operating cash flow, capital expenditure requirements, working capital requirements and other cash needs;

 

    the amount of any cash reserves established by our board of directors;

 

    restrictions under our credit facilities and other instruments and agreements governing our existing and future debt, including restrictions under our existing credit facilities and indentures governing our debt securities on our ability to pay dividends if an event of default has occurred and is continuing, or if the payment of the dividend would result in an event of default, and on our ability to redeem equity securities;

 

    restrictions under Marshall Islands law as described below; and

 

    our overall financial and operating performance, which, in turn, is subject to prevailing economic and competitive conditions and to the risks associated with the shipping industry, our dry bulk operations and the other factors described herein, many of which are beyond our control.

The amount of cash we generate from our operations may differ materially from our net income or loss for the period, which will be affected by noncash items, and our board of directors in its discretion may elect not to declare any dividends. We may incur other expenses or liabilities that could reduce or eliminate the cash available for distribution as dividends. As a result of these and the other factors mentioned above, we may pay dividends during periods when we record losses and may not pay dividends during periods when we record net income.

 

27


Table of Contents

Our ability to pay dividends on and to redeem our Series G and H, and therefore holders’ ability to receive payments on the Depositary Shares, is limited by the requirements of Marshall Islands law.

If we reinstate the payment of dividends, Marshall Islands law provides that we may pay dividends on and redeem the Series G and H only to the extent that assets are legally available for such purposes. Legally available assets generally are limited to our surplus, which essentially represents our retained earnings and the excess of consideration received by us for the sale of shares above the par value of the shares. In addition, under Marshall Islands law we may not pay dividends on or redeem Series G and H if we are insolvent or would be rendered insolvent by the payment of such a dividend or the making of such redemption.

The Series G and H represent perpetual equity interests.

The Series G and H represent perpetual equity interests in us and, unlike our indebtedness, will not give rise to a claim for payment of a principal amount at a particular date. As a result, holders of the Series G and H (and accordingly the Depositary Shares) may be required to bear the financial risks of an investment in the Series G and H (and accordingly the Depositary Shares) for an indefinite period of time. In addition, the Series G and H will rank junior to all our indebtedness and other liabilities, and any other senior securities we may issue in the future with respect to assets available to satisfy claims against us.

Holders of Depositary Shares have extremely limited voting rights, will have even more limited rights than holders of the Series G and H and may encounter difficulties in exercising some of such rights.

Voting rights of holders of Depositary Shares will be extremely limited. Our common stock is the only class of stock carrying full voting rights. Holders of the Series G and H, and accordingly holders of the Depositary Shares, generally have no voting rights. In February 2016, we announced the suspension of payment of quarterly dividends on the Series G and Series H. As such, (i) we have used commercially reasonable efforts to obtain an amendment to our articles of incorporation to effectuate any and all such changes thereto as may be necessary to permit either the Series G Preferred Shareholders or the Series H Preferred Shareholders, as the case may be, to exercise the voting rights described in the following clause (ii)(x), and (ii) if and when dividends payable on either the Series G or the Series H, as the case may be, are in arrears for six or more quarterly periods, whether or not consecutive (and whether or not such dividends shall have been declared and whether or not there are profits, surplus, or other funds legally available for the payment of dividends), then (x) if our articles of incorporation have been amended as described in the preceding clause (i), the holders of Series G or the holders of Series G, as the case may be, will have the right (voting together as a class with all other classes or series of parity securities upon which like voting rights have been conferred and are exercisable), to elect one additional director to serve on our board of directors, and the size of our board of directors will be increased as needed to accommodate such change (unless the size of our board of directors already has been increased by reason of the election of a director by holders of securities on parity with either the Series G or Series H, as the case may be, upon which like voting rights have been conferred and with which the Series G and H voted as a class for the election of such director), and (y) if our articles of incorporation have not been amended as described in the preceding clause (i), then, until such amendment is fully approved and effective, the dividend rate on the Series G or the Series H, as the case may be, shall increase by 25 basis points. At our respective Annual Meeting of stockholders held on December 15, 2016 and December 15, 2017, the Company proposed an amendment to our articles of incorporation to effectuate any and all such changes as were necessary to permit the Series G and/or Series H holders the ability to exercise the certain voting rights described above. These proposals failed to receive the affirmative vote of holders of two-thirds of the Company’s issued and outstanding common stock entitled to vote at the respective Annual Meeting, which was required to approve the proposal. Therefore, since the proposals failed and the dividends for the Series G and Series H are in arrears for six or more quarterly periods the dividend rate on the Series G and Series H have increased by 25 basis points respectively. There can be no assurance that any such further proposal to our stockholders to amend our articles of incorporation will be approved by our common stockholders.

Furthermore, holders of the Depositary Shares may encounter difficulties in exercising any voting rights acquired by the Series G or the Series H for as long as they hold the Depositary Shares rather than the Series G or the Series H. For example, holders of the Depositary Shares will not be entitled to vote at meetings of holders of Series G or of the Series H, and they will only be able to exercise their limited voting rights by giving timely instructions to The Bank of New York Mellon (the “Depositary”) in advance of any meeting of holders of Series G or the Series H, as the case may be. The Depositary will be the holder of the Series G or the Series H underlying the Depositary Shares and holders may exercise voting rights with respect to the Series G or the Series H represented by the Depositary Shares only in accordance with the deposit agreement (the “Deposit Agreement”) relating to the Depositary Shares. To the limited extent permitted by the Deposit Agreement, the holders of the Depositary Shares should be able to direct the Depositary to vote the underlying Series G or the Series H, as the case may be, in accordance with their individual instructions. Nevertheless, holders of Depositary Shares may not receive voting materials in time to instruct the Depositary to vote the Series G or the Series H, as the case may be, underlying their Depositary Shares. In addition, the Depositary and its agents are not responsible for failing to carry out voting instructions of the holders of Depositary Shares or for the manner of carrying out such instructions. Accordingly, holders of Depositary Shares may not be able to exercise voting rights, and they will have little, if any, recourse if the underlying Series G or the Series H, as the case may be, is not voted as requested.

 

28


Table of Contents

The Depositary Shares lack a well developed trading market. Various factors may adversely affect the price of the Depositary Shares.

Even though the Depositary Shares are listed on the NYSE, there may be little or no secondary market for the Depositary Shares, in which case the trading price of the Depositary Shares could be adversely affected and a holder’s ability to transfer its securities will be limited. The Depositary Shares may trade at prices lower than the offering price and the secondary market may not provide sufficient liquidity. In addition, since the Series G and Series H do not have a stated maturity date, investors seeking liquidity in the Depositary Shares will be limited to selling their Depositary Shares in the secondary market absent redemption by us. We do not expect that there will be any other trading market for the Series G and Series H except as represented by the Depositary Shares.

Other factors, some of which are beyond our control, will also influence the market prices of the Depositary Shares. Factors that might influence the market prices of the Depositary Shares include:

 

    whether we are able to reinstate dividends on the Series G and Series H;

 

    the market for similar securities;

 

    our issuance of debt or preferred equity securities;

 

    our creditworthiness;

 

    our financial condition, results of operations and prospects; and

 

    economic, financial, geopolitical, regulatory or judicial events that affect us or the financial markets generally.

Accordingly, the Depositary Shares that an investor purchases may trade at a discount to their purchase price.

The Series G and H represented by the Depositary Shares have not been rated, and ratings of any other of our securities may affect the trading price of the Depositary Shares.

We have not sought to obtain a rating for the Series G and H, and both stocks may never be rated. It is possible, however, that one or more rating agencies might independently determine to assign a rating to either the Series G or the Series H or that we may elect to obtain a rating of either our Series G or the Series H in the future. In addition, we have issued securities that are rated and may elect to issue other securities for which we may seek to obtain a rating. Any ratings that are assigned to the Series G or the Series H in the future, that have been issued on our outstanding securities or that may be issued on our other securities, if they are lower than market expectations or are subsequently lowered or withdrawn, could imply a lower relative value for the Series G or the Series H and could adversely affect the market for or the market value of the Depositary Shares of the Series G and H Preferred Shares respectively. Ratings only reflect the views of the issuing rating agency or agencies and such ratings could at any time be revised downward or withdrawn entirely at the discretion of the issuing rating agency. A rating is not a recommendation to purchase, sell or hold any particular security, including the Series G and H and the Depositary Shares. Ratings do not reflect market prices or suitability of a security for a particular investor and any future rating of the Series G and H and the Depositary Shares may not reflect all risks related to us and our business, or the structure or market value of the Series G and H and the Depositary Shares.

The amount of the liquidation preference of our Series G and H is fixed and holders will have no right to receive any greater payment regardless of the circumstances.

The payment due upon liquidation for both our Series G and H is fixed at the liquidation preference of $2,500.00 per share (equivalent to $25.00 per Depositary Share) plus accumulated and unpaid dividends to the date of liquidation (whether or not declared). If in the case of our liquidation, there are remaining assets to be distributed after payment of this amount, holders will have no right to receive or to participate in these amounts. Furthermore, if the market price for the Series G or the Series H, as the case may be, is greater than the liquidation preference, holders will have no right to receive the market price from us upon our liquidation.

The Series G and H are only redeemable at our option and investors should not expect us to redeem either the Series G or the Series H on the dates they respectively become redeemable or on any particular date afterwards.

We may redeem, at our option, all or from time to time part of the Series G or the Series H on or after January 28, 2019 and July 8, 2019 respectively. If we redeem the Series G, holders of the Series G will be entitled to receive a redemption price equal to $2,500.00 per share (equivalent to $25.00 per Depositary Share) plus accumulated and unpaid dividends to the date of redemption (whether or not declared). If we redeem the Series H, holders of the Series H will be entitled to receive a redemption price equal to $2,500.00 per share (equivalent to $25.00 per Depositary Share) plus accumulated and unpaid dividends to the date of redemption (whether or not declared). Any decision we may make at any time to propose redemption of either the Series G or the Series H will depend upon, among other things, our evaluation of our capital position, the composition of our shareholders’ equity and general market conditions at that time. In addition, investors might not be able to reinvest the money they receive upon redemption of the Series G or the Series H, as the case may be, in a similar security or at similar rates. We may elect to exercise our partial redemption right on multiple occasions.

 

29


Table of Contents

Holders of Depositary Shares may be subject to additional risks related to holding Depositary Shares rather than shares.

Because holders of Depositary Shares do not hold their shares directly, they are subject to the following additional risks, among others:

 

    a holder of Depositary Shares will not be treated as one of our direct shareholders and may not be able to exercise shareholder rights;

 

    distributions on the Series G and H represented by the Depositary Shares will be paid to the Depositary, and before the Depositary makes a distribution to holder on behalf of the Depositary Shares, withholding taxes or other governmental charges, if any, that must be paid will be deducted;

 

    we and the Depositary may amend or terminate the Deposit Agreement without the consent of holders of the Depositary Shares in a manner that could prejudice holders of Depositary Shares or that could affect their ability to transfer Depositary Shares, among others; and

 

    the Depositary may take other actions inconsistent with the best interests of holders of Depositary Shares.

Risks Relating to Our Debt

We have substantial debt and may incur substantial additional debt, including secured debt, which could adversely affect our financial health and our ability to obtain financing in the future, react to changes in our business and make payments under the notes.

As of December 31, 2017, we had $1,717.8 million in aggregate principal amount of debt outstanding, of which $697.2 million was unsecured.

Our substantial debt could have important consequences to holders of our common stock. Because of our substantial debt:

 

    our ability to obtain additional financing for working capital, capital expenditures, debt service requirements, vessel or other acquisitions or general corporate purposes and our ability to satisfy our obligations with respect to our debt may be impaired in the future;

 

    a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations must be dedicated to the payment of principal and interest on our indebtedness, thereby reducing the funds available to us for other purposes;

 

    we will be exposed to the risk of increased interest rates because our borrowings under our senior secured credit facilities will be at variable rates of interest;

 

    it may be more difficult for us to satisfy our obligations to our lenders, resulting in possible defaults on and acceleration of such indebtedness;

 

    we may be more vulnerable to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

 

    we may be at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors with less debt or comparable debt at more favorable interest rates and, as a result, we may not be better positioned to withstand economic downturns;

 

    our ability to refinance indebtedness may be limited or the associated costs may increase; and

 

    our flexibility to adjust to changing market conditions and ability to withstand competitive pressures could be limited, or we may be prevented from carrying out capital expenditures that are necessary or important to our growth strategy and efforts to improve operating margins or our business.

We and our subsidiaries may be able to incur substantial additional indebtedness in the future as the terms of the indenture governing our 11.25% Senior Secured Notes due 2022 (the “2022 Senior Secured Notes”) and the indenture governing our 7.375% First Priority Ship Mortgage Notes due 2022 (the “2022 Notes”) do not fully prohibit us or our subsidiaries from doing so. The terms of the indenture governing the 7.25% Senior Notes due 2022 (the “2022 Logistics Senior Notes”) of Navios South American Logistics (“Navios Logistics”), the agreements governing the terms of Term Loan B Facility (the “Term Loan B Facility”) and the

 

30


Table of Contents

agreements governing the terms of the other indebtedness of Navios Logistics also permit Navios Logistics to incur substantial additional indebtedness in accordance with the terms of such agreements. If new debt is added to our current debt levels, the related risks that we now face would increase and we may not be able to meet all of our debt obligations.

The agreements and instruments governing our debt contain restrictions and limitations that could significantly impact our ability to operate our business.

Our secured credit facilities and our indentures impose certain operating and financial restrictions on us. These restrictions limit our ability to:

 

    incur or guarantee additional indebtedness;

 

    create liens on our assets;

 

    make new investments;

 

    engage in mergers and acquisitions;

 

    pay dividends or redeem capital stock;

 

    make capital expenditures;

 

    engage in certain FFA trading activities;

 

    change the flag, class or commercial and technical management of our vessels;

 

    enter into long-term charter arrangements without the consent of the lender; and

 

    sell any of our vessels.

The agreements governing the terms of Navios Logistics’ indebtedness impose similar restrictions upon Navios Logistics.

Therefore, we and Navios Logistics will need to seek permission from our respective lenders in order to engage in some corporate and commercial actions that believe would be in the best interest of our respective business, and a denial of permission may make it difficult for us or Navios Logistics to successfully execute our business strategy or effectively compete with companies that are not similarly restricted. The interests of our and Navios Logistics’ lenders may be different from our respective interests or those of our holders of common stock, and we cannot guarantee that we or Navios Logistics will be able to obtain the permission of lenders when needed. This may prevent us or Navios Logistics from taking actions that are in best interests of us, Navios Logistics or our stockholders. Any future debt agreements may include similar or more restrictive restrictions.

Our ability to generate the significant amount of cash needed to pay interest and principal and otherwise service our debt and our ability to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness or obtain additional financing depend on multiple factors, many of which may be beyond our control.

The ability of us and Navios Logistics to make scheduled payments on or to refinance our respective debt obligations will depend on our respective financial and operating performance, which, in turn, will be subject to prevailing economic and competitive conditions and to the financial and business factors, many of which may be beyond the control of us and Navios Logistics.

The principal and interest on such debt will be paid in cash. The payments under our and Navios Logistics’ debt will limit funds otherwise available for our respective working capital, capital expenditures, vessel acquisitions and other purposes. As a result of these obligations, the current liabilities us or Navios Logistics may exceed our respective current assets. We or Navios Logistics may need to take on additional debt as we expand our respective fleets or other operations, which could increase our respective ratio of debt to equity. The need to service our respective debt may limit funds available for other purposes, and our or Navios Logistics’ inability to service debt in the future could lead to acceleration of such debt, the foreclosure on assets such as owned vessels or otherwise negatively affect us.

We may be unable to raise funds necessary to finance the change of control repurchase offer required by the indentures governing our outstanding notes and our secured credit facilities.

The indenture governing the 2022 Senior Secured Notes, the indenture governing the 2022 Notes, the indentures governing the 2022 Logistics Senior Notes and our and Navios Logistics’ secured credit facilities contain certain change of control provisions. If we or Navios Logistics experience specified changes of control under our respective notes, we or Navios Logistics, as the case may be, will be required to make an offer to repurchase all of our respective outstanding notes (unless otherwise redeemed) at a price equal to 101% of the principal amount thereof plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, to the repurchase date. The occurrence of specified events that would constitute a change of control may constitute a default under our and Navios Logistics’ secured credit

 

31


Table of Contents

facilities. In the event of a change of control under these debt agreements, we cannot assure you that we would have sufficient assets to satisfy all of our obligations under these debt agreements, including but not limited to, repaying all indebtedness outstanding under the applicable secured credit facilities or repurchasing the applicable notes.

If the volatility in the London InterBank Offered Rate, or LIBOR, continues, it could affect our profitability, earnings and cash flow.

LIBOR has been volatile, with the spread between LIBOR and the prime lending rate widening significantly at times. These conditions are the result of the recent disruptions in the international credit markets. Because the interest rates borne by our outstanding indebtedness fluctuate with changes in LIBOR, if this volatility were to continue, it would affect the amount of interest payable on our debt, which in turn, could have an adverse effect on our profitability, earnings and cash flow. See also “Item 11 Qualitative and Quantitative Disclosures about Market Risk.”

Furthermore, interest in most loan agreements in our industry has been based on published LIBOR rates. Recently, however, lenders have insisted on provisions that entitle the lenders, in their discretion, to replace published LIBOR as the base for the interest calculation with their cost-of-funds rate. Such provisions could significantly increase our lending costs, which would have an adverse effect on our profitability, earnings and cash flow.

The market values of our vessels, which have declined from historically high levels, may fluctuate significantly, which could cause us to breach covenants in our credit facilities and result in the foreclosure of our mortgaged vessels.

Factors that influence vessel values include:

 

    number of newbuilding deliveries;

 

    number of vessels scrapped or otherwise removed from the total fleet;

 

    changes in environmental and other regulations that may limit the useful life of vessels;

 

    changes in global dry cargo commodity supply;

 

    types and sizes of vessels;

 

    development viability and increase in use of other modes of transportation;

 

    cost of vessel acquisitions;

 

    cost of newbuilding vessels;

 

    governmental or other regulations;

 

    prevailing level of charter rates;

 

    general economic and market conditions affecting the shipping industry; and

 

    the cost of retrofitting or modifying existing ships to respond to technological advances in vessel design or equipment, changes in applicable environmental or other regulations or standards, or otherwise.

If the market values of our owned vessels decrease, we may breach covenants contained in our secured credit facilities. If we breach such covenants and are unable to remedy any relevant breach, our lenders could accelerate our debt and foreclose on the collateral, including our vessels. Any loss of vessels would significantly decrease our ability to generate positive cash flow from operations and, therefore, service our debt. In addition, if the book value of a vessel is impaired due to unfavorable market conditions, or a vessel is sold at a price below its book value, we would incur a loss. Navios Logistics may be subject to similar ramifications under its credit facilities if the market values of its owned vessels decrease.

In addition, as vessels grow older, they generally decline in value. We will review our vessels for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be recoverable. We review certain indicators of potential impairment, such as undiscounted projected operating cash flows expected from the future operation of the vessels, which can be volatile for vessels employed on short-term charters or in the spot market. Any impairment charges incurred as a result of declines in charter rates would negatively affect our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, if we sell any vessel at a time when vessel prices have fallen and before we have recorded an impairment adjustment to our financial statements, the sale may be at less than the vessel’s carrying amount on our financial statements, resulting in a loss and a reduction in earnings.

 

32


Table of Contents

We may require additional financing to acquire vessels or business or to exercise vessel purchase options, and such financing may not be available.

In the future, we may be required to make substantial cash outlays to exercise options or to acquire vessels or business and will need additional financing to cover all or a portion of the purchase prices. We intend to cover the cost of such items with new debt collateralized by the vessels to be acquired, if applicable, but there can be no assurance that we will generate sufficient cash or that debt financing will be available. Moreover, the covenants in our senior secured credit facility, the indentures or other debt, may make it more difficult to obtain such financing by imposing restrictions on what we can offer as collateral.

We have substantial equity investments in seven companies, six of which are not consolidated in our financial results, and our investment in such companies is subject to the risks related to their respective businesses.

As of December 31, 2017, we had a 63.8% ownership interest in Navios Logistics, and, as a result, Navios Logistics is a consolidated subsidiary. As such, the income and losses relating to Navios Logistics and the indebtedness and other liabilities of Navios Logistics are shown in our consolidated financial statements.

We also have substantial equity investments in two public companies that are accounted for under the equity method — Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners. As of December 31, 2017, we held 42.9% of the voting stock and 46.2% of the economic interest of Navios Acquisition and 20.8% of the equity interest in Navios Partners (including a 2.0% general partner interest). As of such date, the carrying value of our investments in these two affiliated companies amounted to $166.4 million.

In addition to the value of our investment, we receive dividend payments relating to our investments. As a result of our investment, in fiscal year 2017, we received $14.6 million in dividends from Navios Acquisition. Furthermore, we receive management and general and administrative fees from Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners, which amounted to $104.0 million and $70.5 million, respectively, in fiscal year 2017.

On October 9, 2013, Navios Holdings, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners established Navios Europe Inc. (“Navios Europe I”) and had economic interests of 47.5%, 47.5% and 5.0%, respectively and 50%, 50% and 0%, voting interests, respectively. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Holdings portion of the Navios Term Loans I (as defined herein) relating to Navios Europe I was $4.8 million.

On February 18, 2015, Navios Holdings, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners established Navios Europe (II) Inc. (“Navios Europe II”) and had economic interests of 47.5%, 47.5% and 5.0%, respectively and voting interests of 50%, 50% and 0%, respectively. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Holdings portion of the Navios Term Loans II (as defined herein) relating to Navios Europe II was $6.7 million.

On June 8, 2017, Navios Containers completed a private placement in which Navios Holdings invested $5.0 million. Navios Containers registered its shares on the Norwegian Over-The-Counter Market (N-OTC) on June 12, 2017 under the ticker “NMCI”. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Holdings owned 3.4% of Navios Containers’ common stock and warrants, for 1.7% of the equity of Navios Containers and the carrying amount of the investment in Navios Containers was $5.2 million.

During the year ended December 31, 2017, the Company received shares of Pan Ocean Co. Ltd (“STX”) as partial compensation for the claims filed under the Korean court for all unpaid amounts in respect of the employment of the Company’s vessels and their carrying value amounted to $0.2 million as of December 31, 2017. During the year ended December 31, 2013, the Company received shares of Korea Line Corporation (“KLC”) and during the year ended December 31, 2015 the Company received shares of STX. During the third quarter of 2016, the Company sold all its KLC and STX securities it held at the time.

Our ownership interest in Navios Logistics, Navios Acquisition, Navios Partners, Navios Containers, Navios Europe I, Navios Europe II, STX and the reflection of such companies (or the investment relating thereto) on our balance sheets and any income generated from or related to such companies are subject to a variety of risks, including risks relating to the respective business of Navios Logistics, Navios Acquisition, Navios Partners, Navios Containers, Navios Europe I and Navios Europe II as disclosed in their respective public filings with the SEC or management reports. The occurrence of any such risks may negatively affect our financial condition.

We evaluate our investments in Navios Acquisition, Navios Partners, Navios Containers, Navios Europe I, Navios Europe II and STX for “other-than-temporary impairment” (“OTTI”) on a quarterly basis. Consideration is given to (i) the length of time and the extent to which the fair value has been less than the carrying value, (ii) their financial condition and near term prospects, and (iii) the intent and ability of the Company to retain our investment in these companies, for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in fair value.

As of December 31, 2017, management considers the decline in the market value of its investment in Navios Acquisition to be temporary. However, there is the potential for future impairment changes relative to this security if its respective fair value does not recover and an OTTI analysis indicates such write down is necessary, which may have a material adverse impact on our results of operations in the period recognized. During the year ended December 31, 2017, we did not recognize any impairment loss in earnings.

 

33


Table of Contents

During the year ended December 31, 2016, the Company considered the decline in fair value of its investment in Navios Partners and Navios Acquisition as “other-than-temporary” and therefore, recognized a loss of $228.0 million in the accompanying consolidated statement of comprehensive (loss)/income.

During each of the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, the Company considered the decline in fair value of the KLC shares as “other-than-temporary” and therefore, recognized a loss out of accumulated other comprehensive income /(loss) of $0.3 million and $1.8 million, respectively. The respective loss was included within the caption “Other expense” in the accompanying consolidated statement of comprehensive (loss)/income.

Risks Relating to Navios Logistics

Navios Logistics’ grain port business has seasonal components linked to the grain harvests in the region. At times throughout the year, the capacity of its grain port, including the loading and unloading operations, as well as the space in silos is exceeded, which could materially adversely affect its operations and revenues.

A significant portion of Navios Logistics’ grain port business is derived from handling and storage of soybeans and other agricultural products produced in the Hidrovia, mainly during the season between April and September. This seasonal effect could, in turn, increase the inflow and outflow of barges and vessels in its dry port and cause the space in its silos to be exceeded, which in turn would affect its timely operations or its ability to satisfy the increased demand. Inability to provide services in a timely manner may have a negative impact on its clients’ satisfaction and result in loss of existing contracts or inability to obtain new contracts.

Navios Logistics depends on a few significant customers for a large part of its revenues and the loss of one or more of these customers could materially and adversely affect its revenues.

In each of Navios Logistics’ businesses, a significant part of its revenues is derived from a small number of customers. Navios Logistics expect that a small number of customers will continue to generate a substantial portion of our revenues for the foreseeable future. For the year ended December 31, 2017, its three largest customers, Vale International S.A. (“Vale”), YPF S.A. (“YPF”) and Axion Energy Argentina S.A. (“Axion Energy”), accounted for 20.3%, 13.7% and 12.7% of its revenues, respectively, and its five largest customers accounted for approximately 61.9% of its revenues. For the year ended December 31, 2016, Navios Logistics’ two largest customers, Vale, Axion Energy and Cammesa S.A. (“Cammesa”), accounted for 28.0%, 13.8% and 11.5%, of its revenues, respectively, and its five largest customers accounted for approximately 67.4% of its revenues. For the year ended December 31, 2015, Navios Logistics’ two largest customers, Vale and Cammesa, accounted for 27.8% and 12.9% of its revenues, respectively, and its five largest customers accounted for approximately 61.7% of its revenues. In addition, some of Navios Logistics’ customers, including many of its most significant customers, operate their own vessels and/or barges as well as port terminals. These customers may decide to cease or reduce the use of its services for various reasons, including employment of their own vessels or port terminals as applicable. The loss of any of its significant customers, including our large take-or-pay customers or the change of the contractual terms of one of our most significant take-or-pay contracts or any significant dispute with one of these customers could materially adversely affect its financial condition and its results of operations.

If one or more of Navios Logistics’ customers does not perform under one or more contracts with it and Navios Logistics is not able to find a replacement contract, or if a customer exercises certain rights to terminate the contract, Navios Logistics could suffer a loss of revenues that could materially adversely affect its business, financial condition and results of operations.

Navios Logistics could lose a customer or the benefits of a contract if, among other things:

 

    the customer fails to make payments because of its financial inability, the curtailment or cessation of its operations, disagreements with Navios Logistics or otherwise;

 

    the customer terminates the contract because Navios Logistics fails to meet their contracted storage needs and/or the contracted operational performance;

 

    the customer terminates the contract because Navios Logistics fails to deliver the vessel within a fixed period of time, the vessel is lost or damaged beyond repair, there are serious deficiencies in the vessel or prolonged off-hire, default under the contract; or

 

    the customer terminates the contract because the vessel has been subject to seizure for more than a specified number of days.

Navios Logistics could also become involved in legal disputes with customers, including but not limited to Navios

 

34


Table of Contents

Logistics’ long-term take-or pay customers, relating to its contracts, be it through litigation, arbitration or otherwise, which could lead to delays in, or suspension or termination of its take-or-pay contracts or others and result in time-consuming, disruptive and expensive litigation or arbitration. If such contracts are suspended for an extended period of time, or if a number of Navios Logistics’ material contracts are terminated or renegotiated, its financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected. Even if Navios Logistics prevail in legal disputes relating to its customer contracts, which could entitle it to compensation, Navios Logistics cannot assure you that it would receive such compensation on a timely basis or in an amount that would fully compensate Navios Logistics for its losses. For example, on March 30, 2016, Navios Logistics received written notice from Vale stating that Vale will not be performing the service contract entered into between Corporacion Navios S.A. and Vale on September 27, 2013, relating to the iron ore port facility in Nueva Palmira, Uruguay. The Company initiated arbitration proceedings in London on June 10, 2016 pursuant to the dispute resolution provisions of the service contract. On December 20, 2016, a London arbitration tribunal ruled that the Vale port contract remains in full force and effect. If Vale were to further repudiate or renounce the contract, Navios Logistics may elect to terminate the contract and then would be entitled to damages calculated by reference to guaranteed volumes and agreed tariffs for the remaining period of the contract.

Navios Logistics’ business can be affected by adverse weather conditions, effects of climate change and other factors beyond its control, that can affect production of the goods it transports and stores as well as the navigability of the river system on which it operates.

A significant portion of Navios Logistics’ business is derived from the transportation, handling and storage of iron ore, soybeans and other agricultural products produced in the Hidrovia region. Any drought or other adverse weather conditions, such as floods, could result in a decline in production of these products, which would likely result in a reduction in demand for its services. This would, in turn, negatively impact its results of operations and financial condition. Furthermore, Navios Logistics’ fleet operates in the Parana and Paraguay Rivers, and any changes adversely affecting navigability of either of these rivers, such as changes in the depth of the water or the width of the navigable channel, could, in the short-term, reduce or limit its ability to effectively transport cargo on the rivers. The possible effects of climate change, such as floods, droughts or increased storm activity, could similarly affect the demand for its services or its operations.

For instance, a prolonged drought, the possible effects of climate change, or other turn of events that is perceived by the market to have an impact on the region, the navigability of the Parana or Paraguay Rivers or Navios Logistics’ business in general may, in the short-term, result in a reduction in the market value of its ports, barges and pushboats that operate in the region. These barges and pushboats are designed to operate in wide and relatively calm rivers, of which there are only a few in the world. If it becomes difficult or impossible to operate profitably Navios Logistics’ barges and pushboats in the Hidrovia and Navios Logistics is forced to sell them to a third party located outside of the region, there is a limited market in which it would be able to sell these vessels, and accordingly it may be forced to sell them at a substantial loss.

Navios Logistics may be unable to obtain financing for its growth or to fund its future capital expenditures, which could materially adversely affect its results of operations and financial condition.

Navios Logistics’ capital expenditures during 2015, 2016 and 2017 were $27.0 million, $91.2 million and $46.5 million, respectively, used to acquire and/or pay installments for among others one bunker vessel, one newbuilding estuary tanker vessel, six pushboats, 72 newbuilding barges and to expand Navios Logistics’ port terminal operations through the construction of an iron ore port terminal facility. In order to follow its current strategy for growth, Navios Logistics will need to fund future asset or business acquisitions, increase working capital levels and increase capital expenditures.

In the future, Navios Logistics will also need to make capital expenditures required to maintain its current ports, fleet and infrastructure. Cash generated from its earnings may not be sufficient to fund all of these measures. Accordingly, Navios Logistics may need to raise capital through borrowings or the sale of debt or equity securities. Navios Logistics’ ability to obtain bank financing or to access the capital markets for future offerings may be limited by its financial condition at the time of any such financing or offering, as well as by adverse market conditions resulting from, among other things, general economic conditions and contingencies and uncertainties that are beyond its control. If Navios Logistics fails to obtain the funds necessary for capital expenditures required to maintain its ports, fleet and infrastructure, it may be forced to take vessels out of service or curtail operations, which could materially harm its revenues and profitability. If Navios Logistics fails to obtain the funds that might be necessary to acquire new vessels, expand its existing infrastructure, or increase its working capital or capital expenditures, Navios Logistics might not be able to grow its business and its earnings could suffer. Furthermore, despite covenants under the indenture governing the 2022 Logistics Senior Notes and Term Loan B Facility and the agreements governing its other indebtedness, Navios Logistics will be permitted to incur additional indebtedness, which would limit cash available for working capital, and to service its indebtedness.

 

35


Table of Contents

Spare parts or other key equipment needed for the operation of Navios Logistics’ ports and fleet may not be available off the shelf and, as a result, it may face substantial delays, which could result in loss of revenues while waiting for those spare parts to be produced and delivered to Navios Logistics.

Navios Logistics’ ports and its fleet may need spare parts to be provided in order to replace old or damaged parts in the normal course of its operations. Given the increased activity in the maritime industry and the industry that supplies it, the manufacturers of key equipment for Navios Logistics’ vessels and its ports (such as engine makers, propulsion systems makers, control system makers and others) may not have the spare parts needed available immediately (or off the shelf) and may have to produce them when required. If this was the case, Navios Logistics vessels and ports may be unable to operate while waiting for such spare parts to be produced, delivered, installed and tested, resulting in a substantial loss of revenues for Navios Logistics.

Navios Logistics owns and operates an up-river port terminal in San Antonio, Paraguay that it believes is well-positioned to become a hub for industrial development based upon the depth of the river in the area and the convergence between land and river transportation. If the port does not become a hub for industrial development, its future prospects could be materially and adversely affected.

Navios Logistics owns and operates an up-river port terminal with tank storage for refined petroleum products, oil and gas in San Antonio, Paraguay. Navios Logistics believes that the port’s location south of the city of Asuncion, the depth of the river in the area and the convergence between land and river transportation make this port well-positioned to become a hub for industrial development. However, if the location is not deemed to be advantageous, or the use of the river or its convergence with the land is not fully utilized for transportation, then the port would not become a hub for industrial development, and its future prospects could be materially and adversely affected.

The risks and costs associated with ports as well as vessels increase as the operational port equipment and vessels age.

The costs to operate and maintain a port or a vessel increase with the age of the port equipment or the vessel. Governmental regulations, safety or other equipment standards related to the age of the operational port equipment or vessels may require expenditures for alterations or the addition of new equipment to Navios Logistics’ port equipment or vessels and may restrict the type of activities in which these ports or vessels may engage. The failure to make capital expenditures to alter or add new equipment to Navios Logistics’ barges, pushboats or vessels may restrict the type of activities in which these barges, pushboats and vessels may engage and may decrease their operational efficiency and increase Navios Logistics’ costs. Given the increased activity in the maritime industry and the industry that supplies it, the manufacturers of key equipment for its vessels and ports (such as engine makers, propulsion systems makers, control systems makers and others) may not have the spare parts needed available immediately (or off-the-shelf) and may have to produce them when required. If this was the case, Navios Logistics’ vessels and ports may be unable to operate while waiting for such spare parts to be produced, delivered, installed and tested, resulting in substantial loss of revenues for Navios Logistics. As charterers prefer newer vessels that are more fuel efficient than older vessels, the age of some of Navios Logistics’ vessels, barges and pushboats may make them less attractive to charterers. Cargo insurance rates also increase with the age of a vessel, making older vessels less desirable to charterers as well.

Navios Logistics cannot assure you that, as its operational port equipment and vessels barges and pushboats age, market conditions will justify those expenditures or enable Navios Logistics to operate them profitably during the remainder of their useful lives. If Navios Logistics sells such assets, it may have to sell them at a loss, or opt to scrap its assets, and if clients no longer use its ports or charter-out its vessels due to their age, its results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

As Navios Logistics expands its business, it may have difficulty managing its growth, including the need to improve its operations and financial systems, staff and crew or to receive required approvals to implement its expansion projects. If Navios Logistics cannot improve these systems, recruit suitable employees or obtain required approvals, it may not be able to effectively control its operations.

Navios Logistics intends to grow its port terminal, barge and cabotage businesses, either through land acquisition and expansion of its port facilities, through purchases of additional vessels, through chartered-in vessels or acquisitions of other logistics and related or complementary businesses. The expansion and acquisition of new land or addition of vessels to its fleet will impose significant additional responsibilities on its management and staff, and may require Navios Logistics to increase the number of its personnel. Navios Logistics will also have to increase its customer base to provide continued activity for the new businesses.

In addition, approval of governmental, regulatory and other authorities may be needed to implement any acquisitions or expansions. For example, Navios Logistics has available land within the Nueva Palmira Free Zone in Uruguay as well as near the Free Zone where it plans to expand its port facility and construct a port terminal for liquid cargo. In order to complete these projects, however, Navios Logistics needs to receive required authorization from several authorities. If these authorities deny its request for authorization, or if existing authorizations are revoked, Navios Logistics will not be able to proceed with these projects.

 

36


Table of Contents

Growing any business by acquisition presents numerous risks. Acquisitions expose Navios Logistics to the risk of successor liability relating to actions involving an acquired company, its management or contingent liabilities incurred before the acquisition. The due diligence Navios Logistics conducts in connection with an acquisition, and any contractual guarantees or indemnities that it receives from the sellers of acquired companies or assets may not be sufficient to protect it from, or compensate it for, actual liabilities. Any material liability associated with an acquisition could adversely affect Navios Logistics’ reputation and results of operations and reduce the benefits of the acquisition. Other risks presented include difficulty in obtaining additional qualified personnel, managing relationships with customers and suppliers and integrating newly acquired assets or operations into existing infrastructures.

Management is unable to predict whether or when any prospective acquisition will occur, or the likelihood of a certain transaction being completed on favorable terms and conditions. Navios Logistics’ ability to expand its business through acquisitions depends on many factors, including its ability to identify acquisitions or access capital markets at an acceptable cost and negotiate favorable transaction terms. Navios Logistics cannot give any assurance that it will be successful in executing its growth plans or that it will not incur significant expenses and losses in connection therewith or that its acquisitions will perform as expected, which could materially adversely affect its results of operations and financial condition. Furthermore, because the volume of cargo Navios Logistics ships is at or near the capacity of its existing barges during the typical peak harvest season, its ability to increase volumes shipped is limited by its ability to acquire or charter-in additional barges.

With respect to Navios Logistics’ existing infrastructure, its initial operating and financial systems may not be adequate as Navios Logistics implements its plan to expand, and its attempts to improve these systems may be ineffective. If Navios Logistics is unable to operate its financial and operations systems effectively or to recruit suitable employees as it expands its operations, it may be unable to effectively control and manage the substantially larger operation. Although it is impossible to predict what errors might occur as the result of inadequate controls, it is generally harder to manage a larger operation than a smaller one and, accordingly, more likely that errors will occur as operations grow. Additional management infrastructure and systems will be required in connection with such growth to attempt to avoid such errors.

Rising crew costs, fuel prices and other cost increases may adversely affect Navios Logistics’ profits.

At December 31, 2017, Navios Logistics employed 395 land-based employees and 597 seafarers as crew on its vessels. Crew costs are a significant expense for Navios Logistics. Recently, the limited supply of and increased demand for well-qualified crew, due to the increase in the size of the global shipping fleet, has created upward pressure on crewing costs, which Navios Logistics generally bears under its time and spot contracts. Additionally, labor union activity in the Hidrovia may create pressure for Navios Logistics to pay higher crew salaries and wages. In addition, fuel is one of the largest operating expenses in Navios Logistics’ barge and cabotage businesses, when the revenue is contracted mainly by ton per cargo shipped. The prices for and availability of fuel may be subject to rapid change or curtailment, respectively, due to, among other things, new laws or regulations, interruptions in production by suppliers, imposition of restrictions on energy supply by government, worldwide price levels and market conditions. Currently, most of Navios Logistics’ long-term contracts provide for the adjustment of freight rates based on changes in the fuel prices and crew costs. Navios Logistics may be unable to include similar provisions in these contracts when they are renewed or in future contracts with new customers. To the extent Navios Logistics’ contracts do not pass-through changes in fuel prices to its clients, Navios Logistics will be forced to bear the cost of fuel price increases. Navios Logistics may hedge in the futures market all or part of its exposure to fuel price variations. Navios Logistics cannot assure you that it will be successful in hedging its exposure. In the event of a default by Navios Logistics’ contractual counterparties or other circumstance affecting their performance under a contract, Navios Logistics may be subject to exposure under, and may incur losses in connection with, its hedging instruments, if any. In certain jurisdictions, the price of fuel is affected by high local taxes and may become more expensive than prevailing international prices. Navios Logistics may not be able to pass onto its customers the additional cost of such taxes and may suffer losses as a consequence of such inability. Such increases in crew and fuel costs may materially adversely affect Navios Logistics’ results of operations.

Navios Logistics’ industry is highly competitive, and it may not be able to compete successfully for services with new companies with greater resources.

Navios Logistics provides services through its ports and employs its fleet in highly competitive markets. The river and sea coastal logistics market is international in scope and Navios Logistics competes with many different companies, including other port or vessel owners and major oil companies.

With respect to loading, storage and ancillary services, the market is divided between transits and exports, depending on the cargo origin. In the case of transits there are other companies operating in the river system that are able to offer services similar to Navios Logistics. With respect to exports, its competitors are Montevideo Port in Montevideo and Ontur and TGU in Nueva Palmira. The main competitor of its liquid port terminal in Paraguay is Petropar, a Paraguayan state-owned entity. Other competitors include Copetrol, TLP, Petrobras and Trafigura Pte Ltd.

 

37


Table of Contents

Navios Logistics faces competition in its barge and cabotage businesses with transportation of oil and refined petroleum products from other independent ship owners and from vessel operators. The charter markets in which its vessels compete are highly competitive. Key competitors include the successor of Ultrapetrol Bahamas Ltd., Hidrovias do Brasil, Interbarge, P&O, Imperial Shipping and Fluviomar. In addition, some of its customers, including ADM, International S.A. (“Cargill”), Louis Dreyfus Holding B.V. (“Louis Dreyfus”) and Vale, have some of their own dedicated barge capacity, which they can use to transport cargo in lieu of hiring a third party. Navios Logistics also competes indirectly with other forms of land-based transportation such as truck and rail. These companies and other smaller entities are regular competitors of Navios Logistics in its primary trading areas. Competition is primarily based on prevailing market contract rates, vessel location and vessel manager know-how, reputation and credibility.

Navios Logistics’ competitors may be able to offer their customers lower prices, higher quality service and greater name recognition than Navios Logistics does. Accordingly, Navios Logistics may be unable to retain its current customers or to attract new customers.

If Navios Logistics fails to fulfill the oil majors’ vetting processes, it could materially adversely affect the employment of its tanker vessels in the spot and period markets, and consequently its results of operations.

While numerous factors are considered and evaluated prior to a commercial decision, the oil majors, through their association, OCIMF, have developed and are implementing two basic tools: (a) the Ship Inspection Report Program (“SIRE”) and (b) the Tanker Management and Self Assessment (“TMSA”) program. The former is a ship inspection based upon a thorough Vessel Inspection Questionnaire and performed by OCIMF-accredited inspectors, resulting in a report being logged on SIRE. The report is an important element of the ship evaluation undertaken by any oil major when a commercial need exists.

Based upon commercial needs, there are three levels of assessment used by the oil majors: (a) terminal use, which will clear a vessel to call at one of the oil major’s terminals, (b) voyage charter, which will clear the vessel for a single voyage and (c) term charter, which will clear the vessel for use for an extended period of time. While for terminal use and voyage charter relationships, a ship inspection and the operator’s TMSA will be sufficient for the evaluation to be undertaken, a term charter relationship also requires a thorough office audit. An operator’s request for such an audit is by no means a guarantee one will be performed; it will take a long record of proven excellent safety and environmental protection on the operator’s part as well as high commercial interest on the part of the oil major to have an office audit performed. If Navios Logistics fails to clear the vetting processes of the oil majors, it could have a material adverse effect on the employment of our vessels, and, consequently, on its results of operations.

Navios Logistics may employ its fleet on the spot market and thus expose itself to risk of losses based on short-term decreases in shipping rates.

Navios Logistics periodically employs some of its fleet on a spot basis. As of December 31, 2017, 58% of its cabotage fleet and 34% of its barge fleet on a dwt tons basis was employed under time charter or COA contracts. The remaining percentage of its barge fleet and cabotage fleet were employed in the spot market. The spot charter market can be competitive and freight rates within this market may be volatile with the timing and amount of fluctuations in spot rates being difficult to determine. Longer-term contracts provide income at pre-determined rates over more extended periods of time. The cycles in its target markets have not yet been clearly determined but Navios Logistics expects them to exhibit significant volatility as the South American markets mature. Navios Logistics cannot assure you that it will be successful in keeping its fleet fully employed in these short-term markets, or that future spot rates will be sufficient to enable such fleet to be operated profitably, as spot rates may decline below the operating cost of vessels. A significant decrease in spot market rates or its inability to fully employ its fleet by taking advantage of the spot market would result in a reduction of the incremental revenue received from spot chartering and could materially adversely affect its results of operations, and operating cash flow.

Navios Logistics does not carry any strike insurance of its vessels. As a result, if Navios Logistics were to become subject to a labor strike, it may incur uninsured losses, which could have a material adverse effect on its results of operations.

Navios Logistics does not currently maintain any strike insurance for its vessels. As a result, if the crew of its vessels were to initiate a labor strike, Navios Logistics could incur uninsured liabilities and losses as a result. There can be no guarantee that Navios Logistics will be able to obtain additional insurance coverage in the future, and even if Navios Logistics is able to obtain additional coverage, it may not carry sufficient insurance coverage to satisfy potential claims. Should uninsured losses occur, it could have a material adverse effect on its results of operations.

 

38


Table of Contents

Certain of Navios Logistics’ directors, officers, and principal stockholders are affiliated with entities engaged in business activities similar to those conducted by Navios Logistics which may compete directly with it, causing such persons to have conflicts of interest.

Some of Navios Logistics’ directors, officers and principal stockholders have affiliations with entities that have similar business activities to those conducted by Navios Logistics. In addition, certain of Navios Logistics’ directors are also directors of shipping companies and they may enter similar businesses in the future. These other affiliations and business activities may give rise to certain conflicts of interest in the course of such individuals’ affiliation with Navios Logistics. Although Navios Logistics does not prevent its directors, officers and principal stockholders from having such affiliations, Navios Logistics uses its best efforts to cause such individuals to comply with all applicable laws and regulations in addressing such conflicts of interest. Navios Logistics’ officers and employee directors devote their full time and attention to its ongoing operations, and its non-employee directors devote such time as is necessary and required to satisfy their duties as directors of a company.

Navios Logistics’ success depends upon its management team and other employees, and if it is unable to attract and retain key management personnel and other employees, its results of operations may be negatively impacted.

Navios Logistics’ success depends to a significant extent upon the abilities and efforts of its management team and its ability to retain them. In particular, many members of its senior management team, including its Chairman, its Chief Executive Officer, its Chief Financial Officer, its Chief Operating Officers and its Chief Commercial Officer, have extensive experience in the logistics and shipping industries. If Navios Logistics was to lose their services for any reason, it is not clear whether any available replacements would be able to manage its operations as effectively. The loss of any of the members of its management team could impair Navios Logistics’ ability to identify and secure vessel contracts, to maintain good customer relations and to otherwise manage its business, which could have a material adverse effect on its financial performance and its ability to compete. Navios Logistics does not maintain key man insurance on any of its officers. Further, the efficient and safe operation of its fleet and ports requires skilled and experienced crew members and employees. Difficulty in hiring and retaining such crew members and employees could adversely affect its results of operations.

Risks Relating to Argentina

Argentine government actions concerning the economy, including decisions with respect to inflation, interest rates, price controls, foreign exchange controls, wages and taxes, restrictions on production, imports and exports, have had and could continue to have a material adverse effect on Navios Logistics. Navios Logistics cannot provide any assurance that future economic, social and political developments in Argentina, over which it has no control, will not impair its business, financial condition or results of operations, the guarantees or the market price of the 2022 Logistics Senior Notes.

The future economic and political environment of Argentina is uncertain.

The administration that took office in Argentina on December 10, 2015 has announced and implemented several significant economic and policy reforms, including reforms to the foreign exchange market in order to provide greater flexibility and easier access to the foreign exchange market. Likewise, export duties on several agricultural products and export duties on most industrial and mining exports were eliminated.

We can offer no assurances as to the policies that may be implemented by the new Argentine administration, or that political developments or social unrest in Argentina will not adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

The continuing inflation may have material adverse effects on the Argentine economy.

In the past, Argentina has experienced periods of high inflation. Inflation has increased since 2005 and remained relatively high for more than a decade. The reliability of INDEC’s statistics has been widely questioned. In February 2013, the IMF censured Argentina for its inaccurate financial statistics. In response, in 2014, INDEC adopted the IPCNu, an improved methodology for calculating the CPI, and estimated the 2014 CPI to be 23.9%.

However, the current administration as one of its first measures declared a state of administrative emergency, suspending momentarily the publication of all indexes until the INDEC is capable of accurately calculating such indexes. During this suspension period, the inflation rate was informed through data provided by the City of Buenos Aires and the province of San Luis.

On July 15, 2016, INDEC published its inflation index again, indicating that the CPI showed, for June, July, August, September, October, November and December of 2016, variations of 3.1%, 2%, 0.2%, 1.1%, 2.4%, 1.6% and 1.2% compared to previous month, respectively. Furthermore, according to the most recent publicly available information, the inflation rate was 24.8% for the year 2017.

 

39


Table of Contents

On the other hand, INDEC published the index of poverty and indigence, which estimated that poverty reaches 28.6% of Argentines and indigence, 6.2% during the first semester of 2017.

As a result of the readjustment of INDEC indexes, the IMF Executive Board announced, on November 9, 2016, the lifting of the censorship imposed on Argentina in 2013 due to lack of consistency in its statistical data.

Over the last few years, the Argentine government has implemented certain programs aimed at controlling inflation and monitoring the prices of many goods and services, including price agreements between the Argentine government and private sector companies.

The increase in wages and public spending, the adjustment of some utility tariffs and the expiration of the price agreements signed by the Argentine government could have a direct influence on inflation. In the past, inflation undermined the Argentine economy substantially, as well as the ability of the Argentine government to create conditions leading to growth. In turn, because part of the Argentine debt is adjusted by the Reference Stabilization Coefficient (“CER”), strongly related to inflation, its increase would have a negative effect on the level of public indebtedness.

A high inflation economy could undermine Argentina’s cost competitiveness abroad if not offset by a devaluation of the Argentine peso, which could also negatively affect economic activity and employment levels. While most of the client contracts of Navios Logistics’ Argentine subsidiaries are denominated in U.S. dollars, freight under those contracts is collected in Argentine pesos at the prevailing exchange rate. These contracts also include crew cost adjustment terms. Uncertainty about future inflation may contribute to slowdown or contraction in economic growth. Argentine inflation rate volatility makes it impossible to estimate with reasonable certainty the extent to which activity levels and results of operations of Navios Logistics’ Argentine subsidiaries could be affected by inflation and exchange rate volatility in the future.

The Argentine Central Bank has imposed restrictions on the transfer of funds outside of Argentina and other exchange controls in the past and may do so in the future, which could prevent Navios Logistics’ Argentine subsidiaries from transferring funds for the payment of the 2022 Logistics Senior Notes or the related guarantees.

In 2001 and during the first half of 2002, Argentina experienced a massive withdrawal of deposits from the Argentine financial system in a short period of time, which precipitated a liquidity crisis within the Argentine financial system, which prompted the Argentine government to impose exchange controls and restrictions on the ability of depositors to withdraw their deposits. Despite the reduction on some of these restrictions in the following years, significant government controls and restrictions remained in place.

In December 2015, the Argentine government implemented several reforms to the foreign exchange market regulations and provided easier access to the foreign exchange market for individuals and companies. Consequently, as from December 17, 2015, the new financial indebtedness transactions abroad of the non-financial private sector, financial sector and local governments will not be subject to the obligation to bring to and liquidate funds in the MULC (the single and free floating foreign exchange market). Fund liquidation at MULC (the single and free floating foreign exchange market) will be a condition precedent for the further access to that market so as to cater for capital and interest services. If the funding enters local accounts in foreign currency in the country, the liquidation of the funds deposited will need to be evidenced.

Additionally, pursuant to recent regulations, financial indebtedness taken through the MULC and financial debt rollovers with non-residents in the financial sector and non-financial private sector will not need to meet a minimum period of stay, and may be canceled at any time.

Some remaining controls and restrictions, and any additional restrictions of this kind that may be imposed in the future, could impair Navios Logistics ability to transfer funds generated by its Argentine operations in U.S. dollars outside Argentina to it for the payment of its indebtedness. In addition, any other restrictions or requirements, that may be imposed in the future, expose Navios Logistics to the risk of losses arising from fluctuations in the exchange rate of the Argentine peso.

The Argentine government has made certain changes to its tax rules that affected Navios Logistics’ operations in Argentina in the past, and could further increase the fiscal burden on its operations in Argentina in the future.

Since 1992, the Argentine government has not permitted the application of an inflation adjustment on the value of fixed assets for tax purposes. Since the substantial devaluation of the Argentine peso in 2002, the amounts that the Argentine tax authorities permit Navios Logistics to deduct as depreciation for its past investments in plant, property and equipment have been substantially reduced, resulting in a higher effective income tax charge.

However, in December 2016, a reform to the Income Tax Law was passed by the National Congress. Some of the main modifications were: (i) personal deductions were raised; (ii) a new scale of aliquots was established, including a greater number of tranches and beginning taxing with a 5% aliquot; (iii) new deductions were established for per diem and room rent; (iv) extra amounts

 

40


Table of Contents

paid to employees in the form of overtime for services on national holidays, non-business days and weekends is exempt from income tax; and (v) the updating of the Average Taxable Compensation for Government Employees (RIPTE) was established as of fiscal year 2018, with respect to personal deduction amounts and tax tranches. In order to finance the reduction of tax resources that these reforms will entail, an indirect tax on on-line betting and an extraordinary tax on US dollar futures transactions were created; in addition, the figure of the surrogate decision-maker in Value Tax Added in relation to operations involving external subjects was established.

If the Argentine government decides to alter the tax burden on Navios Logistics’ operations in Argentina, its results of operations and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.

The Argentine economy could be adversely affected by economic developments in other global markets.

Argentina’s economy is vulnerable to external shocks that could be caused by adverse developments affecting its principal trading partners. A significant decline in the economic growth of any of Argentina’s major trading partners (including Brazil, the EU, China and the U.S.) could have a material adverse impact on Argentina’s balance of trade and could adversely affect Argentina’s economic growth. In particular, Brazil’s economy, which is Argentina’s largest export market and its principal source of imports, is currently experiencing heightened negative pressure due to the uncertainties stemming from ongoing political crises, including the corruption investigations and allegations and criminal convictions involving certain politicians. The Brazilian economy declined by 3.6% during 2016. In addition, the Brazilian currency lost approximately 17.7% of its value relative to the U.S. dollar in 2016. Brazilian demand for Argentine exports has generally declined over the past five years and further deterioration of economic conditions in Brazil may increasingly reduce demand for Argentine exports and create advantages for Brazilian imports. Further adverse developments in the Brazilian political and economic crisis may have further negative effects on the Argentine economy and our operations.

Argentina may also be affected by other countries that have influence over world economic cycles. If interest rates rise significantly in developed economies, including the U.S., emerging market economies, including Argentina, could find it increasingly challenging and expensive to borrow capital and refinance existing debt, which could negatively affect their economic growth.

Future policies of the Argentine government may affect the economy as well as Navios Logistics’ operations.

During past years, the Argentine government took several actions to re-nationalize concessions and public services companies that were privatized in the 1990’s, such as Aguas Argentinas S.A. and Aerolíneas Argentinas S.A. On May 3, 2012, expropriation law 26,741 was passed by the Argentine Congress, providing for the expropriation of 51% of the share capital of YPF S.A., represented by an identical stake of Class D shares owned, directly or indirectly, by Repsol YPF and its controlled or controlling entities, which have been declared of public interest. The Argentine government made an offer to compensate Repsol YPF for around $5.0 billion, which was accepted by the Board of Directors and shareholders of Repsol YPF and confirmed by the Argentine Congress. Although the current administration has not implemented or advocated any nationalization or expropriation measures, similar measures, such as mandatory renegotiation or modification of existing contracts, new taxation policies, changes in laws, regulations and policies affecting foreign trade, investment, among others, that may be adopted by the Argentine government in the future could adversely affect Navios Logistics’ business, financial condition and results of operations.

Risks Relating to Uruguayan Free Zone Regulation

Certain of Navios Logistics’ subsidiaries in Uruguay are operating as direct free trade zone users under an agreement with the Free Zone Division of the Uruguayan General Directorate of Commerce allowing them to operate in isolated public and private areas within national borders and to enjoy tax exemptions and other benefits, such as a generic exemption on present and future national taxes including the Corporate Income Tax, Value-Added Tax and Wealth Tax. Other benefits that Navios Logistics’ subsidiaries enjoy are simplified corporate law provisions, the ability to negotiate preferential public utility rates with government agencies and government guarantees of maintenance of such benefits and tax exemptions. Free trade zone users do not need to pay import and export tariffs to introduce goods from abroad to the free trade zone, to transfer or send such goods to other free trade zones in Uruguay or send them abroad. However, Navios Logistics’ subsidiaries may lose all the tax benefits granted to them if they breach or fail to comply with the free trade zone contracts or framework, including exceeding the limit on non-Uruguayan employees or engaging in industrial, commercial or service activities outside of a free trade zone in Uruguay. In this case, Navios Logistics’ subsidiaries may continue with their operations from the free zone, but under a different tax regime.

 

41


Table of Contents

Other Risks Relating to the Countries in which Navios Logistics’ Operates

Navios Logistics is an international company that is exposed to the risks of doing business in many different, and often less developed and emerging market countries.

Navios Logistics is an international company and conducts all of its operations outside of the U.S., and expects to continue doing so for the foreseeable future. These operations are performed in countries that are historically less developed and stable than the U.S., such as Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay.

Some of the other risks Navios Logistics is generally exposed to through its operations in emerging markets include among others:

 

    political and economic instability, changing economic policies and conditions, and war and civil disturbances;

 

    recessions in economies of countries in which Navios Logistics has business operations;

 

    frequent government interventions into the country’s economy, including changes to monetary, fiscal and credit policy;

 

    the imposition of additional withholding, income or other taxes, or tariffs or other restrictions on foreign trade or investment, including currency exchange controls and currency repatriation limitations;

 

    the modification of Navios Logistics’ status or the rules and regulations relating to the international tax-free trade zone in which it operates its dry port;

 

    the imposition of executive and judicial decisions upon Navios Logistics’ vessels by the different governmental authorities associated with some of these countries;

 

    the imposition of or unexpected adverse changes in foreign laws or regulatory requirements;

 

    longer payment cycles in foreign countries and difficulties in collecting accounts receivable;

 

    difficulties and costs of staffing and managing its foreign operations;

 

    compliance with anti-bribery laws; and

 

    acts of terrorism.

These risks may result in unforeseen harm to Navios Logistics’ business and financial condition. Also, some of its customers are headquartered in South America, and a general decline in the economies of South America, or the instability of certain South American countries and economies, could materially adversely affect Navios Logistics.

Navios Logistics’ business in emerging markets requires it to respond to rapid changes in market conditions in these countries. Navios Logistics’ overall success in international markets depends, in part, upon its ability to succeed in different legal, regulatory, economic, social and political conditions. Navios Logistics may not continue to succeed in developing and implementing policies and strategies that will be effective in each location where it does business. Furthermore, the occurrence of any of the foregoing factors may have a material adverse effect on its business and results of operations.

The governments of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay have entered into a treaty that commits each of them to participate in a regional initiative to integrate the region’s economies. There is no guarantee that such an initiative will be successful or that each of the governments involved in the initiative will follow through on its intentions to participate and if such regional initiative is unsuccessful, it could have a material adverse impact on Navios Logistics’ results of operations.

The governments of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay have entered into a treaty that commits each of them to participate in a regional initiative to integrate the region’s economies, a central component of which is water transportation in the Hidrovia. Although Navios Logistics believes that this regional initiative of expanding navigation on the Hidrovia river system will result in significant economic benefits, there is no guarantee that such an initiative will ultimately be successful, that each country will follow through on its intention to participate, or that the benefits of this initiative will match Navios Logistics’ expectations of continuing growth in the Hidrovia or reducing transportation costs. If the regional initiative is unsuccessful, Navios Logistics’ results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

 

42


Table of Contents

Changes in rules and regulations with respect to cabotage or their interpretation in the markets in which Navios Logistics’ operate could have a material adverse effect on its results of operations.

In the markets in which Navios Logistics currently operates, in cabotage or regional trades, it is subject to restrictive rules and regulations on a region by region basis. Its operations currently benefit from these rules and regulations or their interpretation. For instance, preferential treatment is extended in Argentine cabotage for Argentine flagged vessels or foreign flagged vessels operated by local established operators with sufficient Argentine tonnage under one to three years’ licenses, including its Argentine cabotage vessels. Changes in cabotage rules and regulations or in their interpretation may have an adverse effect on Navios Logistics’ current or future cabotage operations, either by becoming more restrictive (which could result in limitations to the utilization of some of its vessels in those trades) or less restrictive (which could result in increased competition in these markets).

Because Navios Logistics generates the majority of its revenues in U.S. dollars but incurs a significant portion of its expenses in other currencies, exchange rate fluctuations could cause it to suffer exchange rate losses, thereby increasing expenses and reducing income.

Navios Logistics engages in regional commerce with a variety of entities. Although its operations expose Navios Logistics to certain levels of foreign currency risk, its revenues are predominantly U.S. dollar-denominated at the present. Additionally, Navios Logistics’ South American subsidiaries transact certain operations in Uruguayan pesos, Paraguayan guaranies, Argentinean pesos and Brazilian reals; however, all of the subsidiaries’ primary cash flows are U.S. dollar-denominated. Currencies in Argentina and Brazil have fluctuated significantly against the U.S. dollar in the past. As of December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015 approximately 60.3%, 61.1% and 61.9%, respectively, of its expenses were incurred in currencies other than U.S. dollars. Transactions in currencies other than the functional currency are translated at the exchange rate in effect at the date of each transaction. Expenses incurred in foreign currencies against which the U.S. dollar falls in value can increase, thereby decreasing Navios Logistics’ income. A greater percentage of Navios Logistics’ transactions and expenses in the future may be denominated in currencies other than U.S. dollars. As part of its overall risk management policy, Navios Logistics may attempt to hedge these risks in exchange rate fluctuations from time to time but cannot guarantee it will be successful in these hedging activities. Future fluctuations in the value of local currencies relative to the U.S. dollar in the countries in which it operates may occur, and if such fluctuations were to occur in one or a combination of the countries in which it operates, its results of operations or financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

Tax Risks

We may earn U.S. source income that is subject to tax, thereby adversely affecting our results of operations and cash flows.

Under the Code, 50.0% of the gross shipping income of a vessel owning or chartering corporation that is attributable to transportation that either begins or ends, but that does not both begin and end, in the U.S. is characterized as U.S.-source shipping income. U.S.-source shipping income generally is subject to a 4.0% U.S. federal income tax without allowance for deduction or, if such U.S.-source shipping income is effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business in the U.S., U.S. federal corporate income tax (the highest statutory rate presently is 21.0%) as well as a branch profits tax (presently imposed at a 30.0% rate on effectively connected earnings), unless that corporation qualifies for exemption from tax under Section 883 of the Code. We believe that we and each of our subsidiaries qualifies and will continue to qualify for the foreseeable future for this statutory tax exemption under Section 883 with respect to our U.S.-source shipping income, provided that our common stock continues to be listed on the NYSE and represents more than 50.0% of the total combined voting power of all classes of our stock entitled to vote and of the total value of our stock, and less than 50.0% of our common stock is owned, actually or constructively under specified stock attribution rules, on more than half the number of days in the relevant year by persons who each own 5.0% or more of the vote and value of our common stock. Our ability to qualify for the exemption at any given time will depend upon circumstances related to the ownership of our common stock at such time and thus are beyond our control. Furthermore, our board of directors could determine that it is in our best interests to take an action that would result in this tax exemption not applying to us in the future. Accordingly, we can give no assurance that we would qualify for the exemption under Section 883 with respect to any such income we earn. If we were not entitled to the Section 883 exemption for any taxable year, we generally would be subject to a 4.0% U.S. federal gross income tax with respect to our U.S.-source shipping income or, if such U.S. source shipping income were effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business in the U.S., U.S. federal corporate income tax as well as a branch profits tax for those years. As a result, depending on the trading patterns of our vessels, we could become liable for tax, and our net income and cash flow could be adversely affected. Please see the discussion under “Taxation—Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations—U.S. Federal Income Taxation of the Company—Taxation of Our Shipping Income.”

 

43


Table of Contents

Navios Holdings may be taxed as a U.S. corporation.

The purchase by International Shipping Enterprises Inc. (“ISE”), our predecessor, of all of the outstanding shares of common stock of Navios Holdings, and the subsequent downstream merger of ISE with and into Navios Holdings took place on August 25, 2005. Navios Holdings is incorporated under the laws of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. ISE received an opinion from its counsel for the merger transaction that, while there is no direct authority that governs the tax treatment of the transaction, it was more likely than not that Navios Holdings would be taxed by the U.S. as a foreign corporation. Accordingly, we take the position that Navios Holdings will be taxed as a foreign corporation by the U.S.. If Navios Holdings were to be taxed as a U.S. corporation, its taxes would be significantly higher than they are currently.

A change in tax laws, treaties or regulations, or their interpretation, of any country in which we operate our business could result in a high tax rate on our worldwide earnings, which could result in a significant negative impact on our earnings and cash flows from operations.

We are an international company that conducts business throughout the world. Tax laws and regulations are highly complex and subject to interpretation. Consequently, we are subject to changing tax laws, treaties and regulations in and between countries in which we operate. Our income tax expense is based upon our interpretation of tax laws in effect in various countries at the time that the expense was incurred. A change in these tax laws, treaties or regulations, or in the interpretation thereof, or in the valuation of our deferred tax assets, could result in a materially higher tax expense or a higher effective tax rate on our worldwide earnings, and such change could be significant to our financial results. If any tax authority successfully challenges our operational structure, intercompany pricing policies or the taxable presence of our key subsidiaries in certain countries, or if the terms of certain income tax treaties are interpreted in a manner that is adverse to our structure, or if we lose a material tax dispute in any country, our effective tax rate on our worldwide earnings from our operations could increase substantially and our earnings and cash flows from these operations could be materially adversely affected. For example, in accordance with the currently applicable Greek law, foreign flagged vessels that are managed by Greek or foreign ship management companies having established an office in Greece are subject to duties towards the Greek state, which are calculated on the basis of the relevant vessel’s tonnage. The payment of said duties exhausts the tax liability of the foreign ship owning company and the relevant manager against any tax, duty, charge or contribution payable on income from the exploitation of the foreign flagged vessel.

We and our subsidiaries may be subject to taxation in the jurisdictions in which we and our subsidiaries conduct business. Such taxation would result in decreased earnings available to our stockholders.

Investors are encouraged to consult their own tax advisors concerning the overall tax consequences of the ownership of our common stock arising in an investor’s particular situation under U.S. federal, state, local and foreign law.

U.S. tax authorities could treat us as a “passive foreign investment company,” which could have adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences to U.S. holders.

A foreign corporation will be treated as a PFIC, for U.S. federal income tax purposes if either (1) at least 75% of its gross income for any taxable year consists of certain types of “passive income” or (2) at least 50% of the quarterly average value of the corporation’s assets produce or are held for the production of those types of “passive income.” For purposes of these tests, “passive income” includes dividends, interest, capital gains and rents (other than rents derived other than in the active conduct of a rental business). For purposes of these tests, income derived from the performance of services does not constitute “passive income.” U.S. stockholders of a PFIC are subject to a disadvantageous U.S. federal income tax regime with respect to the income derived by the PFIC, the distributions they receive from the PFIC and the gain, if any, they derive from the sale or other disposition of their shares in the PFIC and additional tax filing obligations.

Based upon our actual and projected income, assets and activities, we believe that we should not be a PFIC for our taxable year ended December 31, 2017 or for subsequent taxable years. Based upon our operations as described herein, our income from time charters should not be treated as passive income for purposes of determining whether we are a PFIC. Accordingly, our income from our time chartering activities should not constitute “passive income,” and the assets that we own and operate in connection with the production of that income should not constitute passive assets.

There is substantial legal authority supporting this position consisting of case law and U.S. Internal Revenue Service, or IRS, pronouncements concerning the characterization of income derived from time charters and voyage charters as services income for other tax purposes. However, it should be noted that there is also authority, which characterizes time charter income as rental income rather than services income for other tax purposes. Accordingly, no assurance can be given that the IRS or a court of law will accept this position and there is a risk that the IRS or a court of law could determine that we are a PFIC. In addition, no assurance can be given as to our current and future PFIC status, because such status requires an annual factual determination based upon the composition of our income and assets for the entire taxable year. The PFIC determination also depends on the application of complex U.S. federal income tax rules concerning the classification of our income and assets for this purpose, and there are legal uncertainties involved in determining

 

44


Table of Contents

whether the income derived from our chartering activities and from our logistics activities constitutes rental income or income derived from the performance of services. We have not sought, and we do not expect to seek, an IRS ruling on this issue. As a result, the IRS or a court could disagree with our position. In addition, although we intend to conduct our affairs in a manner to avoid, to the extent possible, being classified as a PFIC with respect to any taxable year, we cannot assure you that the nature of our operations, or the nature or composition of our income or assets, will not change in the future, or that we can avoid PFIC status in the future.

If the IRS were to find that we are or have been a PFIC for any taxable year, our U.S. stockholders would face adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences and certain information reporting requirements. Under the PFIC rules, unless those stockholders make an election available under the Code (which election could itself have adverse consequences for such stockholders, and which election may not be available if our common stock were to cease to be listed on the NYSE), such stockholders would be liable to pay U.S. federal income tax at the then prevailing ordinary income tax rates, plus interest, upon excess distributions and upon any gain from the disposition of their shares of common stock, as if the excess distribution or gain had been recognized ratably over the stockholder’s holding period of the common stock. In addition, for each year during which we are treated as a PFIC and you actually or constructively own our common stock you generally will be required to file IRS Form 8621 with your U.S. federal income tax return to report certain information concerning your ownership of our common stock. Please see the discussion under “Taxation—Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations — Taxation of U.S. Holders of our Common Stock — Passive Foreign Investment Company Status.”

Item 4. Information on the Company

A. History and Development of the Company

The legal and commercial name of the Company is Navios Maritime Holdings Inc. The Company’s office and principal place of business is located at 7 Avenue de Grande Bretagne, Office 11B2, Monte Carlo, MC 98000 Monaco, and its telephone number is (011) + (377) 9798-2140. The Company is a corporation incorporated under the BCA and the laws of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Trust Company of the Marshall Islands, Inc. serves as the Company’s agent for service of process, and the Company’s registered address, as well as address of its agent for service of process, is Trust Company Complex, Ajeltake Island P.O. Box 1405, Majuro, Marshall Islands MH96960.

On August 25, 2005, pursuant to a Stock Purchase Agreement dated February 28, 2005, as amended, by and among ISE, Navios Holdings, and all the shareholders of Navios Holdings, ISE acquired Navios Holdings through the purchase of all of the outstanding shares of common stock of Navios Holdings. As a result of this acquisition, Navios Holdings became a wholly-owned subsidiary of ISE. In addition, on August 25, 2005, simultaneously with the acquisition of Navios Holdings, ISE effected a reincorporation from the State of Delaware to the Republic of the Marshall Islands through a downstream merger with and into its newly acquired wholly-owned subsidiary, whose name was and continued to be Navios Maritime Holdings Inc.

The Company operates a fleet of owned Capesize, Panamax, Ultra Handymax and Handysize vessels and a fleet of time chartered Capesize, Panamax, Ultra Handymax and Handysize vessels that are employed to provide worldwide transportation of bulk commodities. Navios Holdings is a global, vertically integrated seaborne shipping and logistics company focused on the transport and transshipment of dry bulk commodities including iron ore, coal and grain. For over 60 years, Navios Holdings has had in-house technical ship management expertise that has worked with producers of raw materials, agricultural traders and exporters, industrial end-users, ship owners and charterers.

Navios Logistics

Navios Logistics is one of the largest logistics companies in the Hidrovia region of South America, focusing on the Hidrovia river system, the main navigable river system in the region, and on cabotage trades along the eastern coast of South America. Navios Logistics is focused on providing its customers integrated transportation, storage and related services through its port facilities, its large, versatile fleet of dry and liquid cargo barges and its product tankers. Navios Logistics serves the needs of a number of growing South American industries, including mineral and grain commodity providers as well as users of refined petroleum products.

On January 1, 2008, pursuant to a share purchase agreement, Navios Holdings contributed cash, and the authorized capital stock of its wholly-owned subsidiary Corporacion Navios Sociedad Anonima (“CNSA”) in exchange for the issuance and delivery of 63.8% of Navios Logistics’ outstanding stock. Navios Logistics acquired all ownership interests in the Horamar Group (“Horamar”) in exchange for cash, and the issuance of 36.2% of Navios Logistics’ outstanding stock. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Holdings owned 63.8% of Navios Logistics.

 

45


Table of Contents

Affiliates (not consolidated under Navios Holdings)

Navios Partners

Navios Partners (NYSE:NMM) is an international owner and operator of dry cargo vessels and is engaged in the seaborne transportation services of a wide range of dry cargo commodities including iron ore, coal, grain, fertilizer and also containers, chartering its vessels under medium to long-term charters.

On August 7, 2007, Navios Holdings formed Navios Partners under the laws of Marshall Islands. Navios GP L.L.C., or the general partner, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Navios Holdings, was also formed on that date to act as the general partner of Navios Partners and received a 2.0% general partner interest in Navios Partners.

On or prior to the closing of Navios Partners’ initial public offering, or IPO, in November 2007, Navios Holdings entered into certain agreements with Navios Partners: (a) a management agreement with Navios Partners pursuant to which Navios Shipmanagement Inc. (the “Manager”) , a wholly-owned subsidiary of Navios Holdings, provides Navios Partners with commercial and technical management services; (b) an administrative services agreement with the Manager pursuant to which the Manager provides Navios Partners administrative services; and (c) an omnibus agreement with Navios Partners, governing, among other things, when Navios Partners and Navios Holdings may compete against each other as well as rights of first offer on certain dry bulk carriers.

Since the formation of Navios Partners, Navios Holdings sold in total ten vessels to Navios Partners (the Navios Hope, the Navios Apollon, the Navios Hyperion, the Navios Aurora II, the Navios Fulvia, the Navios Melodia, the Navios Pollux, the Navios Luz, the Navios Orbiter and the Navios Buena Ventura) and also sold the rights of Navios Sagittarius to Navios Partners. All vessels were sold in exchange of cash and 5,601,920 common units of Navios Partners in total.

As of December 31, 2017, Navios Holdings’ interest in Navios Partners was 20.8% (including 2.0% general partner interest).

Navios Acquisition

Navios Acquisition (NYSE:NNA) is an owner and operator of tanker vessels focusing on the transportation of petroleum products (clean and dirty) and bulk liquid chemicals.

On July 1, 2008, Navios Acquisition completed its IPO. On May 28, 2010, Navios Acquisition consummated the vessel acquisition, which constituted its initial business combination. Following such transaction, Navios Acquisition commenced its operations as an operating company. On that date, Navios Holdings acquired control over Navios Acquisition, and consequently concluded a business combination had occurred and consolidated the results of Navios Acquisition from that date until March 30, 2011.

On May 28, 2010, Navios Holdings entered into (a) a management agreement with Navios Acquisition pursuant to which Navios Tankers Management Inc. (the “Tankers Manager”) provides Navios Acquisition commercial and technical management services; (b) an administrative services agreement with the Tankers Manager pursuant to which the Tankers Manager provides Navios Acquisition administrative services and is in turn reimbursed for reasonable costs and expenses; and (c) an omnibus agreement with Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners (the “Acquisition Omnibus Agreement”) in connection with the closing of Navios Acquisition’s vessel acquisition, governing, among other things, competition and rights of first offer on certain types of vessels and businesses.

On March 30, 2011, Navios Holdings exchanged 7,676,000 shares of Navios Acquisition common stock it held for 1,000 shares of non-voting Series C Convertible Preferred Stock of Navios Acquisition and had 45.0% of the voting power and 53.7% of the economic interest in Navios Acquisition, since the preferred stock is considered, in substance, common stock for accounting purposes. From March 30, 2011, Navios Acquisition has been considered as an affiliate entity of Navios Holdings and not as a controlled subsidiary of the Company.

In February, May and September 2013, Navios Acquisition completed multiple offerings, including registered direct offerings and private placements to Navios Holdings and certain members of the management of Navios Acquisition, Navios Partners and Navios Holdings. A total of 94,097,529 shares were issued. As part of these offerings, Navios Holdings purchased in private placements an aggregate of 46,969,669 shares of Navios Acquisition common stock for $160.0 million. In February 2014, Navios Acquisition completed a public offering of 14,950,000 shares of its common stock.

As of December 31, 2017, Navios Holdings’ ownership of the outstanding voting stock of Navios Acquisition was 42.9% and its economic interest in Navios Acquisition was 46.2%.

 

46


Table of Contents

Navios Europe I

Navios Europe I is engaged in the marine transportation industry through the ownership of five tanker and five container vessels.

On October 9, 2013, Navios Holdings, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners established Navios Europe I under the laws of Marshall Islands and have economic interests of 47.5%, 47.5% and 5.0%, respectively and effective from November 2014, voting interests of 50%, 50% and 0%, respectively. On December 18, 2013, Navios Europe I acquired ten vessels for aggregate consideration consisting of (i) cash (which was funded with the proceeds of senior loan facilities (the “Senior Loans I”) and loans aggregating to $10.0 million from Navios Holdings, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners (in each case, in proportion to their economic interests in Navios Europe I) (collectively, the “Navios Term Loans I”) and (ii) the assumption of a junior participating loan facility (the “Junior Loan I”). In addition to the Navios Term Loans I, Navios Holdings, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners also made available to Navios Europe I revolving loans of up to $24.1 million to fund working capital requirements (collectively, the “Navios Revolving Loans I”)..

Refer also to “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” in “Recent Developments”.

Navios Midstream

Navios Midstream (NYSE: NAP) is a publicly traded master limited partnership which owns and operates crude oil tankers under long-term employment contracts.

On October 13, 2014, Navios Acquisition formed Navios Midstream under the laws of the Marshall Islands. Navios Maritime Midstream Partners GP LLC, or the Midstream General Partner, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Navios Acquisition, was also formed on that date to act as the general partner of Navios Midstream and received a 2.0% general partner interest in Navios Midstream.

As of December 31, 2017, and following the completion of the Navios Midstream’s IPO in November 2014 and the issuance of 1,592,920 of Subordinated Series A Units to Navios Acquisition in June 2015, Navios Acquisition had 59.0% interest and Navios Holdings had indirect economic interest of 27.2% (through its ownership in Navios Acquisition) and no direct equity interest.

On or prior to the closing of Navios Midstream’s IPO, Navios Holdings entered into certain agreements with Navios Midstream: (a) a management agreement with Navios Midstream pursuant to which the Tankers Manager, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Navios Holdings, provides Navios Midstream with commercial and technical management services; (b) an administrative services agreement with the Tankers Manager pursuant to which the Tankers Manager provides Navios Midstream administrative services; and (c) an omnibus agreement with Navios Midstream, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners, governing, among other things, when Navios Holdings, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners may compete with Navios Midstream.

At the same time, Navios Holdings entered into an option agreement with Navios Acquisition, which expires on November 18, 2024, under which Navios Acquisition, which owns and controls Midstream General Partner, granted Navios Holdings the option to acquire a minimum of 25.0% of the outstanding membership interests in Midstream General Partner, and the incentive distribution rights in Navios Midstream at fair value. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Holdings had not exercised any part of that option.

Navios Europe II

Navios Europe II is engaged in the marine transportation industry through the ownership of seven dry bulkers and seven container vessels.

On February 18, 2015, Navios Holdings, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners established Navios Europe II under the laws of Marshall Islands and have economic interests of 47.5%, 47.5% and 5.0%, respectively, and voting interests of 50.0%, 50.0% and 0%, respectively. From June 8, 2015 through December 31, 2015, Navios Europe II acquired 14 vessels for aggregate consideration consisting of: (i) cash (which was funded with the proceeds of a senior loan facility (the “Senior Loans II”) and loans aggregating to $14.0 million from Navios Holdings, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners (in each case, in proportion to their economic interests in Navios Europe II) (collectively, the “Navios Term Loans II”) and (ii) the assumption of a junior participating loan facility (the “Junior Loan II”). In addition to the Navios Term Loans II, Navios Holdings, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners will also make available to Navios Europe II revolving loans up to $43.5 million to fund working capital requirements (collectively, the “Navios Revolving Loans II”). In March 2017, the amount of the Navios Revolving Loans II increased by $14.0 million.

Navios Containers

Navios Containers is a growth vehicle dedicated to the container sector of the maritime industry. On June 8, 2017, Navios

 

47


Table of Contents

Containers completed a private placement and Navios Holdings invested $5.0 million. Navios Containers registered its shares on the Norwegian Over-The-Counter Market (N-OTC) on June 12, 2017 under the ticker “NMCI”. On August 29, 2017 and on November 9, 2017, Navios Containers closed additional private placements.

As of December 31, 2017, Navios Holdings owned 3.4% of Navios Containers’ common stock and warrants, representing 1.7% of the equity of Navios Containers.

B. Business overview

Introduction

Navios Holdings is a global, vertically integrated seaborne shipping and logistics company focused on the transport and transshipment of dry bulk commodities including iron ore, coal and grain. For over 60 years, Navios Holdings has had an in-house ship management expertise that has worked with producers of raw materials, agricultural traders and exporters, industrial end-users, ship owners, and charterers. Navios Holdings’ current core fleet (excluding the Navios Logistics fleet), the average age of which is approximately 7.7 years, basis fully delivered fleet, consists of a total of 71 vessels, aggregating approximately 7.2 million dwt. Navios Holdings owns 14 Capesize vessels (169,000-182,000 dwt), eleven modern Ultra Handymax vessels (50,000-59,000 dwt), twelve Panamax vessels (74,000-85,000 dwt) and one Handysize vessel. It also time charters-in and operates a fleet of six Ultra Handymax, one Handysize, 19 Panamax, and seven Capesize vessels under long-term time charters. Navios Holdings has options to acquire 23 time chartered-in vessels (on one of which Navios Holdings holds an initial 50% purchase option).

Navios Holdings also offers commercial and technical management services to the fleets of Navios Partners, Navios Acquisition, Navios Midstream, Navios Europe I, Navios Europe II and Navios Containers. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Partners’ fleet was comprised of 29 drybulk vessels and seven Container vessels. In each of October 2013, August 2014, February 2015, February 2016 and November 2017, the Company amended its existing management agreement with Navios Partners to fix the fees for ship management services of its owned fleet at: (i) $4,225 daily rate per Ultra-Handymax vessel; (ii) $4,325 daily rate per Panamax vessel; (iii) $5,250 daily rate per Capesize vessel; (iv) $6,700 daily rate per container vessel of TEU 6,800; (v) $7,400 daily rate per container vessel of more than TEU 8,000; and (vi) $8,750 daily rate per very large container vessel of more than TEU 13,000 through December 31, 2019. Drydocking expenses under this agreement will be reimbursed by Navios Partners at cost at occurrence. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Acquisition’s fleet was comprised of 28 tankers and eight VLCC vessels. In May 2016, Navios Holdings amended its agreement with Navios Acquisition to fix the fees for ship management services of Navios Acquisition owned fleet at a daily fee of (i) $6,350 per MR2 product tanker and chemical tanker vessel; (ii) $7,150 per LR1 product tanker vessel; and (iii) $9,500 per VLCC through May 2018. Drydocking expenses under this agreement will be reimbursed at cost at occurrence for all vessels. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Midstream’s fleet was comprised of six VLCC vessels and Navios Holdings receives a daily management fee of $9,500 per VLCC vessel. Drydocking expenses under this agreement will be reimbursed by Navios Midstream at cost at occurrence. Navios Europe I’s fleet was comprised of five tankers and five container vessels and management fees and drydocking expenses under the management agreement will be reimbursed at cost at occurrence. Navios Europe II’s fleet was comprised of seven dry bulker and seven container vessels and management fees and drydocking expenses under the management agreement will be reimbursed at cost at occurrence. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Containers’ fleet was comprised of 21 container vessels. The fee for the ship management services provided by Navios Holdings is a daily fee of $6,100 per day for 4,250 TEU, 3,450 TEU and 5,500 TEU container vessels. Drydocking expenses under this agreement are reimbursed by Navios Containers at cost.

Navios Holdings’ strategy and business model focuses on:

 

    Operation of a high quality, modern fleet. Navios Holdings owns and charters-in a modern, high quality fleet, having an average age of approximately 7.7 years, basis fully delivered fleet that provides numerous operational advantages including more efficient cargo operations, lower insurance and vessel maintenance costs, higher levels of fleet productivity, and an efficient operating cost structure.

 

    Pursuing an appropriate balance between vessel ownership and a long-term chartered-in fleet. Navios Holdings controls, through a combination of vessel ownership and long-term time chartered vessels, approximately 7.2 million dwt in tonnage, which, we believe, makes Navios Holdings one of the largest independent dry bulk operators in the world. Navios Holdings’ ability, through its long-standing relationships with various shipyards and trading houses, to charter-in vessels allows it to control additional shipping capacity without the capital expenditures required by new vessel acquisition. In addition, having purchase options on 23 time chartered vessels permits Navios Holdings to determine when is the most commercially opportune time to own or charter-in vessels. Navios Holdings intends to monitor developments in the sales and purchase market to maintain the appropriate balance between owned and long-term time chartered vessels.

 

48


Table of Contents
    Capitalize on Navios Holdings’ established reputation. Navios Holdings believes its reputation and commercial relationships enable it to obtain favorable long-term time charters, enter into the freight market and increase its short-term tonnage capacity to complement the capacity of its core fleet, as well as to obtain access to cargo freight opportunities through COA arrangements not readily available to other industry participants. This reputation has also enabled Navios Holdings to obtain vessel acquisition terms as reflected in the purchase options contained in some of its long-term charters.

 

    Utilize industry expertise to take advantage of market volatility. The dry bulk shipping market is cyclical and volatile. Navios Holdings uses its experience in the industry, sensitivity to trends, and knowledge and expertise as to risk management to hedge against, and in some cases, to generate profit from, such volatility.

 

    Maintain customer focus and reputation for service and safety. Navios Holdings is recognized by its customers for the high quality of its service and safety record. Navios Holdings’ high standards for performance, reliability, and safety provide Navios Holdings with an advantageous competitive profile.

 

    Enhance vessel utilization and profitability through a mix of spot charters, time charters, and COAs. Specifically, this strategy is implemented as follows:

 

    The operation of voyage charters or spot fixtures for the carriage of a single cargo from load port to discharge port;

 

    The operation of time charters, whereby the vessel is hired out for a predetermined period but without any specification as to voyages to be performed, with the ship owner being responsible for operating costs and the charterer for voyage costs;

 

    The use of COAs, under which Navios Holdings contracts to carry a given quantity of cargo between certain load and discharge ports within a stipulated time frame, but does not specify in advance which vessels will be used to perform the voyages; and

 

    The shipping industry uses fleet utilization to measure a company’s efficiency in finding suitable employment for its vessels and minimizing the days its vessels are off-hire. At 99.7% as of December 31, 2017, Navios Holdings believes that it has one of the highest fleet utilization rates in the industry.

Competitive Advantages

Controlling approximately 7.2 million dwt (excluding Navios Logistics) in dry bulk tonnage, Navios Holdings is one of the largest independent dry bulk operators in the world. Management believes that Navios Holdings occupies a competitive position within the industry in that its reputation in the global dry bulk markets permits it to enter into at any time, and take on spot, medium or long-term freight commitments, depending on its view of future market trends. In addition, many of the long-term charter deals may be brought to the attention of Navios Holdings prior to even being quoted in the open market. Even in the open market, Navios Holdings’ solid reputation allows it to take in large amounts of tonnage on a short, medium, or long-term basis on very short notice. This ability is possessed by relatively few ship owners and operators, and is a direct consequence of Navios Holdings’ market reputation for reliability in the performance of its obligations in each of its roles as a ship owner, COA operator, and charterer. Navios Holdings, therefore, has much greater flexibility than a traditional ship owner or charterer to quickly go “long” or “short” relative to the dry bulk markets.

Navios Holdings’ long involvement and reputation for reliability in the Asian Pacific region have also allowed it to develop privileged relationships with many of the largest trading houses in Japan, such as Marubeni Corporation and Mitsui & Co. Through these institutional relationships, Navios Holdings has obtained long-term charter-in deals, with options to extend time charters and options to purchase the majority of the vessels. Through its established reputation and relationships, Navios Holdings has had access to opportunities not readily available to most other industry participants who lack Navios Holdings’ brand recognition, credibility, and track record.

In addition to its long-standing reputation and flexible business model, management believes that Navios Holdings is well-positioned in the dry bulk market on the basis of the following factors:

 

    A high-quality, modern fleet of vessels that provides a variety of operational advantages, such as lower insurance premiums, higher levels of productivity, and efficient operating cost structures, as well as a competitive advantage over owners of older fleets, especially in the time charter market, where age, fuel economy and quality of a vessel are of significant importance in competing for business;

 

49


Table of Contents
    A core fleet which has been chartered-in (some through 2030, assuming minimum available charter extension periods are exercised) on terms generally that allow Navios Holdings to charter-out the vessels at an attractive spread during strong markets and to weather down cycles in the market while maintaining low costs;

 

    Strong commercial relationships with both freight customers and Japanese trading houses and ship owners, providing Navios Holdings with access to future attractive long-term time charters on newbuildings with valuable purchase options;

 

    Strong in-house technical management team who oversee every step of technical management, from the construction of the vessels to subsequent shipping operations throughout the life of a vessel, including the superintendence of maintenance, repairs and drydocking, providing efficiency and transparency in Navios Holdings’ owned fleet operations;

 

    Visibility into worldwide commodity flows through its physical shipping operations and port terminal operations in South America; and

 

    An experienced management team with a strong track record of operational experience and a strong brand having a well established reputation for reliability and performance.

Management intends to maintain and build on these qualitative advantages, while at the same time continuing to benefit from Navios Holdings’ reputation.

Shipping Operations

Navios Holdings’ Fleet. Navios Holdings controls a core fleet of 38 owned vessels and 33 chartered-in vessels (all of which have purchase options). The average age of the fleet is 7.7 years, basis fully delivered fleet.

Owned Fleet. Navios Holdings owns and operates a fleet comprised of eleven modern Ultra Handymax vessels, 14 Capesize vessels, twelve Panamax vessels and one Handysize vessel.

Owned Vessels

 

Vessel Name

   Vessel Type    Year Built    Deadweight
(in metric tons)
 

Navios Serenity

   Handysize    2011      34,690  

Navios Achilles

   Ultra Handymax    2001      52,063  

Navios Vector

   Ultra Handymax    2002      50,296  

Navios Meridian

   Ultra Handymax    2002      50,316  

Navios Mercator

   Ultra Handymax    2002      53,553  

Navios Arc

   Ultra Handymax    2003      53,514  

Navios Hios

   Ultra Handymax    2003      55,180  

Navios Kypros

   Ultra Handymax    2003      55,222  

Navios Astra

   Ultra Handymax    2006      53,468  

Navios Ulysses

   Ultra Handymax    2007      55,728  

Navios Celestial

   Ultra Handymax    2009      58,063  

Navios Vega

   Ultra Handymax    2009      58,792  

Navios Magellan

   Panamax    2000      74,333  

Navios Star

   Panamax    2002      76,662  

Navios Northern Star

   Panamax    2005      75,395  

Navios Amitie

   Panamax    2005      75,395  

Navios Taurus

   Panamax    2005      76,596  

Navios Asteriks

   Panamax    2005      76,801  

N Amalthia

   Panamax    2006      75,318  

Navios Galileo

   Panamax    2006      76,596  

N Bonanza

   Panamax    2006      76,596  

Navios Avior

   Panamax    2012      81,355  

Navios Centaurus

   Panamax    2012      81,472  

Navios Sphera

   Panamax    2016      84,872  

Navios Equator Prosper

   Capesize    2000      171,191  

 

50


Table of Contents

Navios Stellar

   Capesize    2009      169,001  

Navios Bonavis

   Capesize    2009      180,022  

Navios Happiness

   Capesize    2009      180,022  

Navios Phoenix

   Capesize    2009      180,242  

Navios Lumen

   Capesize    2009      180,661  

Navios Antares

   Capesize    2010      169,059  

Navios Etoile

   Capesize    2010      179,234  

Navios Bonheur

   Capesize    2010      179,259  

Navios Altamira

   Capesize    2011      179,165  

Navios Azimuth

   Capesize    2011      179,169  

Navios Ray

   Capesize    2012      179,515  

Navios Gem

   Capesize    2014      181,336  

Navios Mars

   Capesize    2016      181,259  

Long-Term Fleet. In addition to the 38 owned vessels, Navios Holdings controls a fleet of seven Capesize, 19 Panamax, six Ultra Handymax, and one Handysize vessels under long-term time charters (including seven Panamax vessels to be delivered through the end of 2019), having an average age of approximately 4.4 years, basis fully delivered fleet.

Long-term Chartered-in Fleet in Operation

 

Vessel Name

   Vessel Type    Year
Built
   Deadweight
(in metric tons)
     Purchase
Option (1)

Navios Lyra

   Handysize    2012      34,718      Yes(2)

Navios Primavera

   Ultra Handymax    2007      53,464      Yes

Mercury Ocean

   Ultra Handymax    2008      53,452      No

Kouju Lily

   Ultra Handymax    2011      58,872      No

Navios Oriana

   Ultra Handymax    2012      61,442      Yes

Navios Mercury

   Ultra Handymax    2013      61,393      Yes

Navios Venus

   Ultra Handymax    2015      61,339      Yes

Osmarine

   Panamax    2006      76,000      No

Navios Aldebaran

   Panamax    2008      76,500      Yes

KM Imabari

   Panamax    2009      76,619      No

Navios Marco Polo

   Panamax    2011      80,647      Yes

Navios Southern Star

   Panamax    2013      82,224      Yes

Sea Victory

   Panamax    2014      77,095      Yes

Navios Amber

   Panamax    2015      80,994      Yes

Navios Sky

   Panamax    2015      82,056      Yes

Navios Coral

   Panamax    2016      84,904      Yes

Navios Citrine

   Panamax    2017      81,626      Yes

Navios Dolphin

   Panamax    2017      81,630      Yes

Elsa S

   Panamax    2015      80,954      No

Pacific Explorer

   Capesize    2007      177,000      No

King Ore

   Capesize    2010      176,800      Yes

Navios Koyo

   Capesize    2011      181,415      Yes

Navios Obeliks

   Capesize    2012      181,415      Yes

Dream Canary

   Capesize    2015      180,528      Yes

Dream Coral

   Capesize    2015      181,249      Yes

Navios Felix

   Capesize    2016      181,221      Yes

Long-term Chartered-in Fleet to be delivered

 

Vessel Name

   Vessel Type    Delivery
Date
   Deadweight
(in metric tons)
     Purchase
Option (1)

TBN

   Panamax    April 2018      82,000      No

TBN

   Panamax    May 2018      82,000      No

TBN

   Panamax    Q4 2018      81,500      No(3)

TBN

   Panamax    Q1 2019      81,500      No(3)

 

51


Table of Contents

Long-term Bareboat Chartered-in Fleet to be delivered

 

Vessel Name

   Vessel Type    Delivery
Date
   Deadweight
(in metric tons)
     Purchase
Option (1)

TBN

   Panamax    Q4 2019      82,000      Yes

TBN

   Panamax    Q1 2020      82,000      Yes

TBN

   Panamax    Q4 2019      82,000      Yes

 

(1)    Generally, Navios Holdings may exercise its purchase option after three to five years of service.
(2)    Navios Holdings holds the initial 50% purchase option on the vessel.
(3)    Navios Holdings has the right of first refusal and profit share on sale of vessel.

Many of Navios Holdings’ current long-term chartered-in vessels are chartered from ship owners with whom Navios Holdings has long-standing relationships. Navios Holdings pays these ship owners daily rates of hire for such vessels, and then charters out these vessels to other parties, who pay Navios Holdings a daily rate of hire. Navios Holdings also enters into COAs pursuant to which Navios Holdings has agreed to carry cargoes, typically for industrial customers, who export or import dry bulk cargoes. Further, Navios Holdings enters into spot market voyage contracts, where Navios Holdings is paid a rate per ton to carry a specified cargo from point A to point B.

Short-Term Fleet: Navios Holdings’ “short-term fleet” is comprised of Capesize, Panamax and Ultra Handymax vessels chartered-in for duration of less than 12 months. The number of short-term vessels varies from time to time. These vessels are not included in the “core fleet” of the Company.

Exercise of Vessel Purchase Options

Navios Holdings has executed several purchase options comprising of six Ultra Handymax, six Panamax and one Capesize vessels, which were delivered on various dates from November 30, 2005 until February 21, 2011. Navios Holdings currently has options to acquire 23 chartered-in vessels currently in operation (on one of the 23 purchase options Navios Holdings holds a 50% initial purchase option).

Commercial Ship Management: Commercial management of Navios Holdings’, Navios Partners, Navios Acquisition’s, Navios Midstream’s, Navios Europe I’s, Navios Europe II’s and Navios Containers’ fleet involves identifying and negotiating charter party employment for the vessels. In addition to its internal commercial ship management capabilities, Navios Holdings uses the services of a related party, Acropolis Chartering & Shipping Inc. (“Acropolis”), based in Piraeus, as well as numerous third-party charter brokers, to solicit, research, and propose charters for its vessels. Charter brokers research and negotiate with different charterers, and propose charters to Navios Holdings for cargoes suitable for carriage by Navios Holdings’, Navios Partners, Navios Acquisition’s, Navios Midstream’s, Navios Europe I’s, Navios Europe II’s and Navios Containers’ vessels. Navios Holdings then evaluates the employment opportunities available for each type of vessel and arranges cargo and country exclusions, bunkers, loading and discharging conditions, and demurrage.

Technical Ship Management: Navios Holdings provides, through its subsidiaries, Navios Shipmanagement Inc., Navios Containers Management Inc. and Navios Tankers Management Inc., technical ship management and maintenance services to its owned vessels and has also provided such services to Navios Partners’, Navios Acquisition’s, Navios Midstream’s, Navios Europe I’s, Navios Europe II’s and Navios Containers’ vessels under the terms of the management agreements between the parties. Based in Piraeus, Greece, Monaco and Singapore, this operation is run by experienced professionals who oversee every step of technical management, from the construction of the vessels to subsequent shipping operations throughout the life of a vessel, including the superintendence of maintenance, repairs and drydocking.

Operation of the Fleet: The operations departments supervise the post-fixture business of the vessels in Navios Holdings’, Navios Partners, Navios Acquisition’s, Navios Midstream’s, Navios Europe I’s, Navios Europe II’s and Navios Containers’ fleet (i.e., once the vessel is chartered and being employed) by monitoring their daily positions to ensure that the terms and conditions of the charters are being fulfilled.

 

52


Table of Contents

Financial Risk Management: Navios Holdings actively engages in assessing financial risks associated with fluctuating future freight rates, daily time charter hire rates, fuel prices, credit risks, interest rates and foreign exchange rates. Financial risk management is carried out under policies approved and guidelines established by the Company’s executive management.

 

    Freight Rate Risk. Navios Holdings may use FFAs to manage and mitigate its risk to its freight market exposures in shipping capacity and freight commitments and respond to fluctuations in the dry bulk shipping market by augmenting its overall long or short position. See “Risk Factors — Risks Associated with the Shipping Industry and Our Dry bulk Operations — Trading and complementary hedging activities in freight, tonnage and FFAs subject us to trading risks, and we may suffer trading losses which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations” for additional detail on the financial implications, and risks of our use of FFAs. Currently, Navios Holdings holds no FFA contracts.

 

    Credit Risk. Navios Holdings closely monitors its credit exposure to charterers and FFAs counterparties. Navios Holdings has established policies to ensure that contracts are entered into with counterparties that have appropriate credit history. Counterparties and cash transactions are limited to high quality credit collateralized corporations and financial institutions. Most importantly, Navios Holdings has guidelines and policies that are designed to limit the amount of credit exposure.

 

    Interest Rate Risk. Navios Holdings may use from time to time interest rate swap agreements to reduce exposure to fluctuations in interest rates. These instruments allow Navios Holdings to raise long-term borrowings at floating rates and swap them into fixed rates. Although these instruments are intended to minimize the anticipated financing costs and maximize gains for Navios Holdings that may be set off against interest expense, they may also result in losses, which would increase financing costs. Currently, Navios Holdings holds no interest rate swap contracts. See also item 11 “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risks — Interest Rate Risk.”

 

    Foreign Exchange Risk. Although Navios Holdings’ revenues are U.S. dollar-based, 24.7% of its expenses, related to its Navios Logistics segment, are in Uruguayan pesos, Argentinean pesos, Paraguayan Guaranies and Brazilian Reales and 14.2% of its expenses related to operation of its Greek, Belgian and Monaco offices, are in Euros. Navios Holdings monitors its Euro, Argentinean Peso, Uruguayan Peso, Paraguayan Guarani and Brazilian Real exposure against long-term currency forecasts and enters into foreign currency contracts when considered appropriate.

Customers

Dry bulk Vessel Operations

The international dry bulk shipping industry is highly fragmented and, as a result, there are numerous charterers. Navios Holdings’ assessment of a charterer’s financial condition and reliability is an important factor in negotiating employment of its vessels. Navios Holdings generally charters its vessels to major trading houses (including commodities traders), major producers and government-owned entities. Navios Holdings’ customers under charter parties, COAs, and other counterparties, include national, regional and international companies, such as Cargill International S.A., GIIC, Louis Dreyfus Commodities, Oldendorff Carriers, Swiss Marine, Rio Tinto and Mansel Ltd. For the year ended December 31, 2017, no customers accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s revenue. For the year ended December 31, 2016, two customers accounted for 14.7% and 13.1%, respectively, of the Company’s revenue. For the year ended December 31, 2015, one customer accounted for 15.1% of the Company’s revenue.

Logistics Business Operations

Customers of Navios Logistics include affiliates of ADM, Axion Energy, Bunge, Cargill, Glencore, Louis Dreyfus, Petrobras, Petropar (the national oil company of Paraguay), Shell, Vale, Vitol and YPF. Navios Logistics has a long history of operating in the Hidrovia region and has been able to generate and maintain longstanding relationships with its customers. In its grain port facilities in Uruguay, Navios Logistics has been serving three of its key customers, ADM, Cargill and Louis Dreyfus, for more than 19 years on average. In its liquid port facility, liquid barge transportation and cabotage business, Navios Logistics has had long-term relationships with its global petroleum customers for more than 16 years on average (such as Axion Energy, Petrobras Group, YPF and Shell or their successors). In its dry barge business, Navios Logistics started its relationship with Vale in 2008 for iron ore transportation and has signed new contracts since then. Navios Logistics is committed to providing quality logistics services for its customers and further developing and maintaining its long-term relationships.

Concentrations of credit risk with respect to accounts receivables are limited due to Navios Logistics’ large number of customers, who are established international operators and have an appropriate credit history. Due to these factors, management believes that no additional credit risk, beyond amounts provided for collection losses, is inherent in its trade receivables. For the year ended December 31, 2017, Navios Logistics’ three largest customers, Vale, YPF and Axion Energy accounted for 20.3%, 13.7% and

 

53


Table of Contents

12.7% of its revenues, respectively, and its five largest customers accounted for approximately 61.9% of its revenues. For the year ended December 31, 2016, its three largest customers, Vale, Axion Energy and Cammessa accounted for 28.0%, 13.8% and 11.5% of its revenues, respectively, and its five largest customers accounted for approximately 67.4% of its revenues. For the year ended December 31, 2015, its two largest customers, Vale and Cammessa accounted for 27.8% and 12.9% of its revenues, respectively, and its five largest customers accounted for approximately 61.7% of its revenues. Other than its largest customers mentioned above, no other customer accounted for more than 10% of Navios Logistics’ revenues during the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015.

Competition

The dry bulk shipping markets are extensive, diversified, competitive and highly fragmented, divided among 1,938 independent dry bulk carrier owners. The world’s active dry bulk fleet consists of approximately 11,200 vessels, aggregating approximately 824 million dwt as of April 1, 2018. As a general principle, the smaller the cargo carrying capacity of a dry bulk carrier, the more fragmented is its market, both with regard to charterers and vessel owner/operators. Even among the larger dry bulk owners and operators, whose vessels are mainly in the larger sizes, only nine companies are known to have fleets of 100 vessels or more after the merger of the two largest Chinese shipping companies, China Ocean Shipping and China Shipping Group into China COSCO Shipping. The other eight are the largest Japanese shipping companies, Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Kawasaki Kisen and Nippon Yusen Kaisha plus the Fredriksen Group, Wisdom Marine, China Merchants, Pacific Basin and Oldendorff Carriers. There are about 41 owners known to have fleets of between 30 and 100 vessels. However, vessel ownership is not the only determinant of fleet control. Many owners of bulk carriers charter their vessels out for extended periods, not just to end users (owners of cargo), but also to other owner/operators and to tonnage pools. Such operators may, at any given time, control a fleet many times the size of their owned tonnage. Navios Holdings is one such operator; others include Cargill, Pacific Basin Shipping, Bocimar, Zodiac Maritime, Louis Dreyfus/Cetragpa, Cobelfret, Torvald Klaveness and Swiss Marine.

It is likely that we will face substantial competition for long-term charter business from a number of experienced companies. Many of these competitors will have significantly greater financial resources than we do. It is also likely that we will face increased numbers of competitors entering into our transportation sectors, including in the dry bulk sector. Many of these competitors have strong reputations and extensive resources and experience. Increased competition may cause greater price competition, especially for long-term charters.

Navios Logistics

Navios Logistics is one of the largest logistics providers in the Hidrovia region of South America. Navios Logistics believes its ownership of river ports, including its port terminals in Uruguay that provides access to the ocean, allows it to offer a logistics solution superior to its competitors that also operate barges and pushboats. Navios Logistics also competes based on reliability, efficiency and price.

With respect to loading, storage and ancillary services, the market is divided between transits and exports, depending on the cargo origin. In the case of transits there are other companies operating in the river system that are able to offer services similar to Navios Logistics. However, most of these companies are proprietary service providers that are focused on servicing their own cargo. Unlike these companies, Navios Logistics is an independent service provider in the market for transits. With respect to exports, its competitors are Montevideo Port in Montevideo and Ontur in Nueva Palmira, and TGU in Nueva Palmira. The main competitor of its liquid port terminal in Paraguay is Petropar, a Paraguayan state-owned entity. Other competitors include Copetrol, TLP, Trafigura Pte Ltd and Petrobras.

Navios Logistics faces competition in its barge and cabotage businesses with transportation of oil and refined petroleum products from other independent ship owners and from vessel operators who primarily charter vessels to meet their cargo carrying needs. The charter markets in which Navios Logistics’ vessels compete are highly competitive. Key competitors include the successor of Ultrapetrol Bahamas Ltd., Hidrovias do Brasil, Interbarge, P&O, Imperial Shipping and Fluviomar. In addition, some of Navios Logistics’ customers, including ADM, Cargill, Louis Dreyfus and Vale, have some of their own dedicated barge capacity, which they can use to transport cargo in lieu of hiring a third party. Navios Logistics also competes indirectly with other forms of land-based transportation such as truck and rail. Competition is primarily based on prevailing market contract rates, vessel location and vessel manager know-how, reputation and credibility. These companies and other smaller entities are regular competitors of Navios Logistics in its primary tanker trading areas.

Navios Logistics believes that its ability to combine its ports in Uruguay and Paraguay with its versatile fleet of barges, pushboats and tankers to offer integrated, end-to-end logistics solutions for both its dry and liquid customers seeking to transport mineral and grain commodities and liquid cargoes through the Hidrovia region has allowed Navios Logistics to differentiate its business and offer superior services compared to its competitors.

 

54


Table of Contents

Intellectual Property

We consider NAVIOS to be our proprietary trademark, service mark and trade name. We hold several U.S. and E.U. trademark registrations for our proprietary logos and the domain name registration for our website.

Governmental and Other Regulations

Sources of Applicable Rules and Standards: Shipping is one of the world’s most heavily regulated industries, and, in addition, it is subject to many industry standards. Government regulation significantly affects the ownership and operation of vessels. These regulations consist mainly of rules and standards established by international conventions, but they also include national, state, and local laws and regulations in force in jurisdictions where vessels may operate or are registered, and which are commonly more stringent than international rules and standards. This is the case particularly in the U.S. and, increasingly, in Europe.

A variety of governmental and private entities subject vessels to both scheduled and unscheduled inspections. These entities include local port authorities (the U.S. Coast Guard, harbor masters or equivalent entities), classification societies, flag state administration (country vessel of registry), and charterers, particularly terminal operators. Certain of these entities require vessel owners to obtain permits, licenses, and certificates for the operation of their vessels. Failure to maintain necessary permits or approvals could require a vessel owner to incur substantial costs or temporarily suspend operation of one or more of its vessels.

Heightened levels of environmental and quality concerns among insurance underwriters, regulators, and charterers continue to lead to greater inspection and safety requirements on all vessels and may accelerate the scrapping of older vessels throughout the industry. Increasing environmental concerns have created a demand for vessels that conform to stricter environmental standards. Vessel owners are required to maintain operating standards for all vessels that will emphasize operational safety, quality maintenance, continuous training of officers and crews and compliance with U.S. and international regulations.

International Environmental Regulations: The International Maritime Organization (“IMO”) has adopted a number of international conventions concerned with ship safety and with preventing, reducing or controlling pollution from ships. These fall into two main categories, consisting firstly of those concerned generally with ship safety standards, and secondly of those specifically concerned with measures to prevent pollution.

Ship Safety Regulation: In the former category the primary international instrument is the Safety of Life at Sea Convention of 1974(“SOLAS”), as amended, together with the regulations and codes of practice that form part of its regime. Much of SOLAS is not directly concerned with preventing pollution, but some of its safety provisions are intended to prevent pollution as well as promote safety of life and preservation of property. These regulations have been and continue to be regularly amended as new and higher safety standards are introduced with which we are required to comply.

An amendment of SOLAS introduced the International Safety Management (ISM) Code, which has been effective since July 1998. Under the ISM Code, the party with operational control of a vessel is required to develop an extensive safety management system that includes, among other things, the adoption of a safety and environmental protection policy setting forth instructions and procedures for operating its vessels safely and describing procedures for responding to emergencies. The ISM Code requires that vessel operators obtain a safety management certificate for each vessel they operate. This certificate evidences compliance by a vessel’s management with code requirements for a safety management system. No vessel can obtain a certificate unless its manager has been awarded a document of compliance, issued by the flag state for the vessel, under the ISM Code. Noncompliance with the ISM Code and other IMO regulations, such as the mandatory ship energy efficiency management plan (“SEEMP”) which is akin to a safety management plan and came into effect on January 1, 2013, may subject a ship owner to increased liability, may invalidate or lead to decreases in available insurance coverage for affected vessels, and may result in the denial of access to, or detention in, some ports. For example, the U.S. Coast Guard and EU authorities have indicated that vessels not in compliance with the ISM Code will be prohibited from trading in ports in the U.S. and EU respectively.

Another amendment of SOLAS, made after the terrorist attacks in the U.S. on September 11, 2001, introduced special measures to enhance maritime security, including the International Ship and Port Facilities Security Code (“ISPS Code”).

Our owned fleet maintains ISM and ISPS certifications for safety and security of operations. Each vessel’s certificate must be periodically renewed and compliance must be periodically verified. In addition, the Manager voluntarily implements and maintains certifications pursuant to the International Organization for Standardization (“ISO”), for its office and ships covering both quality of services and environmental protection (ISO 9001 and ISO 14001, respectively).

 

55


Table of Contents

International Regulations to Prevent Pollution from Ships: In the second main category of international regulation, the primary instrument is the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (“MARPOL”), which imposes environmental standards on the shipping industry set out in Annexes I-VI of MARPOL. These contain regulations for the prevention of pollution by oil (Annex I), by noxious liquid substances in bulk (Annex II), by harmful substances in packaged forms within the scope of the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (Annex III), by sewage (Annex IV), by garbage (Annex V), and by air emissions (Annex VI).

These regulations have been and continue to be regularly amended as new and more stringent standards of pollution prevention are introduced with which we are required to comply.

For example, MARPOL Annex VI, together with the NOx Technical Code established thereunder, sets limits on sulphur oxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from ship exhausts and prohibits deliberate emissions of ozone depleting substances, such as chlorofluorocarbons. It also includes a global cap on the sulphur content of fuel oil and allows for special areas to be established with more stringent controls on emissions. Originally adopted in September 1997, Annex VI came into force in May 2005 and was amended in October 2008 (as was the NOx Technical Code) to provide for progressively more stringent limits on such emissions from 2010 onwards. The new standards seek to reduce air pollution from vessels by, among other things, establishing a series of progressive requirements to further limit the sulfur content of fuel oil that will be phased in through 2020 and by establishing new tiers of nitrogen oxide emission standards for new marine diesel engines, depending on their date of installation. Additionally, more stringent emission standards apply in the coastal areas designated emission control areas (“ECAs). Thus far, ECAs have been formally adopted for the Baltic Sea area (limits SOx emissions only); the North Sea area including the English Channel (limiting SOx emissions only) and the North American ECA (which came into effect on August 1, 2012 limiting SOx, NOx and particulate matter emissions). In October 2016, the IMO approved the designation of the North Sea and the Baltic Sea as ECAs for NOx under Annex VI, which would take effect in January 2021. The U.S. Caribbean Sea ECA entered into force on January 1, 2013 and has been effective since January 1, 2014, limiting SOx, NOx and particulate matter emissions. In January 2015, the limit for fuel oil sulfur levels fell to 0.10% m/m in ECAs established to limit SOx and particulate matter emissions.

After considering the issue for many years, the IMO announced on October 27, 2016 that it was proceeding with a requirement for 0.5% m/m sulfur content in marine fuel (down from current levels of 3.5%) outside the ECAs starting on January 1, 2020. Under Annex VI, the 2020 date was subject to review as to the availability of the required fuel oil. Annex VI required the fuel availability review to be completed by 2018 but was ultimately completed in 2016. Therefore, by 2020, ships will be required to remove sulfur from emissions through the use of emission control equipment, or purchase marine fuel with 0.5% sulfur content, which may see increased demand and higher prices due to supply constraints. Installing pollution control equipment or using lower sulfur fuel could result in significantly increased costs to our company. Similarly, Annex VI requires Tier III standards for NOx emissions to be applied to ships constructed and engines installed in ships operating in NOx ECAs from January 1, 2016. The IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (the “MEPC”) adopted amendments (effective September 2015) to Annex VI, regulation 13, regarding NOx and the date for the implementation of the “Tier III” standards within ECAs. These amendments provide, inter alia, that such standards, applicable on January 1, 2016, apply to marine diesel engines installed on ships which operate in the North American ECA or the U.S. Caribbean Sea ECA and to installed marine diesel engines which operate in other ECAs which might be designated in the future for Tier III NOx control. At the 69th session (2016), Annex VI was also amended to require recordkeeping requirements to demonstrate compliance with the NOX Tier III ECA.

Certain jurisdictions have adopted more stringent requirements. For instance, California has also adopted more stringent low sulfur fuel requirements within California-regulated waters. We anticipate incurring costs to comply with these more stringent standards by implementing measures such as fuel switching, vessel modification adding distillate fuel storage capacity, or addition of exhaust gas cleaning scrubbers, and may require installation and operation of further control equipment at significantly increased cost. While it is unclear how the new emissions standard will affect the employment of our vessels, over time it is possible that ships not retrofitted to comply with new standards will become less competitive.

The IMO has introduced the first ever mandatory measures for an international greenhouse gas reduction regime for a global industry sector. These energy efficiency measures apply to all ships of 400 gross tonnage and above. They include the development of a ship energy efficiency management plan (“SEEMP”) which is akin to a safety management plan. At its 66th session (2014), the MEPC continued its work on developing technical and operational measures relating to energy-efficiency measures for ships, following the entry into force of the mandatory efficiency measures on January 1, 2013. It adopted the 2014 Guidelines on the Method of Calculation of the Attained EEDI, applicable to new ships. It further adopted amendments to MARPOL Annex VI concerning the extension of the scope of application of the EEDI to Liquified Natural Gas (“LNG”) carriers, ro-ro cargo ships (vehicle carriers), ro-ro cargo ships, ro-ro passenger ships and cruise passengers ships with nonconventional propulsion. At its 67th session (2014), the MEPC adopted the 2014 Guidelines on survey and certification of the EEDI, updating the previous version to reference ships fitted with dual-fuel engines using LNG and liquid fuel oil. The MEPC also adopted amendments to the 2013 Interim Guidelines for determining minimum propulsion power to maintain the maneuverability of ships in adverse conditions, to make the guidelines applicable to phase 1 (starting January 1, 2015) of the EEDI requirements. At its 68th session (2015), the MEPC amended the 2014 Guidelines on EEDI survey and certification as well as the method of calculating of EEDI for new ships. At its 70th session (2016), the MEPC again amended the method of calculating EEDI, and adopted mandatory requirements for ships of 5,000 gross tonnage or greater to collect fuel consumption data for each type of fuel used, and report the data to the flag State after the end of each calendar year.

 

56


Table of Contents

The revised Annex I to the MARPOL Convention entered into force in January 2007. It incorporates various amendments to the MARPOL Convention and imposes construction requirements for oil tankers delivered on or after January 1, 2010. On August 1, 2007, Regulation 12A (an amendment to Annex I) came into force imposing performance standards for accidental oil fuel outflow and requiring oil fuel tanks to be located inside the double-hull in all ships with an aggregate oil fuel capacity of 600 cubic meters and above, and which are delivered on or after August 1, 2010, including ships for which the building contract is entered into on or after August 1, 2007 or, in the absence of a contract, for which keel is laid on or after February 1, 2008. We intend that all of our newbuild tanker vessels, if any, will comply with Regulation 12A.

Greenhouse Gas (“GHG”) Emissions: In February 2005, the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (the “Kyoto Protcol”) entered into force. Pursuant to the Kyoto Protocol, adopting countries are required to implement national programs to reduce emissions of certain gases, generally referred to as greenhouse gases, which are suspected of contributing to global warming. Currently, the greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping do not come under the Kyoto Protocol.

In December 2011, United Nations climate change talks took place in Durban and concluded with an agreement referred to as the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action. In preparation for the Durban Conference, the International Chamber of Shipping (“ICS”) produced a briefing document, confirming the shipping industry’s commitment to cut shipping emissions by 20% by 2020, with significant further reductions thereafter. The ICS called on the participants in the Durban Conference to give the IMO a clear mandate to deliver emissions reductions through market-based measures, for example a shipping industry environmental compensation fund. Notwithstanding the ICS’ request for global regulation of the shipping industry, the Durban Conference did not result in any proposals specifically addressing the shipping industry’s role in climate change.

Although regulation of greenhouse gas emissions in the shipping industry was discussed during the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris (the “Paris Conference”), the agreement reached among the 195 nations, which entered into force on November 4, 2016, did not expressly reference the shipping industry. Following the Paris Conference, the IMO announced it would continue its efforts on this issue at the MEPC, and at its 70th session, the MEPC approved a Roadmap for developing a comprehensive GHG emissions reduction strategy for ships, which includes the goal of adopting an initial strategy and emission reduction commitments in 2018 with a goal of adopting a revised strategy in 2023 to include short-, mid- and long-term reduction measures and schedules for implementation. In April 2018, the committee charged with creating the reduction strategy must finalize the initial draft of the strategy and submit a report to MEPC. The EU, Canada, the U.S. and other individual countries, states and provinces also have or are evaluating various measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping, which may include some combination of market-based instruments, a carbon tax or other mandatory reduction measures. The EU recently adopted Regulation (EU) 2015/757 concerning the monitoring, reporting and verification of carbon dioxide emissions from vessels (the “MRV Regulation”) which entered into force on July 1, 2015 (as amended by Regulation (EU) 2016/2071). The MRV Regulation applies to all vessels over 5,000 gross tonnage (except for a few types, including, but not limited to, warships and fish-catching or fish-processing vessels), irrespective of flag, in respect of carbon dioxide emissions released during voyages within the EU as well as voyages coming into and going out of the EU. The first reporting period will commence on January 1, 2018. The monitoring, reporting and verification system adopted by the MRV Regulation may be the precursor to a market-based mechanism to be adopted in the future. This EU Regulation may be seen as indicative of an intention to maintain pressure on the international negotiating process. An Implementing Regulation, which entered into force in November 2016, was also adopted setting templates for monitoring plans, emissions reports and compliance documents pursuant to Regulation 2015/757.

Further, in February 2017, EU member states met to consider independently regulating the shipping industry under the ETS. On February 15, 2017, European Parliament voted in favor of a bill to include maritime shipping in the ETS by 2023 if the IMO has not promulgated a comparable system by 2021. In November 2017, the Council of Ministers, the EU’s main decision making body, agreed that the EU should act on shipping emissions by 2023 if the IMO fails to deliver effective global measures. Last year, IMO’s urgent call to action to bring about shipping greenhouse gas emissions reductions before 2023 was met with industry push-back in many countries. Depending on how fast IMO and the EU move on this issue, the ETS may result in additional compliance costs for our vessels.

Any passage of climate control legislation or other regulatory initiatives by the IMO, EU, Canada, the U.S. or other individual jurisdictions where we operate, that restrict emissions of greenhouse gases from vessels, could require us to make significant capital expenditures and may materially increase our operating costs.

 

57


Table of Contents

Other International Regulations to Prevent Pollution: In addition to MARPOL, other more specialized international instruments have been adopted to prevent different types of pollution or environmental harm from ships. In February 2004, the IMO adopted an International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments (“BWM”) Convention. The BWM Convention’s implementing regulations call for a phased introduction of mandatory ballast water exchange requirements, to be replaced in time with mandatory concentration limits, as well as other obligations including recordkeeping requirements and implementation of a Ballast Water and Sediments Management Plan

The BWM Convention stipulates that it will enter into force twelve months after it has been adopted by at least 30 states, the combined merchant fleets of which represent at least 35% of the gross tonnage of the world’s merchant shipping. With Finland’s accession to the Agreement on September 8, 2016, the 35% threshold was reached, and the BWM convention will enter into force on September 8, 2017. Thereafter, on October 19, 2016, Panama also acceded to the BWM convention, adding its 18.02% of world gross tonnage. As of February 7, 2017, the BWM Convention had 54 contracting states for 53.30% of world gross tonnage. Although new ships constructed after September 8, 2017 must comply on delivery with the BWM Convention, implementation of the BWM Convention has been delayed for existing vessels (constructed prior to September 8, 2017) for a further two years. For such existing vessels, installation of ballast water management systems must take place at the first renewal survey following September 8, 2017 (the date the BWM Convention entered into force). The BWM Convention requires ships to manage ballast water in a manner that removes, renders harmless or avoids the uptake or discharge of aquatic organisms and pathogens within ballast water and sediment. Recently updated Ballast Water and Sediment Management Plan guidance includes more robust testing and performance specifications. The entry of the BWM Convention and revised guidance, as well as similar ballast water treatment requirements in certain jurisdictions (such as the U.S. and states within the U.S.) will likely result in compliance costs relating to the installation of equipment on our vessels to treat ballast water before it is discharged and other additional ballast water management and reporting requirements. Investments in ballast water treatment may have a material adverse effect on our future performance, results of operations, cash flows and financial position.

European Regulations

European regulations in the maritime sector are in general based on international law. However, since the Erika incident in 1999, the EU has become increasingly active in the field of regulation of maritime safety and protection of the environment. It has been the driving force behind a number of amendments of MARPOL (including, for example, changes to accelerate the time-table for the phase-out of single hull tankers, and to prohibit the carriage in such tankers of heavy grades of oil), and if dissatisfied either with the extent of such amendments or with the time-table for their introduction it has been prepared to legislate on a unilateral basis. It should be noted, for instance, that the EU has its own regime as far as ship emissions are concerned and while it does in some respects align with the IMO regime, this is not always the case. As far as sulfur dioxide emissions are concerned, for example, the EU regulation has not just caught up with the IMO limits for sulfur in ECAs, but it continues to have certain elements that exceed IMO regulations (e.g. as of January 1, 2015, EU Member States must ensure that ships in the Baltic, the North Seam and the English Channel are using gas oils with a sulfur content of no more than 0.10%). The EU has adopted legislation that (1) requires member states to refuse access to their ports to certain sub-standard vessels, according to vessel type, flag and number of previous detentions, (2) obliges member states to inspect at least 25% of vessels using their ports annually and provides for increased surveillance of vessels posing a high risk to maritime safety or the marine environment, (3) provides the EU with greater authority and control over classification societies, including the ability to seek to suspend or revoke the authority of negligent societies, and (4) requires member states to impose criminal sanctions for certain pollution events, such as the unauthorized discharge of tank washings. It has also considered legislation that could affect the operation of vessels and the liability of owners for oil pollution. In some instances where it has done so, international regulations have subsequently been amended to the same level of stringency as that introduced in Europe, but the risk is well established that EU regulations may from time to time impose burdens and costs on ship owners and operators which are additional to those involved in complying with international rules and standards. In December 2016, the EU signed into law the National Emissions Ceiling (“NEC”) Directive, which entered into force on December 31, 2016. The NEC must be implemented by individual members states through particular laws in each state by June 30, 2018. The NEC aims to set stricter emissions limits on SO2, ammonia, non-methane volatile organic compounds, NOx and fine particulate (PM2.5) by setting new upper limits for emissions of these pollutants, starting in 2020. While the NEC is not specifically directed toward the shipping industry, the EU specifically mentions the shipping industry in its announcement of the NEC as a contributor to emissions of PM2.5, SO2 and NOx. Implementation of new laws by member states to reduce emissions may ultimately result in increased costs to us to comply with the more stringent standards.

Notably, in 2015 the EU adopted a directive, as amended in 2009, on ship-source pollution, imposing criminal sanctions for pollution not only where this is caused by intent or recklessness (which would be an offense under MARPOL), but also where it is caused by “serious negligence”. The concept of “serious negligence” may be interpreted in practice to be little more than ordinary negligence. The directive could therefore result in criminal liability being incurred in circumstances where it would not be incurred under international law. Criminal liability for a pollution incident could not only result in us incurring substantial penalties or fines but may also, in some jurisdictions, facilitate civil liability claims for greater compensation than would otherwise have been payable.

 

58


Table of Contents

The EU has also recently adopted a regulation that seeks to facilitate the ratification of the IMO Recycling Convention and sets forth rules relating to vessel recycling and management of hazardous materials on vessels. The new regulation contains requirements for the recycling of vessels at approved recycling facilities that must meet certain requirements, so as to minimize the adverse effects of recycling on human health and the environment. The new regulation also contains rules for the control and proper management of hazardous materials on vessels and prohibits or restricts the installation or use of certain hazardous materials on vessels. The new regulation applies to vessels flying the flag of a member state and certain of its provisions apply to vessels flying the flag of a third country calling at a port or anchorage of a member state. For example, when calling at a port or anchorage of a member state, a vessel flying the flag of a third country will be required, among other things, to have on board an inventory of hazardous materials that complies with the requirements of the new regulation and the vessel must be able to submit to the relevant authorities of that member state a copy of a statement of compliance issued by the relevant authorities of the country of the vessel’s flag verifying the inventory. The new regulation is to apply no later than December 31, 2018, although certain of its provisions are to apply at different stages, with certain of them applicable from December 31, 2020. Pursuant to this regulation, the EU has recently published the first version of a European List of approved ship recycling facilities meeting the requirements of the regulation, as well as four further implementing decisions dealing with certification and other administrative requirements set out in the regulation.

In response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon incident, the EU has issued Directive 2013/30/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of June 12, 2013 on safety of offshore oil and gas operations. The objective of this Directive is to reduce as much as possible the occurrence of major accidents relating to offshore oil and gas operations and to limit their consequences, thus increasing the protection of the marine environment and coastal economies against pollution, establishing minimum conditions for safe offshore exploration and exploitation of oil and gas limiting possible disruptions to EU indigenous energy production, and to improve the response mechanisms in case of an accident. Member states must implement the Directive by July 19, 2015. The U.K. has various new or amended regulations such as: the Offshore Petroleum Activities (Offshore Safety Directive) (Environmental Functions) Regulations 2015 (OSDEF), the 2015 amendments to the Merchant Shipping (Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Cooperation Convention) Regulations 1998 (OPRC 1998) and other environmental Directive requirements, specifically the Environmental Management System. The Offshore Petroleum Licensing (Offshore Safety Directive) Regulations 2015 will implement the licensing Directive requirements.

U.S. Environmental Regulations and Laws Governing Civil Liability for Pollution: Environmental legislation in the U.S. merits particular mention as it is in many respects more onerous than international laws, representing a high-water mark of regulation with which ship-owners and operators must comply, and of liability likely to be incurred in the event of non-compliance or an incident causing pollution.

U.S. federal legislation, including notably the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (“OPA 90”), establishes an extensive regulatory and liability regime for the protection and cleanup of the environment from oil spills, including cargo or bunker oil spills from tankers. OPA 90 affects all owners and operators whose vessels trade in the U.S., its territories and possessions or whose vessels operate in U.S. waters, which includes the U.S.’ territorial sea and its 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone. Under OPA 90, vessel owners, operators and bareboat charterers are “responsible parties” and are jointly, severally and strictly liable (unless the spill results solely from the act or omission of a third party, an act of God or an act of war) for all containment and clean-up costs and other damages arising from discharges or substantial threats of discharges, of oil from their vessels. OPA 90 defines these other damages broadly to include:

 

    natural resource damages and the costs of assessment thereof;

 

    real and personal property damage;

 

    net loss of taxes, royalties, rents, fees and other lost revenues;

 

    lost profits or impairment of earning capacity due to property or natural resource damages; and

 

    net cost of public services necessitated by a spill response, such as protection from fire, safety or health hazards, and loss of subsistence use of natural resources.

OPA 90 preserves the right to recover damages under other existing laws, including maritime tort law. In addition to potential liability under OPA as the relevant federal legislation, vessel owners may in some instances incur liability on an even more stringent basis under state law in the particular state where the spillage occurred.

Title VII of the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2004, or the CGMTA, amended OPA 90 to require the owner or operator of any non tank vessel of 400 gross tons or more, that carries oil of any kind as a fuel for main propulsion, including bunkers, to prepare and submit a response plan for each vessel on or before August 8, 2005. The implementing regulations took effect on October 30, 2013. The vessel response plans must include detailed information on actions to be taken by vessel personnel to prevent or mitigate any discharge or substantial threat of such a discharge of ore from the vessel due to operational activities or casualties.

 

59


Table of Contents

OPA 90 liability limits are periodically adjusted for inflation, and the U.S. Coast Guard issued a final rule on November 19, 2015 to reflect increases in the Consumer Price Index. With this adjustment, OPA 90 currently limits liability of the responsible party for single-hull tank vessels over 3,000 gross tons to the greater of $3,500 per gross ton or $25.846 million (this amount is reduced to $7.05 million if the vessel is less than 3,000 gross tons). For tank vessels over 3,000 gross tons, other than a single-hull vessel, liability is limited to $2,200 per gross ton or $18.8 million (or $4.7 million for a vessel less than 3,000 gross tons), whichever is greater. For non-tank vessels, liability is limited to $1,100 per gross ton or $939,800 per incident, whichever is greater. Under OPA 90, these limits of liability do not apply if an incident was directly caused by violation of applicable U.S. federal safety, construction or operating regulations or by a responsible party’s gross negligence or willful misconduct, or if the responsible party fails or refuses to report the incident or to cooperate and assist in connection with oil removal activities.

In response to the Deepwater Horizon incident in the Gulf of Mexico, in 2010 the U.S. Congress proposed, but did not formally adopt legislation to amend OPA 90 to mandate stronger safety standards and increased liability and financial responsibility for offshore drilling operations. While Congressional activity on this topic is expected to continue to focus on offshore facilities rather than on vessels generally, it cannot be known with certainty what form any such new legislative initiatives may take.

In addition, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (“CERCLA”), which applies to the discharge of hazardous substances (other than oil) whether on land or at sea, contains a similar liability regime and provides for cleanup, removal and natural resource damages. CERCLA, as well as certain U.S. state laws that may also apply to petroleum or petroleum products, imposes joint and several liability, without regard to fault, on the owner or operator of a vessel, vehicle or facility from which there has been a release, along with other specified parties. Liability under CERCLA is limited to the greater of $300 per gross ton or $0.5 million for vessels not carrying hazardous substances as cargo or residue, unless the incident is caused by gross negligence, willful misconduct, or a violation of certain regulations, in which case liability is unlimited.

We currently maintain, for each of our owned vessels, insurance coverage against pollution liability risks in the amount of $1.0 billion per incident. The insured risks include penalties and fines as well as civil liabilities and expenses resulting from accidental pollution. However, this insurance coverage is subject to exclusions, deductibles and other terms and conditions. If any liabilities or expenses fall within an exclusion from coverage, or if damages from a catastrophic incident exceed the $1.0 billion limitation of coverage per incident, our cash flow, profitability and financial position could be adversely impacted.

All owners and operators of vessels over 300 gross tons are required to establish and maintain with the U.S. Coast Guard evidence of financial responsibility sufficient to meet their potential liabilities under OPA 90 and CERCLA. Under OPA 90, an owner or operator of a fleet of vessels is required only to demonstrate evidence of financial responsibility in an amount sufficient to cover the vessel in the fleet having the greatest maximum liability under OPA. Under the self-insurance provisions, the ship owner or operator must have a net worth and working capital, measured in assets located in the U.S. against liabilities located anywhere in the world, that exceeds the applicable amount of financial responsibility. We have complied with the U.S. Coast Guard regulations by providing a certificate of responsibility from third party entities that are acceptable to the U.S. Coast Guard evidencing sufficient self-insurance.

The U.S. Coast Guard’s regulations concerning certificates of financial responsibility provide, in accordance with OPA 90, that claimants may bring suit directly against an insurer or guarantor that furnishes certificates of financial responsibility. In the event that such insurer or guarantor is sued directly, it is prohibited from asserting any contractual defense that it may have had against the responsible party and is limited to asserting those defenses available to the responsible party and the defense that the incident was caused by the willful misconduct of the responsible party. Certain organizations, which had typically provided certificates of financial responsibility under pre-OPA 90 laws, including the major protection and indemnity organizations have declined to furnish evidence of insurance for vessel owners and operators if they are subject to direct actions or required to waive insurance policy defenses. This requirement may have the effect of limiting the availability of the type of coverage required by the Coast Guard and could increase our costs of obtaining this insurance as well as the costs of our competitors that also require such coverage.

OPA 90 specifically permits individual states to impose their own liability regimes with regard to oil pollution incidents occurring within their boundaries, and some states’ environmental laws impose unlimited liability for oil spills. For example, California regulations prohibit the discharge of oil, require an oil contingency plan be filed with the state, require that the ship owner contract with an oil response organization and require a valid certificate of financial responsibility, all prior to the vessel entering state waters. In some cases, states, which have enacted such legislation, have not yet issued implementing regulations defining vessels owners’ responsibilities under these laws. We intend to comply with all applicable state regulations in the ports where our vessels call.

 

60


Table of Contents

The U.S. Clean Water Act (“CWA”) prohibits the discharge of oil or hazardous substances in U.S. navigable waters and imposes strict liability in the form of penalties for unauthorized discharges. The CWA also imposes substantial liability for the costs of removal, remediation and damages and complements the remedies available under CERCLA. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) regulates the discharge of ballast water and other substances incidental to the normal operation of vessels in U.S. waters using a Vessel General Permit (“VGP”), system pursuant to the CWA, in order to combat the risk of harmful organisms that can travel in ballast water carried from foreign ports and to minimize the risk of water pollution through numerous specified effluent streams incidental to the normal operation of vessels. Compliance with the conditions of the VGP is required for commercial vessels 79 feet in length or longer (other than commercial fishing vessels). On March 28, 2013, the EPA adopted the 2013 VGP, which took effect on December 19, 2013. The 2013 VGP is valid for five years.

This new 2013 VGP imposes a numeric standard to control the release of non-indigenous invasive species in ballast water discharges. On October 5, 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit found the EPA was arbitrary and capricious in issuing the ballast water provisions of the VGP, finding that the EPA failed to adequately explain why stricter technology-based effluent standards should not be applied. The court instructed the EPA to reconsider these issues but held the 2013 VCP remains in effect until the EPA addresses the issues. If the EPA establishes more stringent numeric standards for ballast water discharges, we may incur costs to modify our vessels to comply with new standards. In addition, through the CWA certification provisions, that allow U.S. states to place additional conditions on the use of the VGP within state waters, a number of states have proposed or implemented a variety of stricter ballast water requirements including, in some states, specific treatment standards. Because the VGP expires at the end of this year, there may be new U.S. federal and state requirements that could require the installation of equipment on our vessels to treat ballast water before it is discharged or the implementation of other port facility disposal arrangements or procedures at potentially substantial cost, and/or otherwise restrict our vessels from entering U.S. waters.

Compliance with new U.S. federal and state requirements could require the installation of equipment on our vessels to treat ballast water before it is discharged or the implementation of other port facility disposal arrangements or procedures at potentially substantial cost, and/or otherwise restrict our vessels from entering U.S. waters. Coast Guard regulations require commercial ships operating in U.S. waters to manage ballast water by meeting certain requirements, which include using a U.S. type-approved Ballast Water Management System (“BWMS”), temporarily using a foreign-type BWMS that has been accepted by the Coast Guard, using ballast water obtained from a U.S. Public Water System, discharging ballast water into a shore-side facility or not discharging ballast water within 12 nautical miles. As of January 1, 2014, vessels are technically subject to the phasing-in of these standards. As a result, the U.S. Coast Guard in the past provided waivers to vessels which could not install the then unapproved ballast water treatment technology, but has begun to deny requests for waivers in light of its recent approval of a handful of technologies. The EPA, on the other hand, has taken a different approach to enforcing ballast discharge standards under the VGP. On December 27, 2013, the EPA issued an enforcement response policy in connection with the new VGP in which the EPA indicated that it would take into account the reasons why vessels do not have the requisite technology installed, but will not grant any waivers.

A number of bills relating to ballast water management have been introduced in the U.S. Congress, but it is difficult to predict which, if any, will be enacted. Several states, including Michigan and California, have adopted legislation or regulations relating to the permitting and management of ballast water discharges. California has extended its ballast water management program to the regulation of “hull fouling” organisms attached to vessels and adopted regulations limiting the number of organisms in ballast water discharges. Other states could adopt similar requirements that could increase the costs of operation in state waters.

The Federal Clean Air Act (“CAA”) requires the EPA to promulgate standards applicable to emissions of volatile organic compounds and other air contaminants. Our vessels are subject to CAA vapor control and recovery standards (“VCS”) for cleaning fuel tanks and conducting other operations in regulated port areas, and to CAA emissions standards for so-called “Category 3” marine diesel engines operating in U.S. waters. In April 2010, EPA adopted regulations implementing the provision of MARPOL Annex VI regarding emissions from Category 3 marine diesel engines. Under these regulations, both U.S. and foreign-flagged ships must comply with the applicable engine and fuel standards of Annex VI, including the stricter North America ECA standards, which took effect in August 2012, when they enter U.S. ports or operate in most internal U.S. waters including the Great Lakes. Annex VI requirements are discussed in greater detail above under “International regulations to prevent pollution from ships.” We may incur costs to install control equipment on our vessels to comply with the new standards.

Also under the CAA, since 1990, the U.S. Coast Guard has regulated the safety of VCSs that are required under EPA and state rules. Our vessels operating in regulated port areas have installed VCSs that are compliant with EPA, state and U.S. Coast Guard requirements. On July 16, 2013, the U.S. Coast Guard adopted regulations that made its VCS requirements more compatible with new EPA and State regulations, reflected changes in VCS technology, and codified existing U.S. Coast Guard guidelines. We intend to comply with all applicable state and U.S. federal regulations in the ports where our vessels call.

 

61


Table of Contents

International laws governing civil liability for oil pollution damage

We operate a fleet of vessels that are subject to national and international laws governing pollution from such vessels. Several international conventions impose and limit pollution liability from vessels. An owner of a tanker vessel carrying a cargo of “persistent oil” as defined by the International Convention for Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage (the “CLC”) is subject under the convention to strict liability for any pollution damage caused in a contracting state by an escape or discharge from cargo or bunker tanks. This liability is subject to a financial limit calculated by reference to the tonnage of the ship, and the right to limit liability may be lost if the spill is caused by the shipowner’s intentional or reckless conduct. Liability may also be incurred under the CLC for a bunker spill from the vessel even when she is not carrying such cargo, but is in ballast.

When a tanker is carrying clean oil products that do not constitute “persistent oil” that would be covered under the CLC, liability for any pollution damage will generally fall outside the CLC and will depend on other international conventions or domestic laws in the jurisdiction where the spillage occurs. The same principle applies to any pollution from the vessel in a jurisdiction, which is not a party to the CLC. The CLC applies in over 100 jurisdictions around the world, but it does not apply in the U.S., where the corresponding liability laws such as the OPA 90 discussed above, are particularly stringent.

For vessel operations not covered by the CLC, in 2001, the IMO adopted the International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage (the “Bunker Convention”), which imposes strict liability on shipowners for pollution damage in jurisdictional waters of ratifying states caused by discharges of “bunker oil.” The Bunker Convention defines “bunker oil” as “any hydrocarbon mineral oil, including lubricating oil, used or intended to be used for the operation or propulsion of the ship, and any residues of such oil.” The Bunker Convention also requires registered owners of ships over a certain size to maintain insurance for pollution damage in an amount equal to the limits of liability under the applicable national or international limitation regime. The Bunker Convention entered into force on November 21, 2008, and as of February 7, 2017, had 83 contracting states. In other jurisdictions, liability for spills or releases of oil from ships’ bunkers continues to be determined by the national or other domestic laws in the jurisdiction where the events or damages occur.

Outside the U.S., national laws generally provide for the owner to bear strict liability for pollution, subject to a right to limit liability under applicable national or international regimes for limitation of liability. The most widely applicable international regime limiting maritime pollution liability is the Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims of 1976 (the “1976 Convention”). Rights to limit liability under the 1976 Convention are forfeited where a spill is caused by a shipowners’ intentional or reckless conduct. Some states have ratified the 1996 LLMC Protocol to the 1976 Convention, which provides for liability limits substantially higher than those set forth in the 1976 Convention to apply in such states. Finally, some jurisdictions are not a party to either the 1976 Convention or the 1996 LLMC Protocol, and, therefore, shipowners’ rights to limit liability for maritime pollution in such jurisdictions may be uncertain.

Other Regional Requirements

The environmental protection regimes in certain other countries, such as Canada, resemble those of the U.S. To the extent we operate in the territorial waters of such countries or enter their ports, our vessels would typically be subject to the requirements and liabilities imposed in such countries. Other regions of the world also have the ability to adopt requirements or regulations that may impose additional obligations on our vessels and may entail significant expenditures on our part and may increase the costs of our operations. These requirements, however, would apply to the industry operating in those regions as a whole and would also affect our competitors. However, it is difficult to predict what legislation, if any, may be promulgated by the U.S., the EU or any other country or authority.

 

62


Table of Contents

Security Regulations

A number of initiatives have been introduced in recent years intended to enhance vessel security. On November 25, 2002, MTSA was signed into law. To implement certain portions of the MTSA, the U.S. Coast Guard issued regulations in July 2003 requiring the implementation of certain security requirements aboard vessels operating in waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. Similarly, in December 2002, amendments to SOLAS created a new chapter of the convention dealing specifically with maritime security. This new chapter came into effect in July 2004 and imposes various detailed security obligations on vessels and port authorities, most of which are contained in the newly created ISPS Code. Among the various requirements are:

 

    on-board installation of automatic information systems to enhance vessel-to-vessel and vessel-to-shore communications;

 

    on-board installation of ship security alert systems;

 

    the development of vessel security plans; and

 

    compliance with flag state security certification requirements.

The U.S. Coast Guard regulations, intended to align with international maritime security standards, exempt non-U.S. vessels from MTSA vessel security measures, provided such vessels have on board a valid “International Ship Security Certificate” that attests to the vessel’s compliance with SOLAS security requirements and the ISPS Code. We have implemented the various security measures required by the IMO, SOLAS and the ISPS Code and have approved ISPS certificates and plans certified by the applicable flag state on board all our vessels.

Classification, Inspection and Maintenance: Every sea going vessel must be “classed” by a classification society. The classification society certifies that the vessel is “in class,” signifying that the vessel has been built and maintained in accordance with the rules of the classification society and complies with applicable rules and regulations of the vessel’s country of registry and the international conventions of which that country is a member. In addition, where surveys are required by international conventions and corresponding laws and ordinances of a flag state, the classification society will undertake them on application or by official order, acting on behalf of the authorities concerned.

The classification society also undertakes, on request, other surveys and checks that are required by regulations and requirements of the flag state. These surveys are subject to agreements made in each individual case or to the regulations of the country concerned. For maintenance of the class, regular and extraordinary surveys of hull, machinery (including the electrical plant) and any special equipment classed are required to be performed as follows:

 

    Annual Surveys: For seagoing ships, annual surveys are conducted for the hull and the machinery (including the electrical plant) and, where applicable, for special equipment classed, at intervals of 12 months from the date of commencement of the class period indicated in the certificate.

 

    Intermediate Surveys: Extended annual surveys are referred to as intermediate surveys and typically are conducted two and a half years after commissioning and each class renewal. Intermediate surveys may be carried out on the occasion of the second or third annual survey.

 

    Class Renewal Surveys: Class renewal surveys, also known as special surveys, are carried out for the ship’s hull, machinery (including the electrical plant), and for any special equipment classed, at the intervals indicated by the character of classification for the hull. At the special survey, the vessel is thoroughly examined, including audio-gauging, to determine the thickness of its steel structure. Should the thickness be found to be less than class requirements, the classification society would prescribe steel renewals. The classification society may grant a one-year grace period for completion of the special survey. Substantial amounts of money may have to be spent for steel renewals to pass a special survey if the vessel experiences excessive wear and tear. In lieu of the special survey every four or five years, depending on whether a grace period was granted, a ship owner has the option of arranging with the classification society for the vessel’s integrated hull or machinery to be on a continuous survey cycle, in which every part of the vessel would be surveyed within a five-year cycle.

 

63


Table of Contents

Risk of Loss and Liability Insurance

General: The operation of any cargo vessel includes risks such as mechanical failure, physical damage, collision, fire, contact with floating objects, property loss, cargo loss or damage, business interruption due to political circumstances in foreign countries, hostilities, and labor strikes. In addition, there is always an inherent possibility of marine disaster, including oil spills and other environmental mishaps, and the liabilities arising from owning and operating vessels in international trade. OPA 90, which imposes virtually unlimited liability upon owners, operators and demise charterers of any vessel trading in the U.S. exclusive economic zone for certain oil pollution accidents in the United States, has made liability insurance more expensive for ship owners and operators trading in the U.S. market. While we believe that our present insurance coverage is adequate, not all risks can be insured, and there can be no guarantee that any specific claim will be paid, or that we will always be able to obtain adequate insurance coverage at reasonable rates. Our current insurance includes the following:

Hull and Machinery and War Risk Insurance: We have marine hull and machinery and war risk insurance, which include coverage of the risk of actual or constructive total loss, for all of our owned vessels. Each of the owned vessels is covered up to at least fair market value, with a deductible of $0.1 million per Panamax, Handymax and Container vessel and $0.2 million per Capesize vessel for the hull and machinery insurance. We have also extended our war risk insurance to include war loss of hire for any loss of time to the vessel, including for physical repairs, caused by a warlike incident and piracy seizure for up to 270 days of detention / loss of time. There are no deductibles for the war risk insurance or the war loss of hire cover.

We have arranged, as necessary, increased value insurance for our vessels. With the increased value insurance, in case of total loss of the vessel, we will be able to recover the sum insured under the increased value policy in addition to the sum insured under the hull and machinery policy. Increased value insurance also covers excess liabilities that are not recoverable in full by the hull and machinery policies by reason of underinsurance. We do not expect to maintain loss of hire insurance for our vessels. Loss of hire insurance covers business interruptions that result in the loss of use of a vessel.

Protection and Indemnity Insurance: Protection and indemnity insurance is expected to be provided by mutual protection and indemnity associations (“P&I Associations”), who indemnify members in respect of discharging their tortious, contractual or statutory third-party legal liabilities arising from the operation of an entered ship. Such liabilities include but are not limited to third-party liability and other related expenses from injury or death of crew, passengers and other third parties, loss or damage to cargo, claims arising from collisions with other vessels, damage to other third-party property, pollution arising from oil or other substances, and salvage, towing and other related costs, including wreck removal. Protection and indemnity insurance is a form of mutual indemnity insurance, extended by protection and indemnity mutual associations and always provided in accordance with the applicable associations’ rules and members’ agreed terms and conditions.

Our fleet is currently entered for protection and indemnity insurance with International Group associations where, in line with all International Group Clubs, coverage for oil pollution is limited to $1.0 billion per event. The 13 P&I Associations that comprise the International Group insure approximately 95% of the world’s commercial tonnage and have entered into a pooling agreement to collectively reinsure each association’s liabilities. Each vessel that we acquire will be entered with P&I Associations of the International Group. Under the International Group reinsurance program for the current policy year, each P&I club in the International Group is responsible for the first $10.0 million of every claim. In every claim the amount in excess of $10.0 million and up to $100.0 million is shared by the clubs under the pooling agreement. Any claim in excess of $100.0 million is reinsured by the International Group in the international reinsurance market under the General Excess of Loss Reinsurance Contract. This policy currently provides an additional $2.0 billion of coverage for non-oil pollution claims. Further to this, an additional reinsurance layer has been placed by the International Group for claims up to $1.0 billion in excess of $2.1 billion, or $3.1 billion in total. For passengers and crew claims, the overall limit is $3.0 billion for any one event on any one vessel with a sub-limit of $2.0 billion for passengers. With the exception of pollution, passenger or crew claims, should any other P&I claim exceed Group reinsurance limits, the provisions of all International Group Club’s overspill claim rules will operate and members of any International Group Club will be liable for additional contributions in accordance with such rules. To date, there has never been an overspill claim, or one even nearing this level.

As a member of the P&I Associations that are members of the International Group, we will be subject to calls payable to the associations based on our individual fleet record, the associations’ overall its claim records as well as the claim records of all other members of the individual associations, and members of the pool of P&I Associations comprising the International Group. The P&I Associations’ policy year commences on February 20th. Calls are levied by means of Estimated Total Premiums (“ETP”) and the amount of the final installment of the ETP varies according to the actual total premium ultimately required by the club for a particular policy year. Members have a liability to pay supplementary calls, which might be levied by the board of directors of the club if the ETP is insufficient to cover amounts paid out by the club. Should a member leave or entry cease with any of the associations, at the Club’s Managers discretion, they may be also be liable to pay release calls or provide adequate security for the same amount. Such calls are levied in respect of potential outstanding Club/Member liabilities on open policy years and include but are not limited to liabilities for deferred calls and supplementary calls.

Uninsured Risks: Not all risks are insured and not all risks are insurable. The principal insurable risks, which nonetheless remain uninsured across our businesses, are “loss of hire”, “strikes,” except in cases of loss of hire due to war or a piracy event, “defense,” and “credit risk. Specifically, we do not insure these risks because the costs are regarded as disproportionate. These

 

64


Table of Contents

insurances provide, subject to a deductible, a limited indemnity for hire that would not be receivable by the shipowner for reasons set forth in the policy. Should a vessel on time charter, where the vessel is paid a fixed hire day by day, suffer a serious mechanical breakdown, the daily hire will no longer be payable by the charterer. The purpose of the loss of hire insurance is to secure the loss of hire during such periods. In the case of strikes insurance, if a vessel is being paid a fixed sum to perform a voyage and the ship becomes strike bound at a loading or discharging port, the insurance covers the loss of earnings during such periods. However, in some cases when a vessel is transiting high risk war and/or piracy areas, we arrange war loss of hire insurance to cover up to 270 days of detention/loss of time. When our charterers engage in legally permitted trading in locations which may still be subject to sanctions or boycott, such as Iran, Syria and Sudan, our insurers may be contractually or by operation of law prohibited from honoring our insurance contract for such trading, which could result in reduced insurance coverage for losses incurred by the related vessels. Furthermore, our insurers and we may be prohibited from posting or otherwise be unable to post security in respect of any incident in such locations, resulting in the loss of use of the relevant vessel and negative publicity for our Company which could negatively impact our business, results of operations, cash flows and share price.

There are no deductibles for the war loss of hire cover. We maintain strike insurance for our port terminal operations.

Even if our insurance coverage is adequate to cover our losses, if we suffer a loss of a vessel, we may not be able to obtain a timely replacement for any lost vessel. Furthermore, in the future, we may not be able to obtain adequate insurance coverage at reasonable rates for our fleet. For example, more stringent environmental regulations have led to increased costs for, and in the future may result in the lack of availability of, insurance against risks of environmental damage or pollution. We may also be subject to calls, or premiums, in amounts based not only on our own claim records but also on the claim records of all other members of the protection and indemnity associations through which we receive indemnity insurance coverage. A catastrophic oil spill or marine disaster could exceed our insurance coverage, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Any uninsured or underinsured loss could harm our business and financial condition. In addition, the insurance may be voidable by the insurers as a result of certain actions, such as vessels failing to maintain required certification.

Risk Management

Risk management in the shipping industry involves balancing a number of factors in a cyclical and potentially volatile environment. Fundamentally, the challenge is to appropriately allocate capital to competing opportunities of owning or chartering vessels. In part, this requires a view of the overall health of the market as well as an understanding of capital costs and returns. Thus, stated simply, one may charter-in part of a fleet as opposed to owning the entire fleet to maximize risk management and economic results. This is coupled with the challenge posed by the complex logistics of ensuring that the vessels controlled by Navios Holdings are fully employed.

Navios Holdings seeks to manage risk through a number of strategies, including vessel control strategies (chartering and ownership), freight carriage and FFA trading. Navios Holdings’ vessel control strategies include seeking the appropriate mix of owned vessels, long- and short-term chartered-in vessels, coupled with purchase options, when available, and spot charters. Navios Holdings also enters into COAs, which gives Navios Holdings, subject to certain limitations, the flexibility to determine the means of getting a particular cargo to its destination.

Legal Proceedings

Navios Holdings is not involved in any legal proceedings that it believes will have a material adverse effect on its business, financial position, results of operations and liquidity.

From time to time, Navios Holdings may be subject to legal proceedings and claims in the ordinary course of business. It is expected that these claims would be covered by insurance if they involved liabilities such as those that arise from a collision, other marine casualty, damage to cargoes, oil pollution and death or personal injuries to crew, subject to customary deductibles. Those claims, even if lacking merit, could result in the expenditure of significant financial and managerial resources.

Refer to “Item 8. Financial Information” in “Legal Proceedings”.

 

65


Table of Contents

Crewing and Shore Employees

Navios Holdings crews its vessels primarily with Greek, Ukrainian, Georgian, Filipino, Polish, Romanian, Indian and Russian officers and Filipino, Georgian, Indian, Romanian, Ethiopian and Ukrainian seamen. Navios Holdings’ fleet manager is responsible for selecting its Greek officers. Other nationalities are referred to Navios Holdings’ fleet manager by local crewing agencies. Navios Holdings is also responsible for travel and payroll of the crew. The crewing agencies handle each seaman’s training. Navios Holdings requires that all of its seamen have the qualifications and licenses required to comply with international regulations and shipping conventions. Navios Logistics crews its fleet with Argentinean, Brazilian and Paraguayan officers and seamen. Navios Logistics’ fleet managers are responsible for selecting the crew.

As of December 31, 2017, with respect to shore-side employees, Navios Holdings and its subsidiaries employed 222 employees in its Piraeus, Greece office, 11 employees in its New York office, seven employees in its Antwerp, Belgium office, three employees in its Monaco office and eight employees in its Singapore office. Navios Logistics employs 50 employees in the Asuncion, Paraguay office, 21 employees at the port facility in San Antonio, Paraguay, 103 employees in the Buenos Aires, Argentina office, eight employees in the Montevideo, Uruguay office, 203 employees at the port facilities in Uruguay, and 10 employees at Hidronave South American Logistics S.A.’s (“Hidronave”) Corumba, Brazil office.

Facilities

Navios Holdings and its affiliates currently lease the following properties:

 

  Navios Shipmanagement Inc. and Navios Corporation lease approximately 3,882.3 square meters of space at 85 Akti Miaouli, Piraeus, Greece, pursuant to one lease agreement that continues to be effective until either party terminates the agreement and other lease agreements that expire in 2019.

 

  Kleimar N.V. leases approximately 632 square meters for its offices, in Antwerp, Belgium, pursuant to a lease that expires in 2019.

 

  Navios Corporation leases approximately 16,703 square feet of space at 825 Third Avenue, New York, New York, pursuant to a lease that expires in 2019. Navios Holdings sublets a portion of the 34th floor in the building located at 825 Third Avenue, New York, New York, which premises comprise a portion of the premises under the main lease, to a third party pursuant a sub-lease that expires in 2019.

 

  Navios Tankers Management Inc. leases approximately 253.75 square meters of space at 85 Akti Miaouli, Piraeus, Greece, pursuant to a lease agreement signed October 29, 2010 and expiring in 2019.

 

  Navios Shipmanagement Inc., Navios Maritime Holdings Inc., and Navios Tankers Management Inc. lease office space in Monaco pursuant to a lease that expires in June 2018.

Navios Logistics and its subsidiaries currently lease, (or occupy as free zone users, as the case may be), the following premises:

 

  CNSA, as a free zone direct user at the Nueva Palmira Free Zone, holds the right to occupy the land on which it operates its port and transfer facilities, located at Zona Franca, Nueva Palmira, Uruguay. CNSA was authorized to operate as a free zone user on November 29, 1955 by a resolution of the Executive, who on September 27, 1956 approved an agreement, as required by applicable law at the time. On December 4, 1995, CNSA’s rights as a direct user were renewed in a single free zone user agreement, which was subsequently amended on multiple occasions, incorporating new plots of land until its final version dated March 4, 2016. The agreement currently in force permits CNSA to install and operate a transfer station to handle and store goods, and to build and operate a plant to receive, prepare and dry grain, iron ore, minerals and all types of liquid cargo on land in the Nueva Palmira Free Zone. The agreement expires on March 3, 2046, with a 20-year extension at Navios Logistics’ option, until 2066. Navios Logistics pays a fixed annual fee of approximately $0.3 million, payable over eight consecutive months beginning in January of each year and increasing yearly in proportion to the variation in the U.S. Consumer Price Index corresponding to the previous year. There is also a transhipment fee of $0.20 per ton transshipped until December 31, 2017 and of $0.25 per ton transshipped thereafter. Navios Logistics has certain obligations with respect to improving the land subject to the agreement, and the agreement is terminable by the Free Zone Division if it breaches the terms of the agreement, or labor laws and social security contributions, and if it commits illegal acts or acts expressly forbidden by the agreement. In March 2013, CNSA acquired Enresur, a Nueva Palmira Free Zone direct user, and in December 2014, Navios Logistics acquired Cartisur and Edolmix, both also Nueva Palmira Free Zone direct users. On March 4, 2016, the lands pertaining to Cartisur were assigned to CNSA.

 

  CNSA also leases approximately 400 square meters of space at Paraguay 2141, Montevideo, Uruguay, pursuant to a lease that expires in November 2020.

 

66


Table of Contents
  Compania Naviera Horamar S.A. leases approximately 409 square meters at Cepeda 429 Street, San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina, pursuant to a lease agreement that expires in November 2020.

 

  Petrolera San Antonio S.A. leases approximately 10,481 square meters of a land and a small warehouse next to the river Paraguay at San Miguel district of Asunción over the way to the Club Mbigua, pursuant to a lease agreement that expires in June 2018.

 

  Compania Naviera Horamar S.A. leases a piece of land called “La Misteriosa” in an Island in the Province of Entre Rios, Argentina, Department of Islands of Ibicuy and Paranacito, pursuant to a lease agreement that expires in May 2018.

 

  Compania Naviera Horamar S.A. leases approximately 1,370 square meters of office space at Av. Juana Manso 205, Buenos Aires, Argentina, pursuant to a lease agreement that expires in June 2021.

 

  Merco Par S.A.C.I. leases approximately 655 square meters of office space at Avenida Aviadores del Chaco No 1.669 corner San Martín, Asuncion, Paraguay, pursuant to a lease agreement that expires in November 2018.

 

  Merco Par S.A.C.I. leases some premises alongside the River Paraguay from Relámpago Servicios Import Export S.A. for docking purposes. This property has 380 meters of costal line, by 40 meters of front on the Paraguay River in Bañado Norte, Municipality of Blanco Cue, Asunción District, in Paraguay. The lease is valid until July 2018 and it is automatically renewable for two years.

 

  Petrolera San Antonio S.A: leases some premises alongside the Paraguay River from Ingeniería Naval Especializada S.R.L. (INAVE), located on Blanco Cué. The lease is valid until June 2018.

CNSA owns premises in Montevideo, Uruguay. This space is approximately 112 square meters and is located at Juan Carlos Gomez 1445, Oficina 701, Montevideo 1100, Uruguay.

Petrolera San Antonio S.A. owns the premises from which it operates in Avenida San Antonio, Paraguay. This space is approximately 146,744 square meters and is located between Avenida San Antonio and Virgen de Caacupe, San Antonio, Paraguay.

Compania Naviera Horamar S.A. owns two storehouses located at 880 Calle California, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina and at 791/795 Calle General Daniel Cerri, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina of approximately 259 and 825 square meters, respectively. Compania Naviera Horamar S.A. also owns approximately 1,208 square meters of office space located in 846 Avenida Santa Fe, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Petrovia Internacional S.A. owns three plots of land in Nueva Palmira, Uruguay, two of approximately 29 acres each and one of 23 acres.

C. Organizational structure

Navios Holdings and/or its subsidiaries maintain offices in Monaco, Piraeus, Greece, Antwerp, Belgium, New York and Singapore. Commercial ship management, risk management, operation and technical management of Navios Holdings’ owned vessels are conducted through wholly-owned subsidiaries of Navios Holdings. Navios Logistics maintains offices in Montevideo, Uruguay, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Asuncion, Paraguay, and Corumba, Brazil. Navios Logistics conducts the commercial and technical management of its vessels, barges and pushboats through its wholly-owned subsidiaries. Navios Logistics holds the rights to operate the ports and transfer facilities in Nueva Palmira indirectly through its Uruguayan subsidiary, CNSA, and owns the San Antonio port facility through its Paraguayan subsidiary, Petrosan.

As of December 31, 2017, all subsidiaries included in the consolidated financial statements are 100% owned, except for Navios Logistics and its subsidiaries, which is 63.8% owned by Navios Holdings.

 

67


Table of Contents

The table below sets forth Navios Holdings’ corporate structure as of December 31, 2017.

Subsidiaries included in the consolidation:

 

          Ownership     Country of    Statement of Operations

Company Name

   Nature    Interest     Incorporation    2017    2016    2015

Navios Maritime Holdings Inc.

   Holding Company      Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Navios Corporation

   Sub-Holding Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Navios International Inc.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Navimax Corporation

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Navios Handybulk Inc.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Hestia Shipping Ltd

   Operating Company      100   Malta    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Anemos Maritime Holdings Inc.

   Sub-Holding Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Navios Shipmanagement Inc.

   Management Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

NAV Holdings Limited

   Sub-Holding Company      100   Malta    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Kleimar N.V.

   Operating Company/

Vessel Owning Company/

Management Company

     100   Belgium    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Kleimar Ltd.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Bulkinvest S.A.

   Operating Company      100   Luxembourg    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Primavera Shipping Corporation

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Ginger Services Co.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Aquis Marine Corp.

   Sub-Holding Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Navios Tankers Management Inc.

   Management Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Astra Maritime Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Achilles Shipping Corporation

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Apollon Shipping Corporation

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Herakles Shipping Corporation

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Hios Shipping Corporation

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Ionian Shipping Corporation

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Kypros Shipping Corporation

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Meridian Shipping Enterprises Inc.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Mercator Shipping Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Arc Shipping Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Horizon Shipping Enterprises Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Magellan Shipping Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Aegean Shipping Corporation

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Star Maritime Enterprises Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Corsair Shipping Ltd.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Rowboat Marine Inc.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Beaufiks Shipping Corporation

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Nostos Shipmanagement Corp.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Portorosa Marine Corp.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Shikhar Ventures S.A.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Liberia    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Sizzling Ventures Inc.

   Operating Company      100   Liberia    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Rheia Associates Co.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Taharqa Spirit Corp.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Rumer Holding Ltd.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Pharos Navigation S.A.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Pueblo Holdings Ltd

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Quena Shipmanagement Inc.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Aramis Navigation Inc.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

White Narcissus Marine S.A.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Panama    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Navios GP L.L.C.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Red Rose Shipping Corp.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Highbird Management Inc.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Ducale Marine Inc.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Vector Shipping Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Faith Marine Ltd.

   Vessel Owning Company      100   Liberia    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Navios Maritime Finance (US) Inc.

   Operating Company      100   Delaware    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Navios Maritime Finance II (US) Inc.

   Operating Company      100   Delaware    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Tulsi Shipmanagement Co.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Cinthara Shipping Ltd.

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

Rawlin Services Company

   Operating Company      100   Marshall Is.    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31    1/1 - 12/31

 

68


Table of Contents

Mauve International S.A.

   Operating Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31  

Serenity Shipping Enterprises Inc.

   Vessel Owning Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31  

Mandora Shipping Ltd

   Vessel Owning Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31  

Solange Shipping Ltd.

   Vessel Owning Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31  

Diesis Ship Management Ltd

   Operating Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31  

Navios Holdings Europe Finance Inc.

   Sub-Holding Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31  

Navios Asia LLC

   Sub-Holding Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31  

Iris Shipping Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31  

Jasmine Shipping Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31  

Emery Shipping Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31  

Lavender Shipping Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31  

Esmeralda Shipping Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/12 - 12/31        —    

Triangle Shipping Corporation

   Vessel Owning Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/12 - 12/31        —    

Roselite Shipping Corporation

   Operating Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        10/9 - 12/31  

Smaltite Shipping Corporation

   Operating Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        1/1 - 12/31        10/9 - 12/31  

Motiva Trading Ltd

   Operating Company      100     Marshall Is.        1/1 - 12/31        11/2 - 12/31        —    

Alpha Merit Corporation

   Sub-Holding Company      100     Marshall Is.        11/3 - 12/31        —          —    

Thalassa Marine S.A.

   Operating Company      100     Marshall Is.        12/15 - 12/31        —          —    

Affiliates included in the financial statements accounted for under the equity method:

In the consolidated financial statements of Navios Holdings, the following entities are included as affiliates and are accounted for under the equity method for such periods: (i) Navios Partners and its subsidiaries (ownership interest as of December 31, 2017 was 20.8%, which includes a 2.0% general partner interest); (ii) Navios Acquisition and its subsidiaries (economic interest as of December 31, 2017 was 46.2%); (iii) Acropolis (economic interest as of December 31, 2017 was 35.0%); (iv) Navios Europe I and its subsidiaries (economic interest as of December 31, 2017 was 47.5%); Navios Europe II and its subsidiaries (economic interest as of December 31, 2017 was 47.5%); and Navios Containers Inc. and its subsidiaries (economic interest as of December 31, 2017 was 3.4%).

D. Property, plants and equipment

Our only material property is the owned vessels, tanker vessels, barges and pushboats and the port terminal facilities in Paraguay and Uruguay. See “Item 4.B Business Overview” above.

Item 4A. Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects

The following is a discussion of Navios Holdings’ financial condition and results of operations for each of the fiscal years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015. Navios Holdings’ financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles in the United States of America (U.S. GAAP). You should read this section together with the consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes to those financial statements, which are included in this document.

This report contains forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements are based on Navios Holdings’ current expectations and observations. Included among the factors that, in our view, could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements contained in this report are those discussed under “Risk Factors” and “Forward-Looking Statements”.

Overview

Navios Holdings is a global, vertically integrated seaborne shipping and logistics company focused on the transport and transshipment of dry bulk commodities, including iron ore, coal and grain. Navios Holdings technically and commercially manages its owned fleet, Navios Acquisition’s fleet, Navios Partners’ fleet, Navios Midstream’s fleet, Navios Europe I’s fleet Navios Europe II’s fleet and Navios Containers’ fleet, and commercially manages its chartered-in fleet.

On February 2, 2007, Navios Holdings acquired all of the outstanding share capital of Kleimar N.V. (“Kleimar”). Kleimar is a Belgian maritime transportation company established in 1993. Kleimar is the owner and operator of Capesize, Panamax and Handymax vessels used in the transportation of cargoes and has an extensive COA business.

 

69


Table of Contents

Navios Logistics, a consolidated subsidiary of Navios Holdings, is one of the largest logistics companies in the Hidrovia region river system, the main navigable river system in the region, and on the cabotage trades along the eastern coast of South America, serving its customers in the Hidrovia region through three port storage and transfer facilities, one for agricultural, forest-related exports, one for mineral-related exports and the other for refined petroleum products. Navios Logistics complements its three port terminals with a diverse fleet of 338 barges and pushboats and eight vessels, including six oceangoing tankers, one bunker vessel and one river and estuary tanker to be delivered which operate in its cabotage business. Navios Holdings currently owns 63.8% of Navios Logistics.

On August 7, 2007, Navios Holdings formed Navios Partners under the laws of Marshall Islands. Navios G.P. L.L.C. (“General Partner”), a wholly owned subsidiary of Navios Holdings, was also formed on that date to act as the general partner of Navios Partners and received a 2.0% general partner interest in Navios Partners. Navios Partners is an affiliate and not consolidated under Navios Holdings.

On May 28, 2010, Navios Holdings acquired control over Navios Acquisition. As a result, Navios Holdings concluded a business combination had occurred and consolidated the results of Navios Acquisition from that date until March 30, 2011. From March 30, 2011, Navios Acquisition has been considered as an affiliate entity of Navios Holdings. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Holdings’ ownership of the outstanding voting stock of Navios Acquisition was 42.9% and its economic interest in Navios Acquisition was 46.2%.

On October 9, 2013, Navios Holdings, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners established Navios Europe I and have economic interests of 47.5%, 47.5% and 5.0%, respectively, and effective November 2014 voting interests of 50%, 50% and 0%, respectively.

On October 13, 2014, Navios Acquisition formed Navios Midstream under the laws of the Marshall Islands. Midstream General Partner, a wholly owned subsidiary of Navios Acquisition, was also formed on that date to act as the general partner of Navios Midstream and received a 2.0% general partner interest in Navios Midstream. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Acquisition had 59.0% economic interest and Navios Holdings had indirect economic interest of 27.2% (through its ownership in Navios Acquisition) and no direct equity interest.

On February 18, 2015, Navios Holdings, Navios Acquisition and Navios Partners established Navios Europe II and have economic interests of 47.5%, 47.5% and 5.0%, respectively and voting interests of 50%, 50% and 0%, respectively.

On June 8, 2017, Navios Containers completed a private placement and Navios Holdings invested $5.0 million. Navios Containers registered its shares on the Norwegian Over-The-Counter Market (N-OTC) on June 12, 2017 under the ticker “NMCI”. On August 29, 2017 and on November 9, 2017, Navios Containers closed its additional private placements. As of December 31, 2017, Navios Holdings owned 3.4% of Navios Containers’ common stock and warrants, representing 1.7% of the equity of Navios Containers.

Charter Policy and Industry Outlook

Navios Holdings’ policy has been to take a portfolio approach to managing operating risks. This policy may lead Navios Holdings to time charter-out many of the vessels that it is operating (i.e., vessels owned by Navios Holdings or which Navios Holdings has taken into its fleet under charters having a duration of more than 12 months) for long-term periods to various shipping industry counterparties considered by Navios Holdings to have appropriate credit profiles. By doing this, Navios Holdings aims to lock in, subject to credit and operating risks, favorable forward revenue and cash flows, which it believes, will cushion it against unfavorable market conditions, when the Company deems necessary. In addition, Navios Holdings trades additional vessels taken in on shorter term charters of less than 12 months duration as well as voyage charters or COAs.

Generally, this chartering policy may have the effect of generating Time Charter Equivalents (“TCE”) that are higher than spot employment. The average daily charter-in vessel cost for the Navios Holdings long-term charter-in fleet (excluding vessels, which are utilized to serve voyage charters or COAs) was $12,586 per day for the year ended December 31, 2017. The average long-term charter-in hire rate per vessel was included in the amount of long-term hire included elsewhere in this document and was computed by (a) multiplying (i) the daily charter-in rate for each vessel by (ii) the number of days each vessel is in operation for the year; (b) summing those individual multiplications; and (c) dividing such total by the total number of charter-in vessel days for the year. Furthermore, Navios Holdings has the ability to increase its owned fleet through purchase options exercisable in the future at favorable prices relative to the then-current market.

Navios Holdings believes that a decrease in global commodity demand from its current level, and the delivery of dry bulk carrier new buildings into the world fleet, could have an adverse impact on future revenue and profitability. However, Navios Holdings believes that the operating cost advantage of its owned vessels and long-term chartered fleet will continue to help mitigate the impact of any declines in freight rates. A reduced freight rate environment also has an adverse impact on the value of Navios Holdings’ owned fleet. In reaction to a decline in freight rates, available ship financing can also be negatively impacted.

 

70


Table of Contents

Navios Logistics owns and operates vessels, barges and pushboats located mainly in Argentina, the largest independent bulk transfer and storage port facility in Uruguay, and an upriver liquid port facility located in Paraguay. Operating results for Navios Logistics are highly correlated to: (i) South American grain production and export, in particular Argentinean, Brazilian, Paraguayan, Uruguayan and Bolivian production and export; (ii) South American iron ore production and export, mainly from Brazil; and (iii) sales (and logistic services) of petroleum products in the Argentine and Paraguayan markets. Navios Holdings believes that the continuing development of these businesses will foster throughput growth and therefore increase revenues at Navios Logistics. Should this development be delayed, grain harvests be reduced, or the market experience an overall decrease in the demand for grain or iron ore, the operations in Navios Logistics could be adversely affected.

Fleet

The following is the current “core fleet” employment profile (excluding Navios Logistics). The current “core fleet” consists of 71 vessels totaling 7.2 million deadweight tons and has an average age of 7.7 years, assuming basis delivered fleet. The employment profile of the fleet as of March 26, 2018 is reflected in the tables below. Navios Holdings has currently chartered-out 76.8% of available days for 2018, out of which 41.4% on fixed rate and 35.4% on index or profit sharing. Although the fees as presented below are based on contractual charter rates, any contract is subject to performance by the counterparties and us. Additionally, the level of these fees would decrease depending on the vessels’ off-hire days to perform periodic maintenance.

Owned Vessels

 

Vessels

   Type    Built      DWT      Charter-
out
Rate (1)
    

Profit Share

   Expiration
Date (2)
 

Navios Serenity

   Handysize      2011        34,690        7,125      No      04/2018  

Navios Achilles

   Ultra Handymax      2001        52,063        8,313      No      05/2018  

Navios Vector

   Ultra Handymax      2002        50,296        10,450      No      01/2019  

Navios Meridian

   Ultra Handymax      2002        50,316        10,450      No      09/2018  

Navios Mercator

   Ultra Handymax      2002        53,553        9,928      No      12/2018  

Navios Arc

   Ultra Handymax      2003        53,514        5,035      No      04/2018  

Navios Hios

   Ultra Handymax      2003        55,180        10,355    No      01/2019  

Navios Kypros

   Ultra Handymax      2003        55,222       

11,075

—  


 

  

No

100% of average 52 Baltic Supramax Index Routes

    

04/2018

01/2019

 

 

Navios Astra

   Ultra Handymax      2006        53,468        9,738      No      10/2018  

Navios Ulysses

   Ultra Handymax      2007        55,728        9,405    No      04/2018  

Navios Celestial

   Ultra Handymax      2009        58,063        —        97.5% of average 58 Baltic Supramax Index Routes      01/2019  

Navios Vega

   Ultra Handymax      2009        58,792       

10,873

—  

 

 

  

No

97.5% of average 58 Baltic Supramax Index Routes

    

04/2018

12/2018

 

 

Navios Magellan

   Panamax      2000        74,333        11,163      No      07/2018  

Navios Star

   Panamax      2002        76,662        —        100% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes less $2,488/day      12/2018  

Navios Northern Star

   Panamax      2005        75,395        9,738      No      04/2018  

Navios Amitie

   Panamax      2005        75,395        —        100% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes less $2,488/day      12/2018  

Navios Taurus

   Panamax      2005        76,596        11,020      No      06/2018  

Navios Asteriks

   Panamax      2005        76,801        —        100% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes less $2,488/day      11/2018  

N Amalthia

   Panamax      2006        75,318        —        100% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes less $2,488/day      12/2018  

Navios Galileo

   Panamax      2006        76,596        —        100% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes less $2,488/day      12/2018  

N Bonanza

   Panamax      2006        76,596        —        100% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes less $2,488/day      11/2018  

Navios Avior

   Panamax      2012        81,355        10,925      No      06/2018  

 

71


Table of Contents

Navios Centaurus

   Panamax      2012        81,472        —        110% of average Panamax Index 4TC Routes less adjustment to be based on index formula      12/2018  

Navios Sphera

   Panamax      2016        84,872       

12,076

—  

 

 

  

No

123% of average Panamax Index 4TC Routes less adjustment to be based on index formula

    

04/2018

01/2019

 

 

Vessels

   Type    Built      DWT      Charter-
out
Rate (1)
    

Profit Share

   Expiration
Date (2)
 

Navios Equator Prosper

   Capesize      2000        171,191       

9,064

—  

 

 

  

No

117.5% Weighted Average Baltic Capesize 5TC Index Routes

    

04/2018

03/2019

 

 

Navios Stellar

   Capesize      2009        169,001        —        102% Weighted Average Baltic Capesize 5TC Index Routes      01/2020  

Navios Bonavis

   Capesize      2009        180,022        17,391      No      04/2018  

Navios Happiness

   Capesize      2009        180,022        —       

106% Weighted Average

Baltic Capesize 5TC Index Routes

     04/2018  

Navios Phoenix

   Capesize      2009        180,242       

14,345

—  

 

 

  

No

107.5% Weighted Average Baltic Capesize 5TC Index Routes

    

04/2018

12/2018

 

 

Navios Lumen

   Capesize      2009        180,661       

11,741

18,858

 

 

  

No

No

    

04/2018

01/2019

 

 

Navios Antares

   Capesize      2010        169,059       

9,399

—  

 

 

  

No

102% Weighted Average Baltic Capesize 5TC Index Routes

    

04/2018

01/2020

 

 

Navios Etoile

   Capesize      2010        179,234        9,025      No      04/2018  

Navios Bonheur

   Capesize      2010        179,259        17,391      No      04/2018  

Navios Altamira

   Capesize      2011        179,165        —        101% Weighted Average Baltic Capesize 5TC Index Routes      01/2019  

Navios Azimuth

   Capesize      2011        179,169        14,725      No      04/2018  

Navios Ray

   Capesize      2012        179,515       

9,267

—  

 

 

  

No

$4,500 + 52% Weighted Average Baltic Capesize 5TC Index Routes

    

04/2018

04/2018

 

 

Navios Gem

   Capesize      2014        181,336        20,045      No      12/2018  

Navios Mars

   Capesize      2016        181,259        —        117.5% Weighted Average Baltic Capesize 5TC Index Routes      02/2019  

 

72


Table of Contents

Long-term Chartered-in Vessels

The average daily charter-in rate for the active long-term charter-in vessels (excluding vessels which are utilized to fulfil COAs) for 2018 is estimated at $12,852/day. We estimate the days of the long-term charter-in vessels (excluding vessels which are utilized to fulfill COAs) for the next nine months of 2018 are 8,848 days.

 

Vessels

   Type    Built      DWT      Purchase
Option (3)
    Charter-out
Rate (1)
    Expiration
Date (2)
 

Navios Lyra

   Handysize      2012        34,718        Yes (4)      8,241       03/2018  

Navios Primavera

   Ultra Handymax      2007        53,464        Yes       9,975       08/2018  

Mercury Ocean

   Ultra Handymax      2008        53,452        No       9,500       11/2018  

Kouju Lily

   Ultra Handymax      2011        58,872        No       8,740       07/2018  

Navios Oriana

   Ultra Handymax      2012        61,442        Yes       —   (6)      06/2018  

Navios Mercury

   Ultra Handymax      2013        61,393        Yes       —   (7)      12/2018  

Navios Venus

   Ultra Handymax      2015        61,339        Yes      

9,025

—  

 

(6) 

   

04/2018

01/2019

 

 

Osmarine

   Panamax      2006        76,000        No       12,730       04/2018  

Navios Aldebaran

   Panamax      2008        76,500        Yes       13,775       02/2019  

KM Imabari

   Panamax      2009        76,619        No       12,326       04/2018  

Navios Marco Polo

   Panamax      2011        80,647        Yes       —   (8)      08/2018  

Navios Southern Star

   Panamax      2013        82,224        Yes      

16,346

—  

 

(9) 

   

04/2018

04/2019

 

 

Sea Victory

   Panamax      2014        77,095        Yes       —   (10)      11/2018  

Navios Amber

   Panamax      2015        80,994        Yes      

11,589

—  

 

(11) 

   

04/2018

01/2019

 

 

Navios Sky

   Panamax      2015        82,056        Yes      

11,473

—  

 

(12) 

   

04/2018

03/2019

 

 

Navios Coral

   Panamax      2016        84,904        Yes       —   (13)      01/2018  

Navios Citrine

   Panamax      2017        81,626        Yes       9,500       09/2018  

Navios Dolphin

   Panamax      2017        81,630        Yes       10,450       09/2018  

Elsa S

   Panamax      2015        80,954        No      

11,358

—  

 

(14) 

   

06/2018

01/2021

 

 

Pacific Explorer

   Capesize      2007        177,000        No       —   (15)      12/2018  

King Ore

   Capesize      2010        176,800        Yes         —    

Navios Koyo

   Capesize      2011        181,415        Yes      

11,931

—  

 

(16) 

   

04/2018

02/2019

 

 

Navios Obeliks

   Capesize      2012        181,415        Yes         —    

Dream Canary

   Capesize      2015        180,528        Yes       13,300       03/2019  

Dream Coral

   Capesize      2015        181,249        Yes       14,013       03/2019  

Navios Felix

   Capesize      2016        181,221        Yes       —   (17)      01/2019  

 

73


Table of Contents

Long-term Chartered-in Fleet to be delivered

 

Vessels

   Type    Delivery
Date
     DWT      Purchase
Option (3)
    Expiration
Date
 

TBN (18)

   Panamax      April 2018        82,000        No       12/2020  

TBN (19)

   Panamax      May 2018        82,000        No       03/2021  

TBN

   Panamax      Q4 2018        81,500        No (5)      Q3 2023  

TBN

   Panamax      Q1 2019        81,500        No (5)      Q4 2023  

Long-term Bareboat Chartered-in Fleet to be delivered

 

Vessels

   Type    Delivery
Date
     DWT      Purchase
Option (3)
     Expiration
Date
 

TBN

   Panamax      Q4 2019        82,000        Yes        Q4 2029  

TBN

   Panamax      Q1 2020        82,000        Yes        Q4 2029  

TBN

   Panamax      Q4 2019        82,000        Yes        Q1 2030  

 

(1) Daily rate net of commissions.
(2) Expected redelivery basis midpoint of full redelivery period.
(3) Generally, Navios Holdings may exercise its purchase option after three to five years of service.
(4) Navios Holdings holds the initial 50% purchase option on the vessel.
(5) Navios Holdings has the right of first refusal and profit share on sale of vessel.
(6) 110% of average Baltic Supramax 52 Index Routes.
(7) 110% of average Baltic Supramax 58 10TC Index Routes.
(8) 113% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes less adjustment to be based on index formula.
(9) 113.75% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes.
(10) 114% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes less $2,488/day.
(11) 120% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes less adjustment to be based on index formula.
(12) 115% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes less adjustment to be based on index formula.
(13) 118% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes.
(14) 115% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes.
(15) 103% of average Baltic Capesize Index 5TC Routes.
(16) 112% of average Baltic Capesize Index 5TC Routes.
(17) 120% of weighted average Baltic Capesize Index 5TC Routes.
(18) Chartered-out at $11,358/day up to 06/2018, then 115% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes up to 03/2021.
(19) Chartered-out rate at $11,358/day up to 06/2018, then 115% of average Baltic Panamax Index 4TC Routes up to 05/2021.

Recent Developments

In January 2018, Navios Holdings agreed to charter-in, under two ten-year bareboat contracts, from an unrelated third party two newbuilding bulk carriers of about 82,000 dwt per vessel, expected to be delivered in the fourth quarter of 2019 and the first quarter of 2020 respectively. Navios Holdings has agreed to pay in total $11.1 million, representing a deposit for the option to acquire these vessels, of which $5.6 million was paid upon signing of the contracts. The average charter-in rate per day amounts to $5,700 and $5,564 respectively.

In February 2018, Navios Holdings acquired from an unrelated third party, a previously chartered-in vessel, Navios Equator Prosper, a 2000 built, 171,191 dwt vessel, for a total acquisition price of $10.0 million paid in cash.

On February 21, 2018, Navios Partners announced that it has closed an offering of 18,422,000 common units, which includes the sale of $5.0 million of common units to Navios Holdings, at $1.90 per common unit. In addition, Navios Holdings paid $0.7 million to retain its 2% general partnership interest. Following the closing of this offering, Navios Holdings owns a 20.2% interest in Navios Partners, including the 2% general partnership interest.

In March 2018, Navios Holdings completed the sale to an unrelated third party the Navios Herakles, a 2000 built, 52,061 dwt vessel, for a total net sale price of $7.7 million paid in cash. The impairment loss due to the sale amounted to $6.7 million.

 

74


Table of Contents

On March 13, 2018, Navios Containers announced that it has closed a private placement of 5,454,546 common shares at a subscription price of $5.50 per common share. Navios Holdings invested $0.5 million in the private placement and currently owns 3.2% of the outstanding share capital of Navios Containers. In addition, Navios Holdings received warrants, with a five-year term, for 1.7% of the newly issued equity.

Navios Acquisition

On March 27, 2018, Navios Holdings received $1.5 million from Navios Acquisition representing the cash dividend for the fourth quarter of 2017.

In February 2018, the Board of Directors of Navios Acquisition authorized a stock repurchase program for up to $25.0 million of Navios Acquisition’s common stock, for two years. Stock repurchases will be made from time to time for cash in open market transactions at prevailing market prices or in privately negotiated transactions. As of March 31, 2018, Navios Acquisition has repurchased 5,166,544 shares of common stock for a total cost of approximately $4.2 million. Following these repurchases and as of March 31, 2018, Navios Holdings’ ownership of the outstanding voting stock and economic interest in Navios Acquisition was 44.4% and 47.7%, respectively.

A. Operating Results

Factors Affecting Navios Holdings’ Results of Operations:

Navios Holdings actively manages the risk in its operations by: (i) operating the vessels in its fleet in accordance with all applicable international standards of safety and technical ship management; (ii) enhancing vessel utilization and profitability through an appropriate mix of long-term charters complemented by spot charters (time charters for short-term employment) and COAs; (iii) monitoring the financial impact of corporate exposure from both physical and FFAs transactions; (iv) monitoring market and counterparty credit risk limits; (v) adhering to risk management and operation policies and procedures; and (vi) requiring counterparty credit approvals.

Navios Holdings believes that the important measures for analyzing trends in its results of operations include the following:

 

    Market Exposure: Navios Holdings manages the size and composition of its fleet by seeking a mix between chartering and owning vessels in order to adjust to anticipated changes in market rates. Navios Holdings aims to achieve an appropriate balance between owned vessels and long and short-term chartered-in vessels and controls approximately 6.7 million dwt in dry bulk tonnage. Navios Holdings’ options to extend the charter duration of vessels it has under long-term time charter (durations of over 12 months) and its purchase options on chartered vessels permit Navios Holdings to adjust the cost and the fleet size to correspond to market conditions.

 

    Available days: Available days are the total number of days a vessel is controlled by a company less the aggregate number of days that the vessel is off-hire due to scheduled repairs or repairs under guarantee, vessel upgrades or special surveys. The shipping industry uses available days to measure the number of days in a period during which vessels should be capable of generating revenues.

 

    Operating days: Operating days are the number of available days in a period less the aggregate number of days that the vessels are off-hire due to any reason, including lack of demand or unforeseen circumstances. The shipping industry uses operating days to measure the aggregate number of days in a period during which vessels actually generate revenues.

 

    Fleet utilization: Fleet utilization is obtained by dividing the number of operating days during a period by the number of available days during the period. The shipping industry uses fleet utilization to measure a company’s efficiency in finding suitable employment for its vessels and minimizing the amount of days that its vessels are off-hire for reasons other than scheduled repairs or repairs under guarantee, vessel upgrades, special surveys or vessel positioning.

 

    TCE rates: TCE rates are defined as voyage and time charter revenues less voyage expenses during a period divided by the number of available days during the period. The TCE rate is a standard shipping industry performance measure used primarily to compare daily earnings generated by vessels on time charters with daily earnings generated by vessels on voyage charters, because charter hire rates for vessels on voyage charters are generally not expressed in per day amounts, while charter hire rates for vessels on time charters generally are expressed in such amounts.

 

    Equivalent vessels: Equivalent vessels are defined as the available days of the fleet divided by the number of the calendar days in the period.

 

75


Table of Contents

Voyage and Time Charter

Revenues are driven primarily by the number and type of vessels in the fleet, the number of days during which such vessels operate and the amount of daily charter hire rates that the vessels earn under charters, which, in turn, are affected by a number of factors, including:

 

    the duration of the charters;

 

    the level of spot market rates at the time of charters;

 

    decisions relating to vessel acquisitions and disposals;

 

    the amount of time spent positioning vessels;

 

    the amount of time that vessels spend in drydock undergoing repairs and upgrades;

 

    the age, condition and specifications of the vessels; and

 

    the aggregate level of supply and demand in the dry bulk shipping industry.

Time charters are available for varying periods, ranging from a single trip (spot charter) to a long-term period which may be many years. Under a time charter, owners assume no risk for finding business and obtaining and paying for fuel or other expenses related to the voyage, such as port entry fees. In general, a long-term time charter assures the vessel owner of a consistent stream of revenue. Operating the vessel in the spot market affords the owner greater spot market opportunity, which may result in high rates when vessels are in high demand or low rates when vessel availability exceeds demand. Vessel charter rates are affected by world economics, international events, weather conditions, labor strikes, governmental policies, supply and demand, and many other factors that might be beyond the control of management.

Consistent with industry practice, Navios Holdings uses TCE rates, as a method of analyzing fluctuations between financial periods and as a method of equating revenue generated from a voyage charter to time charter revenue.

TCE rate also serves as an industry standard for measuring revenue and comparing results between geographical regions and among competitors.

The cost to maintain and operate a vessel increases with the age of the vessel. Older vessels are less fuel efficient, cost more to insure and require upgrades from time to time to comply with new regulations. The average age of Navios Holdings’ owned core fleet is 7.7 years, basis fully delivered fleet. However, as such fleet ages or if Navios Holdings expands its fleet by acquiring previously owned and older vessels, the cost per vessel would be expected to rise and, assuming all else, including rates, remains constant, vessel profitability would be expected to decrease.

Statement of Operations Breakdown by Segment

Navios Holdings reports financial information and evaluates its operations by charter revenues and not by vessel type, length of ship employment, customers or type of charter. Navios Holdings does not use discrete financial information to evaluate the operating results for each such type of charter. Although revenue can be identified for each type of charters, management does not identify expenses, profitability or other financial information on a charter-by-charter or type of charter basis. The reportable segments reflect the internal organization of the Company and are strategic businesses that offer different products and services. The Company currently has two reportable segments: the Dry bulk Vessel Operations and the Logistics Business. The Dry bulk Vessel Operations segment consists of the transportation and handling of bulk cargoes through the ownership, operation, and trading of vessels, freight, and FFAs. The Logistics Business segment consists of port terminal business, barge business and cabotage business in the Hidrovia region of South America. Navios Holdings measures segment performance based on net income attributable to Navios Holdings’ common stockholders.

For further segment information, please see Note 18 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

 

76


Table of Contents

Period over Period Comparisons

For the year ended December 31, 2017 compared to the year ended December 31, 2016

The following table presents consolidated revenue and expense information for each of the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. This information was derived from the audited consolidated revenue and expense accounts of Navios Holdings for each of the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016.

 

(In thousands of U.S. dollars)    Year Ended
December 31,
2017
     Year Ended
December 31,
2016
 

Revenue

   $ 463,049      $ 419,782  

Administrative fee revenue from affiliates

     23,667        21,799  

Time charter, voyage and logistics business expenses

     (213,929      (175,072

Direct vessel expenses

     (116,713      (127,396

General and administrative expenses incurred on behalf of affiliates

     (23,667      (21,799

General and administrative expenses

     (27,521      (25,295

Depreciation and amortization

     (104,112      (113,825

Provision for losses on accounts receivable

     (269      (1,304

Interest income

     6,831        4,947  

Interest expense and finance cost

     (121,611      (113,639

Impairment losses

     (50,565      —    

(Loss)/gain on bond and debt extinguishment

     (981      29,187  

Gain on sale of assets

     1,064        —    

Other income

     6,140        18,175  

Other expense

     (13,761      (11,665
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loss before equity in net earnings of affiliated companies

   $ (172,378    $ (96,105

Equity/(loss) in net earnings of affiliated companies

     4,399        (202,779
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loss before taxes

   $ (167,979    $ (298,884

Income tax benefit/(expense)

     3,192        (1,265
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss

   $ (164,787    $ (300,149

Less: Net income attributable to the noncontrolling interest

     (1,123      (3,674
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to Navios Holdings common stockholders

   $ (165,910    $ (303,823
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Set forth below are selected historical and statistical data for the dry bulk vessel operations segment for each of the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016 that the Company believes may be useful in better understanding the Company’s financial position and results of operations.

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
 
     2017     2016  

FLEET DATA

    

Available days

     23,433       21,908  

Operating days

     23,359       21,742  

Fleet utilization

     99.7     99.2

Equivalent vessels

     64       60  

AVERAGE DAILY RESULTS

    

TCE

   $ 9,705     $ 8,220  

During the year ended December 31, 2017, there were 1,525 more available days as compared to 2016, mainly due to an increase in long-term and short-term charter-in fleet available days by 2,003 days. This increase was partially mitigated by a decrease in available days for owned vessels by 478 days, mainly due to the sale of Navios Ionian and Navios Horizon. Navios Holdings can increase or decrease its fleet’s size by chartering-in vessels for long or short-term periods (less than one year).

The average TCE rate for the year ended December 31, 2017 was $9,705 per day, $1,485 per day higher than the rate achieved in 2016, mainly due to the improved freight market.

 

77


Table of Contents

Revenue: Revenue from dry bulk vessel operations for the year ended December 31, 2017 was $250.4 million as compared to $199.5 million for the same period during 2016. The increase in dry bulk revenue was mainly attributable to (i) the increase in TCE per day; and (ii) an increase in available days of our fleet.

Revenue from the logistics business was $212.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to $220.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. The decrease of $7.7 million was mainly attributable to (i) a $22.9 million decrease in the barge business, mainly due to the expiration of certain iron ore transportation contracts in the second half of 2016; and (ii) a $4.5 million decrease in the cabotage business mainly attributable to a decrease in the cabotage fleet’s operating days. The overall decrease was partially mitigated by (i) a $17.2 million increase in the port terminal business mainly attributable to the commencement of operations at the new iron ore terminal; and (ii) a $2.5 million increase in sales of products, mainly attributable to an increase in volume and price of the products sold at the Paraguayan liquid port terminal.

Administrative Fee Revenue from Affiliates: Administrative fee revenue from affiliates increased by $1.9 million, or 8.7%, to $23.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $21.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. See general and administrative expenses incurred on behalf of affiliates and general and administrative expenses discussion below.

Time Charter, Voyage and Logistics Business Expenses: Time charter, voyage and logistics business expenses increased by $38.8 million or 22.2% to $213.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $175.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2016.

Time charter and voyage expenses from dry bulk operations increased by $34.1 million, or 29.5%, to $149.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $115.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. This was primarily due to (i) an increase in charter-in expenses by $30.5 million, mainly due to an increase in charter-in available days in 2017, as compared to the same period in 2016; and (ii) an increase in port expenses by $4.1 million. The overall increase was partially mitigated by a decrease in other voyage expenses by $0.5 million.

Of the total expenses for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, $64.3 million and $59.6 million, respectively, related to Navios Logistics. The increase of $4.7 million in time charter, voyage and logistics business was mainly due to (i) a $3.2 million increase in cost of products sold mainly attributable to the increase in the volume and price of the products sold at the Paraguayan liquid port terminal; and (ii) a $2.1 million increase in the port terminal business mainly attributable to the commencement of operations in the second quarter of 2017 at the new iron ore terminal. The overall increase was partially mitigated by (i) a $0.4 million decrease in barge business mainly attributable to the reduced number of voyages; and (ii) a $0.2 million decrease in cabotage business mainly attributable to the decrease in the number of operating days of the fleet.

Direct Vessel Expenses: Direct vessel expenses decreased by $10.7 million, or 8.4%, to $116.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $127.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. Direct vessel expenses include crew costs, provisions, deck and engine stores, lubricating oils, insurance premiums and costs for maintenance and repairs.

Direct vessel expenses from dry bulk operations decreased by $5.2 million, or 10.1%, to $46.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $51.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. This decrease was mainly attributable to (i) a decrease in operating days of the owned vessels mainly due to the sale of the Navios Ionian and the Navios Horizon; (ii) a decrease in crew related costs; (iii) a decrease in insurance costs; and (iv) a decrease in spare expenses.

Of the total amounts of direct vessel expenses for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, $70.5 million and $76.0 million, respectively, related to the logistics business. The decrease of $5.5 million in direct vessel expenses was mainly due to (i) a $4.9 million decrease in barge business mainly attributable to decreased repairs and maintenance and crew costs; and (ii) a $1.6 million decrease in cabotage business mainly attributable to a decrease in the cabotage fleet’s operating days. The overall decrease was partially mitigated by a $1.0 million increase in amortization of deferred drydock and special survey costs of Navios Logistics’ fleet.

General and Administrative Expenses Incurred on Behalf of Affiliates: General and administrative expenses incurred on behalf of affiliates increased by $1.9 million, or 8.7%, to $23.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $21.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. See general and administrative expenses discussion below.

 

78


Table of Contents

General and Administrative Expenses: General and administrative expenses of Navios Holdings are composed of the following:

 

(in thousands of U.S. dollars)    Year Ended
December 31,
2017
     Year Ended
December 31,
2016
 

Administrative fee revenue from affiliates

   $ (23,667    $ (21,799

General and administrative expenses incurred on behalf of affiliates

     23,667        21,799  

General and administrative expenses

     27,521        25,295  
(in thousands of U.S. dollars)    Year Ended
December 31,
2017
     Year Ended
December 31,
2016
 

Dry bulk Vessel Operations

   $ 10,856      $ 11,001  

Logistics Business

     16,665        14,294  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

General and administrative expenses

   $ 27,521      $ 25,295  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The increase in general and administrative expenses by $2.2 million, or 8.7%, to $27.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $25.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, was mainly attributable to a $2.4 million increase in general and administrative expenses of logistics business, partially mitigated by a $0.2 million decrease in other administrative expenses.

Depreciation and Amortization: For the year ended December 31, 2017, depreciation and amortization decreased by $9.7 million to $104.1 million, as compared to $113.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2016.

Depreciation expenses related to dry bulk operations decreased by $0.8 million, or 1.1%, to $73.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $74.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. This decrease was primarily due to the sale of the Navios Ionian and the Navios Horizon. Amortization expenses related to dry bulk operations decreased by $9.2 million, or 72.2%, to $3.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $12.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. This decrease was mainly due to early redelivery of one vessel in the third quarter of 2016, resulting in the subsequent write-off of the related purchase option and the favorable lease balance.

Of the total amount of depreciation and amortization for the year ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, $26.9 million and $26.7 million, respectively, related to Navios Logistics. The increase in depreciation and amortization of the logistics business was mainly due to (i) a $1.7 million increase in the port terminal business mainly due to the commencement of operations at the new iron ore terminal; and (ii) a $0.2 million increase in the cabotage business. The overall increase was partially mitigated by $1.7 million decrease in the barge business mainly due to the accelerated depreciation of certain barges, recorded in 2016.

Provision for Losses on Accounts Receivable: For the year ended December 31, 2017, provision for losses on accounts receivable decreased by $1.0 million to $0.3 million, as compared to $1.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. The decrease was mainly attributable to (i) $0.7 million decrease in the provision for losses in the logistics business and (ii) $0.3 million recovery of bad debt provisions in the dry bulk vessel operations.

Interest Income: Interest income increased by $1.9 million to $6.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $4.9 million for the same period in 2016, mainly due to a $2.5 million increase in interest income of the dry bulk vessel operations, mainly due to higher interest income from loans provided to Navios Europe I and Navios Europe II and the amortization of the premium from the transfer of Navios Holdings’ participation in the Navios Revolving Loans I (as defined herein) to Navios Partners in March 2017. The overall increase was partially mitigated by a $0.6 million decrease in interest income of logistics business mainly due to lower income from short-term deposits.

Interest Expense and Finance Cost: Interest expense and finance cost for the year ended December 31, 2017 increased by $8.0 million, or 7.0%, to $121.6 million, as compared to $113.6 million in the same period of 2016. This increase was due to (i) a $3.9 million increase in interest expense and finance cost of the dry bulk vessel operations, mainly attributable to increase in interest expense and finance costs related to the Navios Acquisition Loan, and its full repayment in November 2017; and (ii) a $4.1 million increase in interest expense and finance cost of the logistics business mainly attributable to the increased amount of debt, and the reduced amount of capitalized interest, following the completion of the new iron ore terminal, during the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

79


Table of Contents

Impairment Losses: During the year ended December 31, 2017, the Company recognized (i) an impairment loss of $32.9 million for one of the Company’s vessels; (ii) an impairment loss of $9.1 million relating to the sale of Navios Ionian which was completed on June 16, 2017; (iii) an impairment loss of $5.1 million relating to the sale of Navios Horizon which was completed on July 2017; and (iv) an impairment loss of $3.4 million relating to a favorable lease term considered as impaired and written off.

Gain on Bond and Debt Extinguishment: During year ended December 31, 2017, the Company refinanced one of its secured credit facilities and a benefit to nominal value of $1.7 million was achieved. During November 2017, the Company refinanced its 2019 Notes resulting in a loss on bond extinguishment of $2.7 million.

Gain on Sale of Assets: Gain on sale of assets amounted to $1.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, mainly attributable to the sale of two self-propelled barges of the logistics business.

Other Income: Other income decreased by $12.1 million to $6.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $18.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. The decrease was due to a $14.2 million decrease in other income of dry bulk vessels operations and a $2.1 million increase in other income of the logistics business.

The decrease in other income of the dry bulk vessels operations is mainly due to the early redelivery of a vessel from its charterer in the first quarter of 2016 in exchange for $13.0 million in cash and settlement of outstanding claims payable to the charterer amounting to $1.9 million, partially mitigated by $0.7 million decrease in miscellaneous other income.

The increase in other income of the logistics business is mainly due to (i) a $1.1 million increase in other income of barge business mainly due to the income recorded from an arbitration award; and (ii) a $0.3 million increase in other income, partially mitigated by a $0.7 million decrease in taxes other than income taxes.

Other Expense: Other expense increased by $2.1 million to $13.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $11.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. This increase was due to a $1.2 million increase in other expense of the logistics business and a $0.9 million increase in other expense of dry bulk vessels operations.

The increase in other expense of dry bulk vessels operations is mainly due to a $2.1 million increase in losses from foreign exchange differences, partially mitigated by $1.2 million decrease in other miscellaneous expenses.

The increase in other expense of the logistics business is mainly due to an increase in loss from foreign exchange differences.

Equity/(loss) in Net Earnings of Affiliated Companies: Equity in net earnings of affiliated companies increased by $207.2 million to $4.4 million income for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $202.8 million loss for the same period in 2016. This increase was mainly due to (i) a $83.6 million OTTI loss relating to the investment in Navios Partners recognized in the fourth quarter of 2016; (ii) a $144.4 million OTTI loss relating to the investment in Navios Acquisition recognized in the fourth quarter of 2016; and (iii) a $20.9 million decrease in equity method income, partially mitigated by a $0.1 million increase in amortization of deferred gain from the vessels of Navios Partners (as more fully described below). The $20.9 million decrease in equity method income was mainly due to a $39.7 million decrease in equity method income from Navios Acquisition, partially mitigated by (i) a $18.5 million increase in equity method income from Navios Partners; (ii) a $0.2 million increase in equity method income from Navios Containers; (iii) a $0.2 million increase in equity method income from Acropolis; and (iv) a $0.1 million increase in equity method income from Navios Europe I and Navios Europe II.

The Company recognizes the gain from the sale of vessels to Navios Partners immediately in earnings only to the extent of the interest in Navios Partners owned by third parties and defers recognition of the gain to the extent of its own ownership interest in Navios Partners (see also “Item 7.B. Related Party Transactions”).

Income Tax Benefit/ (Expense): Income tax benefit increased by $4.5 million to a $3.2 million benefit for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to a $1.3 million loss for the year ended December 31, 2016. The change in income tax was mainly attributable to Navios Logistics due to (i) a $4.2 million increase in tax benefit in barge business mainly due to a reduction of deferred tax liability due to the decrease in future Argentinean income tax rates from 2018 onwards; and (ii) a $0.3 million decrease in income tax expense in cabotage business mainly due to lower pretax profit.

Net Income Attributable to the Noncontrolling Interest: Net income attributable to the noncontrolling interest decreased by $2.6 million to $1.1 million income for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $3.7 million for the same period in 2016. This decrease was mainly attributable to logistics business net income for the year ended December 31, 2017 compared to the same period in 2016.

 

80


Table of Contents

For the year ended December 31, 2016 compared to the year ended December 31, 2015

The following table presents consolidated revenue and expense information for each of the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively. This information was derived from the audited consolidated revenue and expense accounts of Navios Holdings for each of the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015.

 

(In thousands of U.S. dollars)    Year Ended
December 31,
2016
     Year Ended
December 31,
2015
 

Revenue

   $ 419,782      $ 480,820  

Administrative fee revenue from affiliates

     21,799        16,177  

Time charter, voyage and logistics business expenses

     (175,072      (247,882

Direct vessel expenses

     (127,396      (128,168

General and administrative expenses incurred on behalf of affiliates

     (21,799      (16,177

General and administrative expenses

     (25,295      (34,183

Depreciation and amortization

     (113,825      (120,310

Provision for losses on accounts receivable

     (1,304      (59

Interest income

     4,947        2,370  

Interest expense and finance cost

     (113,639      (113,151

Gain on bond and debt extinguishment

     29,187        —    

Other income

     18,175        4,840  

Other expense

     (11,665      (34,982
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loss before equity in net earnings of affiliated companies

   $ (96,105    $ (190,705

(Loss)/Equity in net earnings of affiliated companies

     (202,779      61,484  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loss before taxes

   $ (298,884    $ (129,221

Income tax (expense)/ benefit

     (1,265      3,154  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss

   $ (300,149    $ (126,067

Less: Net income attributable to the noncontrolling interest

     (3,674      (8,045
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to Navios Holdings common stockholders

   $ (303,823    $ (134,112
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Set forth below are selected historical and statistical data for the dry bulk vessel operations segment for each of the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015 that the Company believes may be useful in better understanding the Company’s financial position and results of operations.

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
 
     2016     2015  

FLEET DATA

    

Available days

     21,908       23,787  

Operating days

     21,742       23,453  

Fleet utilization

     99.2     98.6

Equivalent vessels

     60       65  

AVERAGE DAILY RESULTS

    

TCE

   $ 8,220     $ 7,846  

During the year ended December 31, 2016, there were 1,879 less available days as compared to 2015, due to a decrease in charter-in fleet available days by 2,895 days. This decrease was partially mitigated an increase in owned vessels available days by 1,016 days, mainly due to the delivery of Navios Sphera and Navios Mars in the first quarter of 2016. Navios Holdings can increase or decrease its fleet’s size by chartering-in vessels for long or short-term periods (less than one year).

The average TCE rate for the year ended December 31, 2016 was $8,220 per day, $374 per day higher than the rate achieved in 2015. This was due primarily to decreased voyage expenses in 2016 as compared to 2015, partially mitigated by the decline in the freight market during 2016 as compared to 2015.

 

81


Table of Contents

Revenue: Revenue from dry bulk vessel operations for the year ended December 31, 2016 was $199.5 million as compared to $229.8 million for the same period during 2015. The decrease in dry bulk revenue was mainly (i) a decrease in available days of our fleet by 1,879 days, mainly due to a decrease in short-term charter-in fleet available days; and (ii) the decrease in the freight market.

Revenue from the logistics business was $220.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to $251.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. The decrease of $30.7 million was mainly attributable to (i) a $10.7 million decrease in the cabotage business mainly attributable to a decrease in the available days of the cabotage fleet; (ii) a $9.2 million decrease in sales of products attributable to the decreased volume and sale price of the products sold at the Paraguayan liquid port terminal; (iii) a $6.1 million decrease in the port terminal business mainly attributable to a decrease in products transported at the dry port terminal; and (iv) a $4.7 million decrease in the barge business.

Administrative Fee Revenue From Affiliates: Administrative fee revenue from affiliates increased by $5.6 million, or 34.8%, to $21.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $16.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. See general and administrative expenses incurred on behalf of affiliates and general and administrative expenses discussion below.

Time Charter, Voyage and Logistics Business Expenses: Time charter, voyage and logistics business expenses decreased by $72.8 million or 29.4% to $175.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $247.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2015.

Time charter and voyage expenses from dry bulk operations decreased by $62.0 million, or 34.9%, to $115.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $177.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. This was primarily due to (i) the decrease in charter-in days (as discussed above); and (i) a decrease in voyage expenses mainly relating to fuel expenses.

Of the total expenses for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, $59.6 million and $70.4 million, respectively, related to Navios Logistics. The decrease of $10.8 million in time charter, voyage and logistics business was mainly due to (i) a $8.8 million decrease in the port terminal business mainly attributable to the decline in both the volume and the price of the products sold at the liquid port terminal in Paraguay; (ii) a $1.4 million decrease in the barge business mainly attributable to lower prices of fuel expense; and (iii) a $0.6 million decrease in the cabotage business mainly attributable to the decrease in the number of available days of Navios Logistics’ fleet.

Direct Vessel Expenses: Direct vessel expenses decreased by $0.8 million, or 0.6%, to $127.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $128.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. Direct vessel expenses include crew costs, provisions, deck and engine stores, lubricating oils, insurance premiums and costs for maintenance and repairs.

Direct vessel expenses from dry bulk operations increased by $5.3 million, or 11.4%, to $51.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $46.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. This increase was mainly attributable to (i) an increase in owned vessels available days due to the delivery of Navios Sphera and Navios Mars in the first quarter of 2016; (ii) an increase in crew expenses; (ii) an increase in spares expenses; and (iii) an increase in sundry general expenses.

Of the total amounts of direct vessel expenses for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, $76.0 million and $82.0 million, respectively, related to the Logistics Business. The decrease of $6.0 million in direct vessel expenses was mainly due to (i) a $8.2 million decrease in cabotage business mainly attributable to a decrease in the cabotage fleet’s available days and a decrease in crew costs; and (ii) a $0.4 million decrease in amortization of deferred drydock and special survey costs of the Navios Logistics’ fleet. This decrease was partially mitigated by a $2.6 million increase in direct vessel expenses of the barge business mainly attributable to increased repairs and maintenance and crew costs.

General and Administrative Expenses Incurred on Behalf of Affiliates: General and administrative expenses incurred on behalf of affiliates increased by $5.6 million, or 34.8%, to $21.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $16.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. See general and administrative expenses discussion below.

General and Administrative Expenses: General and administrative expenses of Navios Holdings are composed of the following:

 

(in thousands of U.S. dollars)    Year Ended
December 31,
2016
     Year Ended
December 31,
2015
 

Administrative fee revenue from affiliates

   $ (21,799    $ (16,177

General and administrative expenses incurred on behalf of affiliates

     21,799        16,177  

General and administrative expenses

     25,295        34,183  

 

82


Table of Contents
(in thousands of U.S. dollars)    Year Ended
December 31,
2016
     Year Ended
December 31,
2015
 

Dry bulk Vessel Operations

   $ 11,001      $ 20,175  

Logistics Business

     14,294        14,008  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

General and administrative expenses

   $ 25,295      $ 34,183  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The decrease in general and administrative expenses by $8.9 million, or 26.0%, to $25.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $34.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, was mainly attributable to (i) a $6.4 million decrease in payroll and other related costs; (ii) a $1.0 million decrease in professional, legal and audit fees; (iii) a $1.8 million decrease in other administrative expenses, including office expenses; partially mitigated by a $0.3 million increase attributable to the Logistics Business.

Depreciation and Amortization: For the year ended December 31, 2016, depreciation and amortization decreased by $6.5 million to $113.8 million, as compared to $120.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. The decrease was primarily due to the net effect of (i) the increase in depreciation and amortization of dry bulk vessels by $2.9 million, mainly due to the delivery of Navios Mars and Navios Sphera in January 2016; (ii) a decrease in the amortization of favorable and unfavorable lease balances by $8.1 million, mainly attributable to the re-delivery of two vessels to their headowners in the fourth quarter of 2015, the re-delivery to the headowners of one vessel in the third quarter of 2016 and the subsequent write-off of their purchase option, favorable and unfavorable lease balances; and (iii) a decrease in depreciation and amortization of the logistics business by $1.3 million.

Provision for Losses on Accounts Receivable: For the year ended December 31, 2016, provision for losses on accounts receivable increased by $1.2 million to $1.3 million, as compared to $0.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. The increase was mainly attributable to the logistics business.

Interest Income: Interest income increased by $2.5 million to $4.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $2.4 million for the same period in 2015, mainly due to (i) a $1.7 million increase of interest income from Navios Europe I and Navios Europe II; (ii) a $0.6 million increase of interest income from Navios Partners under the Navios Partners Credit Facility (as defined herein); and (ii) $0.2 million increase in interest income of the logistics business, mainly due to higher income from short-term deposits.

Interest Expense and Finance Cost: Interest expense and finance cost for the year ended December 31, 2016 increased by $0.4 million, or 0.4%, to $113.6 million, as compared to $113.2 million in the same period of 2015. This increase was due to (i) a $3.3 million increase in interest expense and finance cost of the dry bulk vessel operations, mainly attributable to the new loans concluded during 2016 and the decrease in the amount of interest capitalized following the delivery of Navios Mars and Navios Sphera, partially mitigated by a decrease in interest expense due to the repurchase of $58.9 million of the 2019 Notes; and (ii) a $2.9 million decrease in interest expense and finance cost of the logistics business.

Gain on bond and debt extinguishment: During the year ended December 31, 2016, the Company repurchased $58.9 million of the 2019 Notes for a cash consideration of $30.7 million resulting in a gain on bond extinguishment of $27.7 million, net of deferred fees written-off. During October 2016, the Company prepaid one of its secured credit facilities, which had an outstanding balance of $15.3 million, using $13.8 million in cash, thus achieving a $1.5 million benefit to nominal value.

Other Income: Other income increased by $13.4 million to $18.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $4.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. The increase was due to a $13.9 million increase in other income of dry bulk vessels operations and a $0.5 million decrease in other income of the logistics business.

The increase in other income of the dry bulk vessels operations is mainly due to (i) a $14.9 million increase in other income relating to the early redelivery of one vessel during the first quarter of 2016; and (ii) a $0.4 million increase in miscellaneous other income. This increase was partially offset by a $1.4 million decrease in gains from foreign exchange differences.

Other Expense: Other expense decreased by $23.3 million to $11.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $35.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. This decrease was due to a $19.2 million decrease in other expense of dry bulk vessels operations and a $4.1 million decrease in other expense of the logistics business.

 

83


Table of Contents

The decrease in other expense of dry bulk vessels operations is mainly due to (i) a $18.8 million expense relating to claims under the Navios Partners Guarantee (as defined below) initially recorded in 2015, (ii) a $0.1 million decrease in losses from foreign exchange differences; and (iii) a $1.7 million decrease in other miscellaneous expenses. This decrease was partially mitigated by a $1.4 million decrease in the reclassification to earnings of available-for-sale securities for an “other-than-temporary” impairment during 2016 compared to last year. The decrease in other expense of the logistics business was mainly due to a decrease in taxes other-than-income taxes.

Equity/(loss) in Net Earnings of Affiliated Companies: Equity in net earnings of affiliated companies decreased by $264.3 million to $202.8 million loss for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $61.5 million income for the same period in 2015. This decrease was mainly due to (i) a $83.6 million OTTI loss relating to its investment in Navios Partners recognized during the year ended December 31, 2016; (ii) a $144.4 million OTTI loss relating to its investment in Navios Acquisition recognized during the year ended December 31, 2016; (iii) a $35.5 million decrease in equity method income; and (iv) a $0.8 million decrease in amortization of deferred gain from the sale of vessels to Navios Partners (as more fully described below). The $35.5 million decrease in equity method income was mainly due to (i) a $20.7 million decrease in equity method income from Navios Partners; (ii) $13.5 million decrease in equity method income from Navios Acquisition; and (iii) a $1.3 million decrease in equity method income from Navios Europe I and Navios Europe II.

The Company recognizes the gain from the sale of vessels to Navios Partners immediately in earnings only to the extent of the interest in Navios Partners owned by third parties and defers recognition of the gain to the extent of its own ownership interest in Navios Partners (see also “Item 7.B. Related Party Transactions”).

Income Tax Benefit/ (Expense): Income tax benefit decreased by $4.5 million to $1.3 million expense for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to a $3.2 million benefit for the year ended December 31, 2015. The change in income tax was mainly attributable to Navios Logistics due to the effect of the pre-tax gains of certain subsidiaries of the barge business.

Net (Income)/ Loss Attributable to the Noncontrolling Interest: Net income attributable to the noncontrolling interest decreased by $4.3 million to $3.7 million income for the year ended December 31, 2016, as compared to $8.0 million for the same period in 2015. This decrease was mainly attributable to logistics business net income for the year ended December 31, 2016 compared to the same period in 2015.

Non-Guarantor Subsidiaries

Our non-guarantor subsidiaries accounted for $212.6 million, or 45.9%, of our revenue, $1.7 million net income of our total net loss, $61.1 million, or 88.8% of our Adjusted EBITDA, $952.6 million, or 36.2%, of our total assets and $588.5 million, or 29.2%, of our total liabilities, in each case, for the year ended and as of December 31, 2017. Our non-guarantor subsidiaries accounted for $220.3 million, or 52.5%, of our revenue, $5.4 million net income of our total net loss, $63.3 million of Adjusted EBITDA, $940.3 million, or 34.2%, of our total assets and $509.0 million, or 26.1%, of our total liabilities for the year ended December 31, 2016. Our non-guarantor subsidiaries accounted for $251.0 million, or 52.2%, of our revenue, $16.2 million, or 12.1%, of our total net loss and $74.4 million, or 66.0%, of Adjusted EBITDA, $871.8 million, or 29.5%, of our total assets and $449.6 million, or 24.3%, of our total liabilities, in each case, for the year ended December 31, 2015.

B. Liquidity and Capital Resources

Navios Holdings has historically financed its capital requirements with cash flows from operations, equity contributions from stockholders, issuance of debt and borrowings under bank credit facilities. Main uses of funds have been capital expenditures for the acquisition of new vessels, new construction and upgrades at the port terminals, expenditures incurred in connection with ensuring that the owned vessels comply with international and regulatory standards, repayments of debt and payments of dividends. Navios Holdings may from time to time, subject to restrictions under its debt and equity instruments, including limitations on dividends and repurchases under its preferred stock, depending upon market conditions and financing needs, use funds to refinance or repurchase its debt in privately negotiated or open transactions, by tender offer or otherwise, in compliance with applicable laws, rules and regulations, at prices and on terms Navios Holdings deems appropriate and subject to Navios Holdings cash requirements for other purposes, compliance with the covenants under Navios Holdings’ debt agreements, and other factors management deems relevant. Navios Holdings’ cash forecast indicates that it will generate sufficient cash for at least the next 12 months from April 13, 2018 to make the required principal and interest payments on its indebtedness, provide for the normal working capital requirements of the business and remain in a positive working capital position. Generally, our sources of funds may be from cash from operations, long-term borrowings and other debt or equity financings, proceeds from asset sales and proceeds from sale of our stake in our investments. We cannot assure you that we will be able to secure adequate financing or obtain additional funds on favorable terms, to meet our liquidity needs.

See “Item 4.B Business Overview — Exercise of Vessel Purchase Options”, “Working Capital Position” and “Long-Term Debt Obligations and Credit Arrangements” for further discussion of Navios Holdings’ working capital position.

 

84


Table of Contents

The following table presents cash flow information for each of the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015.

 

(in thousands of U.S. dollars)    Year Ended
December 31,
2017
     Year Ended
December 31,
2016
     Year Ended
December 31,
2015
 

Net cash provided by operating activities

   $ 50,784      $ 36,920      $ 43,478  

Net cash used in investing activities

     (42,365      (150,565      (36,499

Net cash (used in)/ provided by financing activities

     (16,779      86,225        (91,123
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Decrease in cash and cash equivalents

     (8,360      (27,420      (84,144

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year

     135,992        163,412        247,556  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

   $ 127,632      $ 135,992      $ 163,412  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Cash provided by operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016:

Net cash provided by operating activities increased by $13.9 million to $50.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $36.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2016. In determining net cash provided by operating activities, net loss is adjusted for the effects of certain non-cash items, which may be analyzed in detail as follows:

 

(in thousands of U.S. dollars)    Year Ended
December 31,
2017
     Year Ended
December 31,
2016
 

Net loss

   $ (164,787    $ (300,149

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by operating activities:

     

Depreciation and amortization

     104,112        113,825  

Amortization and write-off of deferred financing costs

     6,391        5,653  

Amortization of deferred drydock and special survey costs

     14,727        13,768  

Provision for losses on accounts receivable

     269        1,304